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Latest from Veronica Waters

    Dangerous drugs, and dozens of people accused of selling them, are now off the street.  Spalding County police are in the process of locking up 60+ offenders for selling and distributing methamphetamine and heroin across metro Atlanta, and out of Georgia into other states.  Investigators say they obtained more than 100 arrest warrants. About 10 of those arrested are affiliated with the Ghostface Gangsters, Sheriff Darrell Dix tells WSB Radio.  “The Ghostfaced are predominantly Caucasian,” Dix adds, and explains, “They have a lot of beliefs very similar to neo-Nazi, Aryan-type beliefs and they are extremely violent.”  Dix says that after three people died of suspected fentanyl-laced meth or heroin, they used wiretaps to track that drug network. “We started getting information about a local dealer here,” Dix explains, adding, “His name is Kevin Pitts.  “We initially went up on a wire on his phone, and then we found his source who was dealing in the metro area.”  A second wiretapping led deputies to their main target – Amanda Pugh.  Dix says that Pugh was the source of methamphetamine that came into Spalding County that police believe could be connected to multiple deaths.  Pugh's drug network had customers as far away as West Virginia, with some arrests also coming in Florida and South Carolina. As the investigation grew, Spalding County investigators found that some of the suspects were already on the radar of other agencies. Other information that was uncovered was turned over to the DEA.  The two-month long investigation was dubbed “Operation Say No More.” Dix tells WSB that was a catchphrase used repeatedly by one of the main suspects. “On the phone, when people were ordering drugs or wanting guns from him, he would just always end the conversation with, ‘Say no more,’” Dix says.  He adds that overall, this is a major blow to this trafficking network. “As I have said before, if you sell narcotics, or are a gang member, you are a criminal,” Dix affirms, saying, “You have three choices. You can stop, you can leave Spalding County, or you can begin counting down your days of freedom because we are coming for you.  “If you choose to be a criminal, thug, or gang member, you’ve made your choice, so get used to seeing us on a regular basis. We are not backing down and we will do everything we can to make our county safer.”
  • It's not all fun when the games get this big. As the Mega Millions and Powerball jackpots are now worth more than $2 billion combined, some convenience stores are seeing long lines of hopeful winners coming to buy lottery tickets. At QuikTrip, the frenzy means long hours for employees.  'What we've learned is when you get massive lines like this, our people get worn out,' QuikTrip spokesman Mike Thornbrugh tells WSB. 'You know, the monotony of just pushing a button over and over and over again. 'So we spend a lot of time trying to relieve people because believe it or not, it's hard on your back, and it's really hard on your index finger!'  Thornbrugh says for the most part, stores have only one lottery machine, so the lines for tickets are handled by only one worker at at a time. The stores have to increase the frequency of breaks, and also bring in extra staffers to help.  'It's just been constant, 24 hours a day selling these tickets,' he says.  Even though the crowds are large, it doesn't necessarily translate to big business for the stores, Thornbrugh reveals.  'The downside of it is when you get jackpots this high, the discretionary money that somebody would spend maybe on a hot dog, a sandwich, or a fountain drink, that money's really being used for the lottery ticket. So the other inside sales, they suffer a little bit on this,' he says.  Thornbrugh says while QuikTrip is happy to help, they can see their personnel getting tired.  'We want somebody to win,' he laughs.  He also says he just might buy a lottery ticket himself--provided the lines are not too long.
  • Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms pulled an expected vote on the Gulch deal from the agenda of a Wednesday special-called meeting of the City Council. Thursday, the council's president, Felicia Moore, called a special meeting for October 24th, which was to focus on water and sewer bonds. Moore also included the public financing package for the $5 billion Gulch development. The next day, Friday, Bottoms' Chief of Staff Marva Lewis wrote in a memo to Moore stating that the mayor’s office wanted the legislation removed from the agenda, saying the plan to include it was based on the understanding that outside counsel would have details of the new plan ready for review by October 17.
  • The city of Atlanta has settled with its ousted fire chief Kelvin Cochran, who was let go amid a hubbub over a book he wrote which compared homosexuality to bestiality. The city council Monday approved by an 11-3 vote paying $1.2 million to Cochran. Cochran's 2015 dismissal came after he wrote a book called 'Who Told You That You Were Naked?' in late 2013, giving it to some subordinates at work.
  • A now-fired Atlanta Police sergeant has been indicted on four charges stemming from the February 2017 shooting of a North Carolina tourist near the Georgia Dome.  A Fulton County grand jury handed up an indictment Wednesday against Mathieu Cadeau, 52, on counts of aggravated assault, reckless endangerment, and two counts of violation of his oath of office.   The man who was shot, Noel Hall, says he is happy to hear about the charges.  'I think it's a good start going forward, and it looks like things are moving in the right direction of what I feel needs to happen,' said Hall.
  • You have probably heard the “Objection! Hearsay!” line in your favorite legal drama.  A Cobb County judge must decide whether alleged hearsay can be used against an accused child molester.  The Georgia Supreme Court unanimously ruled that when the case against Antonio Almanza goes to trial, hearsay evidence identifying him as the alleged abuser is not categorically barred under Georgia’s new rules of evidence.  In May 2014, a Cobb County girl told her mother that a relative had molested her. The mother alerted authorities, who told her to take the child to the doctor for an examination.  At the hospital, the mom told an ER doctor that Almanza had touched and raped the girl. Almanza was indicted for aggravated child molestation, aggravated sexual battery, statutory rape, child molestation, and incest.  Since that outcry, the mom and the little girl have vanished, and prosecutors have not been able to find her. They believe the pair may have left the country. The Cobb County District Attorney sought to have the mother's statements at the hospital, and later to the girl's pediatrician, admitted as evidence.  Almanza's lawyers objected, saying that the testimony from doctors does not fall under the typical medical exceptions to the hearsay rule. Hearsay testimony is usually barred because defendants have the right to cross-examine witnesses, which they cannot do if the speaker is not in court. The trial judge, then the Court of Appeals, said that the testimony was inadmissible hearsay.  WSB legal analyst Phil Holloway says one exception to the hearsay rule is for medical diagnosis and treatment – and what is considered 'pertinent.'  'If a child or a parent goes to the doctor and says the child has been molested or abused, it's important for the doctor to know how the child was molested or abused so the child can be treated properly,' Holloway explains, adding, 'What's not so important to diagnosis or treatment is the alleged identity of the abuser.'  Prosecutors contended, however, that the statements should be allowed under newer federal evidence rules which pushed out Georgia's older ones.  Cobb County District Attorney Vic Reynolds says he is pleased with the justices' 'well thought-out' opinion.  'The mother of that victim had made statements to the treating physicians about what happened to her daughter. We believe that should have been admissible in a court of law based on the opinions that we've read throughout the United States,' Reynolds says.  He adds, 'We were convinced in the end that the Supreme Court would agree with us and rule in our favor, and thankfully, they did.'  Holloway says the justices essentially punted the case back to the trial judge to decide, using the newer federal rules of evidence, whether the mother's statements can be heard by a jury.  'It's like a math teacher telling you got the problem wrong because you worked the equation wrong, even if you may have stumbled onto the correct final answer,' he says. 'The Cobb judge may well reach the same conclusion because under federal precedent, the state has a tough hill to climb.'  Reynolds is confident the statements pass the test, noting that the justices said both the trial court and the Appeals Court were wrong to use Georgia's outdated evidence rules in excluding the mom's statements. He calls the state Supreme Court's ruling a 'strong opinion in favor of all victims of crime.”
  • Dockless scooters dot sidewalks across Atlanta, but that is not always a guarantee that you can find one in a hurry.  Now, Bird is getting ready to launch Bird Delivery, which will drop off a scooter at your personal nest -- home or office -- and reserve it for you to ride all day.  Currently, scooter renters have to do a sort of seek-and-retrieve to hop on one of the rides, using a map on an app to find where the Birds are nested, as they can be ditched wherever a rider wants.  Some riders in midtown Atlanta seem intrigued by the idea, even as Bird has yet to release pricing information for the upcoming service, or a roll-out date.  Matthew Quinn began riding the electric scooters in recent months, and says the time of day affects how difficult they are to locate. He often needs one in the evening hours, when he says Birds seem to be more scarce, but Limes are not. The idea of scheduling a delivery could be worth exploring, he speculates.  'The pros would be getting it; the cons would be we'd probably still have to wait for it,' says Quinn. 'Like, they're driving around Atlanta in a truck?'  Bird charges $1.00 to unlock the scooter, and 15 cents per minute after that. Krysta Silva, a university student, says she's curious to know what the upcharge would be for a reserved rental. She says it could be worth the time saved.  'Where my apartment complex is, there's usually not that many,” says Silva, adding, “Every now and again there will be one, but it's like, 'Oh, I want to go to class [and] get there in five minutes,' and there's not one there. So it would be convenient.” Bird says the vehicle would be dropped off at your doorstep by 8:00 A.M.  The all-day reservation could be a move to give rideshare car services like Lyft or Uber a run for their money.  Dylan Atanasov frequents midtown and Buckhead for work and socializing, and rides the scooters daily.  'I don't drive in midtown, and I take MARTA to work every day, so this is just really convenient when I'm going somewhere besides home,' he says.  He expects that he will be a customer who has a Bird delivered to him, since he's had times when he walked out of his home and spent 20 minutes looking for a scooter. The pricing, he said, is not likely to deter him.  'It's probably still going to be better than an Uber most of the time,' says Atansov. 'This right now, I'm going to a friend's house that's like three miles away, and it's going to cost me about three dollars, or four.  'And I don't have to sit in traffic.'  Andy Watson is a scooter commuter who rides every day, but who would not have much use to schedule a delivery, he says. As he got ready to unlock a Bird off Peachtree Street, he says he usually finds scooters in the same spot daily as he heads back to his car in a parking lot.  'They're always right here, so it's not really a big issue. There's been a few days where there hasn't been one out in front of the building, but it's like 200 yards to walk, so it's not that bad,' he laughs.  As Watson opened his Bird app, there was the invitation to schedule a delivery. He entered his ZIP code and the app promised to let him know when the service was available.
  • Time, pain, and compensation. Those were the themes of attorney Neal Pope's closing arguments at the trial over a botched circumcision in Clayton County.  His first 18 days of life, said Pope, were Baby D.'s only normal ones of his life. 
  • The defense has rested in the Clayton County trial of a lawsuit over a botched circumcision, disputing the idea that the child will face years of mental anguish.The suit seeks damages for the child’s medical bills, as well as for physical and mental pain and suffering, disability, and disfigurement. Much of the defense's case was spent trying to prove to the jury that some of the defendants--the clinic owner, Anne Sigouin, and the boy's pediatrician--should not be held liable for things that happened at Life Cycle clinic in Riverdale.
  • The mother of a boy who suffered a botched circumcision at a Riverdale clinic tells a Clayton County jury about the anguishing aftermath. Stacie Willis contends she was never told a vital piece of information after the bloody procedure--that part of her 18-day-old baby boy's privates had been cut off. At times during the trial she has cried listening to the testimony; the day the nurse midwife who performed the procedure talked about how the sliced-off tissue was kept in a refrigerator and then thrown away, she got up and walked out of the courtroom in tears.
  • Veronica  Waters

    Reporter

    Veronica Waters is an anchor and reporter for News/Talk WSB. She is also the staff expert on legal affairs and the courts. In 2007, the Radio-Television News Directors Association named Waters' series on "Snaring Internet Predators" best in the region with an Edward R. Murrow award for Investigative Reporting.She has been honored by several professional organizations for news and sports feature reporting, and was named in 2003 as the Atlanta Press Club's Radio Journalist of the Year. Waters has covered an assortment of high-profile cases from Mayor Bill Campbell's corruption trial to the murder trials of activist-turned imam Jamil Al-Amin and of former DeKalb County, GA Sheriff Sidney Dorsey.She served as the station's correspondent for the murder trial of accused "Black Widow" Lynn Turner, and the death penalty case of double murderer Stacey Humphreys. One of the biggest legal cases in Atlanta history involved the notorious Gold Club racketeering trial. Waters covered this unfolding drama not only for WSB Radio and radio stations throughout America, but also for a worldwide audience on BBC Radio. Waters joined WSB in 1997 as an anchor and reporter. She began her journalism career at the Southern Urban Network and Mississippi Network in Jackson, MS. Waters attended Alcorn State University and Mississippi State University, and enjoys cheering for the NFL's Tennessee Titans.

    Latest from Veronica Waters » 

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  • A German shepherd snarled traffic as it loped on and off two Phoenix freeways during Tuesday morning's commute before it was captured by a state trooper who was bit on the hand while grabbing its collar. The trooper is going to be fine, and the wayward dog was being evaluated at an animal shelter after suffering paw injuries 'from running so much,' authorities said. Troopers used a stun gun and a pole-mounted snare to capture the animal after it rambled in and out of traffic and through local neighborhoods, said Trooper Kameron Lee, a Highway Patrol spokesman. Lee said dispatchers got calls overnight about the dog being on at least one freeway and that efforts to remove it intensified for more than an hour when it began tying up morning traffic on busy State Routes 51 and 202. 'Our troopers tried everything they could. We did finally get the dog out and he's going to be all right,' Lee added. 'He's just exhausted.' The dog at one point ran in and out of the carpool lane of State Route 51 before escaping into an adjacent neighborhood. It then turned up on nearby State Route 202, where traffic stopped as it evaded troopers and drivers, going under a truck at one point and evading a snare wielded by a trooper, Lee said. 'The dog just continued to not be cooperative,' he said. It then left that freeway and troopers found it on a nearby street where the final encounter occurred. Jose Miguel Santiago, spokesman for Maricopa County Animal Care and Control, said the 1-year-old dog was placed in quarantine to determine its demeanor and whether it has any health problems. It will then be evaluated to see whether it should be put up for adoption or go to a rescue organization, Santiago said.
  • Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says the U.S. has 'made clear' to South Korea that progress on disarming North Korea should not lag behind the expansion of relations between the two Koreas. Pompeo says there's 'complete agreement' between Washington and Seoul on this, but his comments to reporters underscore U.S. anxiety over a potential disconnect with its close ally. Pompeo says the U.S. and South Korea set up a working group, which is meeting in Washington on Tuesday, to ensure they don't 'talk past each other' on their dealings with North Korea. Negotiations between the U.S. and North Korea on ending its nuclear program have appeared to stall in the months since President Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un held a historic summit in Singapore.
  • An actress who says she had a relationship with Michael Avenatti alleges he dragged her by the arm across the floor of his Los Angeles apartment after an argument. Court papers obtained Tuesday by The Associated Press detail Mareli Miniutti's account. A Los Angeles judge granted Miniutti a restraining order against Avenatti on Monday. She wrote in a sworn statement that before grabbing her, Avenatti shouted expletives and told her she was 'ungrateful.' Avenatti is best known as the attorney for porn actress Stormy Daniels, who alleges she was paid to keep quiet about an affair with Donald Trump. Avenatti was arrested on a felony domestic violence charge last week. Avenatti says the allegations are 'completely false' and 'fabricated.' He says he'll be fully vindicated after a thorough investigation.
  • One of the nation's largest student loan servicing companies may have driven tens of thousands of borrowers struggling with their debts into higher-cost repayment plans. That's the finding of a Department of Education audit of practices at Navient Corp., the nation's third-largest student loan servicing company. The conclusions of the 2017 audit, which until now have been kept from the public and were obtained by The Associated Press, appear to support federal and state lawsuits that accuse Navient of boosting its profits by steering some borrowers into the high-cost plans without discussing options that would have been less costly in the long run. The education department has not shared the audit's findings with the plaintiffs in the lawsuits. In fact, even while knowing of its conclusions, the department repeatedly argued that state and other federal authorities do not have jurisdiction over Navient's business practices. 'The existence of this audit makes the Department of Education's position all the more disturbing,' said Aaron Ament, president of the National Student Legal Defense Network, who worked for the Department of Education under President Barack Obama. The AP received a copy of the audit and other documents from the office of Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Massachusetts, who has been a vocal critic of Navient and has publicly supported the lawsuits against the company as well as questioning the policies of the Department of Education, currently run by President Trump's Secretary of Education, Betsy DeVos. Warren is considered a potential presidential candidate in 2020. Navient disputed the audit's conclusions in its response to the Department of Education and has denied the allegations in the lawsuits. One point the company makes in its defense is that its contract with the education department doesn't require its customer service representatives to mention all options available to the borrower. However, the five states suing Navient — Illinois, Pennsylvania, Washington, California and Mississippi — say the behavior breaks their laws regarding consumer protection. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau says in its own lawsuit the practices are unfair, deceptive and abusive and break federal consumer protection laws. Of the five states that filed lawsuits against Navient, only Illinois and Pennsylvania were even aware of the audit, and they said they did not receive their copies from the Department of Education. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau declined to comment on whether it had a copy of the report. The Department of Education said withholding the report was intentional, repeating the argument it has made in court and in public that only it has jurisdiction over student loan servicing issues, through its Federal Student Aid division, or FSA, which oversees student loans. 'FSA performed the review as part of its own contract oversight, not for the benefit of other agencies,' said Liz Hill, a Department of Education spokeswoman. When student borrowers run into difficulties making payments, they can be offered forbearance, which allows them to delay payments for a set period of time. But under a forbearance plan, in most instances, the loan continues to accumulate interest and becomes a more expensive option in the long run. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau alleges in its lawsuit against Navient that between 2010 and 2015 Navient's behavior added nearly $4 billion in interest to student borrowers' loans through the overuse of forbearance. It is a figure that Navient disputes. A 2017 study by the Government Accountability Office estimates that a typical borrower of a $30,000 student loan who places their loan into forbearance for three years — the maximum allowed for economic-hardship forbearance — would pay an additional $6,742 in interest on that loan. 'This finding is both tragic and infuriating, and the findings appear to validate the allegations that Navient boosted its profits by unfairly steering student borrowers into forbearance when that was often the worst financial option for them,' Warren said in a letter to Navient last week. As part of their inquiry, DoE auditors listened in on about 2,400 randomly selected calls to borrowers from 2014 to 2017 out of a batch of 219,000. On nearly one out of 10 of the calls examined, the Navient representative did not mention other options, including one type of plan that estimates the size of a monthly payment the borrower can afford based on their income. Auditors wrote that many customer service representatives failed to ask questions to determine if such a plan, known as an income-driven repayment plan, might be more beneficial to the borrower. There is no public record of how many struggling borrowers serviced by Navient may have been impacted by these practices. In its most recent annual report, Navient says it services 6 million student loan borrowers, of which 12.7 percent are more than 30 days past due. That would be roughly 762,000 customers who are struggling in some fashion to pay their student loans. If one out of every 10 of those customers were pushed into forbearance instead of an income-driven repayment plan, as the department's audit found, that would be 76,200 of Navient's borrowers. The DoE report contains recommendations for how Navient could fix its practices but makes no mention of firm requirements or sanctions. The education department's Federal Student Aid division decided to do a review of Navient's forbearance practices after the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau filed its lawsuit against the company in January 2017, department spokeswoman Hill said, to see if there were any compliance issues. She said DoE officials came to the conclusion that Navient was not improperly steering borrowers. 'Nothing in the report indicates forbearances were applied inappropriately — the observations noted focused on suggested improvements regarding how to best counsel' a small minority of borrowers, she said. In response to questions over the 2017 audit, Navient pointed to the fact that nine out of every 10 borrowers on the calls were offered all their options and that this audit is just one piece of a broader story. 'This (audit), when viewed as a whole, as well as dozens of other audits and reviews, show that Navient overwhelmingly performs in accordance with program rules while consistently helping borrowers choose the right options for their circumstances,' said Paul Hartwick, a company spokesman. Navient, which split off from Sallie Mae, is a publicly traded company. In calls and presentations with investors, Navient has said a company priority is to lower its operational costs. As a student loan servicing company, Navient has one primary operating cost: its employees, including the hundreds of customer-service agents who man Navient's telephones every day. The fewer customer-service agents Navient employs, the more money Navient puts in its pocket. Doing calls to determine whether a borrower should be in an income-driven repayment plan takes longer, student loan industry experts say. In fact, that is exactly what Navient said in its response to the Department of Education's audit. 'We (are not) aware of any requirement that borrowers receive all of their repayment options ... on each and every call,' the company said, adding that if the Department of Education chose to require all servicers to discuss income-driven repayment plans with all borrowers, the Department of Education needs to redo its contract with Navient. Seth Frotman, who was the highest-ranking government official in charge of student loans until he quit in August in protest over how the Trump-controlled Department of Education and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau were handling the issue of student loans, said Navient's response was outrageous. 'In short, Navient, when confronted with evidence of its bad practices, is telling the government, 'Pay us more money or take a hike.' And It looks like the Department of Education took a hike,' Frotman said. ___ Ken Sweet covers banks and consumer financial issues for The Associated Press. Follow him on Twitter at @kensweet.
  • If you're planning on purchasing gift cards this holiday season, then there are some important policy changes that you'll need to know about.  Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro announced nationwide gift card policy changes at a news conference Tuesday.  Three major retailers Walmart, Target and Best Buy have all agreed to new restrictions. There will be reductions in gift card limits, as well as restrictions on using gift cards to buy other gift cards. There also will be more employee training for people who work in the stores to help recognize scams when they are happening. >> Read more trending news  Shapiro said gift card scams have quadrupled in recent years.  Check back for more on this developing story, or click here.
  • With Black Friday just hours away, here is a look at some of the best deals of the 2018 holiday shopping season. Computers Apple iPad 2018 with 32GB for $249 – Jet  Apple iPad 2018, 128GB: $329 – Best Buy Apple MacBook Pro 13-inch 2018 for $1,150 – Best Buy Acer Aspire with the latest Core i5-8400 processor for $399.99 – BJ’s Acer 24-inch FHD FreeSync gaming monitor for $100 – Newegg  Dell Inspiron Chromebook 11 for $199.99 - Dell Dell G3 15.6-inch gaming laptop for $899 - Office Depot  Dell Inspiron 15.6-inch laptop for $319 – Dell  Dell Inspiron Small Desktop for $249.99 – Dell Dell Inspiron tower with Core i5 for $399.99 – Dell Dell XPS 13 for $1,500 – Costco Google Pixelbook laptop for $699 – Google Store HP 15.6-inch laptop for $349 – Office Depot  HP 1.6-inch Chromebook for $119.99  - Target HP Pavilion x360 14-inch with Intel Core i5 for $549 – Best Buy HP Pavilion 15 for $499 - Staples Lenovo Ideapad 330 Core i5 1TB HDD for $450 – Costco Samsung Galaxy Tab A 8-inch model for $129.99 – BJ’s Samsung Chromebook 3 for $99 – Walmart Surface Go base model for $399 – Microsoft Store Home technology Amazon Echo for $69 - Kohl’s Beats Powerbeats3 Wireless Earphones for $90 - Target Bose SoundSport wireless headphones for $99 - Walmart Canon imageClass MF244DW laser printer for $99 – Staples Fire HD 10 for $99.99 - Amazon Fire TV Cube 4K for $59.99 - Amazon Google Home Hub for $99 – Jet  Nest Hello Smart Doorbell for $129 – Google Store Ring Doorbell 2 +amazon Echo Dot 3rd gen for $140 – Best Buy Home goods 60 percent off select office chairs – Office Depot Keurig K-Mini single-serve coffee maker for $49.99 - Target KitchenAid Artisan 5-quart stand mixer for $279.99 - J.C. Penney Twin sheet sets for $5.99 - Macy’s Bath towels for $2.99 each - J.C. Penney Kenmore French door 26.1 cubic foot refrigerator for $889.99 – Sears  Nest Learning Thermostat 3rd Gen (matching Target) for $119 (was $199) iRobot Roomba 670 robot vacuum for $194.99 – Jet Televisions Element 55-inch smart UHD TV for $199.99 - Target 65-inch TCL 65S4 4K Roku TV for $398 - Walmart Samsung 32-inch Smart LED HD TV for $175 – eBay Samsung 75-inch 4K UHD TV and Xbox One S for $1,279 – Sam’s Club LG 70-inch 4K UHD Smart TV for $869 plus a $100 gift card – Sam’s Club LG 65-inch 4K UHD Smart TV for $599  - Sam’s Club Watches Apple Watch Series 3 (32mm) for $229 – Best Buy Fitbit Versa smartwatch for $149 - Target Samsung Galaxy Watch for $254.99 – eBay Miscellaneous Canon T6 DSLR Camera Bundle for $399 – Sam’s Club Potensic GPS FPV RC Drone, D80 with 1080P Camera Live Video and GPS Return Home for $199.99 – Amazon  Get select doorbusters free after mail-in rebate - Macy’s Want to check out the Black Friday ads? Here are some links: Amazon Bass Pro Shop Best Buy Belk BJ's Wholesale Costco Dell Dick’s Sporting Goods eBay GameStop Google Store Groupon JCPenney’s Jet Kmart Kohl’s Lenovo Macy’s Microsoft Store Meijer’s Nintendo Newegg Office Depot/OfficeMax Overstock Sam’s Club Samsung Sears Sony Staples Target T-Mobile Verizon Walmart Also see: >> Which restaurants are open on Thanksgiving? Here’s a list >> Which grocery stores are open on Thanksgiving Day 2018? >> Black Friday 2018: Walmart ad features deals on iPhones, TVs, laptops and more >> Oprah announces her 2018 favorite things; here’s what made the cut, where to buy  >> Black Friday 2018: Target, Kohl’s, Costco leak ads promising deals for the day after Thanksgiving