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Latest from Jamie Dupree

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday agreed to allow an unknown foreign company – owned by an unknown foreign government – to ask the justices to hear a legal challenge to a still-secret federal grand jury subpoena, which could be related to the Special Counsel probe into Russian interference in the 2016 elections. In two simple orders issued by the Justices this morning, the Supreme Court allowed the mystery foreign company to submit documents which would not be made public, but also required “redacted copies for the public record,” as the company challenges a request for information as part of an unknown federal investigation. At this point, the Supreme Court has not accepted the case for argument, but is allowing the unknown company to request a hearing before the Supreme Court – what is known as a writ of certiorari – as the foreign corporation is challenging lower court rulings which forced the company to turn over documents related to a federal grand jury investigation. NEW: Supreme Court granted mystery company's motion to file its appeal under seal in grand jury maybe-Mueller case. A redacted version of the petition will be made public soon — Lawrence Hurley (@lawrencehurley) January 22, 2019 The case has attracted widespread attention in recent months, as it quickly weaved its way through the federal courts in Washington, D.C. – in almost complete secrecy. At one point in December, an entire floor of a federal courthouse in Washington was sealed off to allow for arguments before a three-judge appeals panel. So far, the company – owned by a foreign government – has lost at every level, and has been ordered to pay financial penalties for every day that it does not comply with the grand jury request for information.
  • Two days after President Donald Trump unveiled his compromise plans to provide funding for his border wall in exchange for halting deportations for about 1 million people in the U.S. illegally under a pair of immigration programs, Senate Republicans on Monday night fleshed out the details as they released a 1,301 page bill which would also fully fund the government and end a partial government shutdown which has stretched for a month. “For the good of the country, I encourage my Democratic colleagues to either join us in passing this legislation or come to the negotiating table with constructive solutions of their own,” said Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL), the chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee. “Saying no to everything will not move our country forward,” Shelby added in a late night statement on Monday night. The plan not only includes the legislative text of the President’s immigration proposals, but also the language of seven different spending bills, which would fund all agencies of the federal government and end the shutdown that began back on December 22. New: Senate Republicans release 1,301-page bill to reopen the government and fund the wall, modeled on Trump’s proposal. TEXT: https://t.co/SMMukFI9az SUMMARY, via Approps GOP: https://t.co/eMeu364qJP — Sahil Kapur (@sahilkapur) January 22, 2019 As with previous legislation from Republicans about border security, the phrase “border wall” is not to be found at any point in either the legislative text, or the report language about the bill. Instead, the GOP plan would approve $5.7 billion for a ‘physical barrier system,’ intended to complete work on the ten highest priority border projects as determined by the Department of Homeland Security. Also included are the items spelled out by the President in his speech to the nation on Saturday: + The “BRIDGE” Act – legislation which would provide about 700,000 DACA recipients with a three year legal status in the United States, but no pathway to citizenship. + Also getting temporary legal status would be 300,000 who were once protected by the TPS program, allowing them to avoid deportation for three years. + The bill also would create a new plan which allows people to apply from asylum from their home country, rather than try to make the arduous trip from Central America, through Mexico, and into the United States. The plan also includes $12.7 billion in disaster relief aid for a variety of agricultural problems, including money to cover “cover blueberry and peach crop losses resulting from freezes and producers impacted by Tropical Storm Cindy,” $600 million to help the Marine Corps repair damage to installations in North Carolina, and for the Air Force to fix Tyndall Air Fore Base, in Florida, damaged by Hurricane Michael. The disaster aid section includes the following spending: + $480 million in Emergency Forest Restoration + $125 million in Emergency Watershed Protection + $150 million in Rural Community Facilities grants + $600 million in Economic Development assistance programs + $50 million to improve hurricane, flooding, and wildfire forecasts + $150 million for fishery disasters harming coastal communities + $28 million to replace damaged federal prison facilities. + $15 million for Legal Services Corporation to prove storm-related legal help. + $740 million in new Army Corps of Engineers flood and storm damage reduction projects. + $225 million for water projects on the Mississippi River and its tributaries + $350,000 for the Central Utah Project for wildfire remediation + $526 million for Coast Guard repairs + $312 million to repair damaged infrastructure in national parks and wildlife refuges. + $414 million in wastewater and drinking water projects as a result of 2018 hurricanes and wildfires. + $720 million to repay borrowed funds for FY 2018 wildfire work + $49.5 million in economic recovery from the Dislocated Worker National Reserve program + $246 million for the Department of Health and Human Services + $165 million for the Department of Education to help students affected by natural disasters + Over $850 million for military construction projects to replace items damaged by Hurricanes Florence and Michael + $10.5 million for Federal Transit Administration emergency relief House Democrats this week will also be pushing ahead with legislation to fund the government; the House last week approved $12.7 billion in disaster aid, though most Republicans opposed the plan, because the underlying bill did nothing about the border security issue. So far, no Democrats have endorsed the new effort from Republicans in the Senate.
  • With no evidence that a quick resolution is in sight for a partial government shutdown spurred by a dispute over funding for President Donald Trump’s border wall, federal agencies have started helping their workers apply for unemployment benefits in a bid to ease the financial pain of the shutdown, as more than 800,000 federal workers face the prospect of missing a second paycheck at the end of this week, with little evidence that Congress will forge a bipartisan solution to end this increasingly bitter political brawl. “Take this form with you if you go to file a claim,” states a document given to workers at the Commerce Department in recent days, advising them of how to file for unemployment benefits during the shutdown. “DO NOT DELAY filing a UI claim,” the document tells employees, “if you wait, your unemployment benefits may be reduced or you may not qualify for any benefits.” The financial pinch of the shutdown was taking a public toll on airport security screeners, as the Transportation Security Administration reported that 10 percent of its workforce took an sick day on Sunday,” as ‘unscheduled absences’ jumped over the long federal holiday weekend. Just spoke with an air traffic controller who is working without pay and driving for Uber on the side to make ends meet. This is insane. — Rep. Mike Levin (@RepMikeLevin) January 21, 2019 On Capitol Hill, there was no sense that President Trump’s Saturday speech – in which he offered an immigration deal to Democrats – had changed the dynamic of the shutdown politics at all. Senate Republicans were still planning to vote by Thursday on the President’s plan – as Republicans on Monday released a 1,301 page bill which covers the President’s immigration plans, as well as the seven major government funding bills which have not yet been approved by the Congress. Republicans would need all 53 GOP Senators to stick together – and then get the votes of seven Democrats. That seemed unlikely as lawmakers headed back to Washington, D.C. “This coming Friday is going to be the second paycheck missed for hundreds of thousands of public servants,” said Sen. Brian Schatz (D-HI). “There are multiple bills that could pass the House and Senate with a massive majority.” One GOP lawmaker suggested that both Democrats in the House and Republicans in the Senate allow a fully open debate in both chambers – after voting to re-open the government. Ways to break shutdown stalemate: 1. @SpeakerPelosi and @senatemajldr open up process, allow amendment votes, and send compromise to president to sign or veto, or 2. @POTUS agrees to sign one-week CR every week while parties negotiate. First is best but unlikely. Second is easy. — Justin Amash (@justinamash) January 21, 2019 House Democrats were planning two different votes this week – one on a package of bills to fund the government, and the second on a separate measure to fund the Department of Homeland Security. But those plans from Democrats did not include one thing that the President wants more than anything else – billions of dollars to fund the construction of a wall along the Mexican border. “Democrats are kidding themselves (they don’t really believe it!) if they say you can stop Crime, Drugs, Human Trafficking and Caravans without a Wall or Steel Barrier,” the President tweeted on Monday. The President’s plan includes $5.7 billion for border security – with some of that going to a wall; it would also shield around 700,000 DACA recipients, and another 300,000 people who had overstayed their temporary permission to be in the U.S., giving them a three-year legal status, allowing them to avoid being deported. Democrats have grumbled about the President’s offer to shield 1 million people from deportation, arguing that Mr. Trump was the one who tried to take away their immigration protections in the first place.
  • With no end in sight to the partial government shutdown, and the possibility that 800,000 federal workers will miss another paycheck at the end of this week, the Trump Administration reported Monday that ‘unscheduled absences’ by TSA airport screeners hit 10 percent on Sunday, with that number jumping over the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday weekend, as security screeners continue to work without pay because of a battle between the President and Democrats in Congress over funding for a border wall. “TSA experienced a national rate of 10 percent of unscheduled absences compared to a 3.1 percent rate one year ago on the same weekday,” the Transportation Security Administration reported, again using the same language in a daily news release that “many employees are reporting that they are not able to report to work due to financial limitations.” The number of absent screeners had held around 6 percent much of last week, but the TSA reported the number of screeners not showing up for work as planned hit 7 percent on Friday, 8 percent on Saturday, and then 10 percent on Sunday. . @TSA says that 10 percent of its workforce had an 'unscheduled absence' Sunday, compared to just 3.1 percent on the same day last year; that means more than 3,000 TSA agents called off #GovernmentShutdown — Gabe Gutierrez (@gabegutierrez) January 21, 2019 The TSA said in a news release that ‘99.9 percent of passengers waited less than 30 minutes’ to go through airport screening on Sunday. But on Saturday, excessive sick calls by TSA airport screeners forced officials at Baltimore-Washington International Airport to use emergency plans to deal with the lack of airport screeners, closing a major security checkpoint early at the airport. That major checkpoint for Southwest Airlines flights wasn’t closed for just a few hours – but remained shut down on Sunday and Monday as well, because of a lack of security screeners. “It is important to clarify that it is not unusual for TSA and BWI Marshall to open or close one of our security checkpoints,” the airport said in a written statement. “This will have minimal, if any, impact on passengers and no impact on airport operations,” the BWI statement read. . @TSA in collaboration with airport authorities & servicing airlines will be exercising a contingency plan at @BWI_Airport due to excessive callouts. Checkpoint A will be closing at 5:35pm. Passengers should arrive early for evening flights. Contact airport & airlines for updates — TSA (@TSA) January 19, 2019 Earlier this month, press reports of airport screeners calling in sick because of the government shutdown – and the lack of pay for screeners – was denounced as ‘fake news’ by a top Department of Homeland Security spokesman, as well as the White House. Like other federal workers, TSA screeners have been coming to work since the partial government shutdown started on December 22; they were paid as scheduled on December 29, but missed a check on January 11, and a second check may not be paid on January 25.
  • A day after offering Democrats a compromise designed to break an almost month-long impasse over border security funding, which has idled hundreds of thousands of federal government workers as a result of a partial government shutdown, President Donald Trump on Sunday denied that his plans amounted to ‘amnesty’ for illegal immigrants, as he pressed Democrats to accept the deal. “Amnesty is not a part of my offer,” the President wrote in one of a series of Sunday posts on Twitter about his Saturday afternoon speech, which basically offered temporary protection from deportation for about 1 million illegal immigrants, in exchange for $5.7 billion in funding for a border wall. Mr. Trump also sought to put pressure on Democrats – especially House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, as the White House touted the support of Republicans in the Senate, who will try to advance the border plan later this week. “Nancy Pelosi and some of the Democrats turned down my offer yesterday before I even got up to speak,” the President said. No, Amnesty is not a part of my offer. It is a 3 year extension of DACA. Amnesty will be used only on a much bigger deal, whether on immigration or something else. Likewise there will be no big push to remove the 11,000,000 plus people who are here illegally-but be careful Nancy! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 20, 2019 There were some conservative voices who gave the President’s plan a thumbs-down, not pleased with the move to shield around 700,000 DACA recipients, and another 300,000 people who had overstayed their temporary permission to be in the U.S. – but Republicans in the Senate tried to make it look like those voices were a minority of the GOP. “All members of Congress should take this proposal seriously,” said Sen. David Perdue (R-GA). “I will absolutely vote for this proposal,” said Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS). The irony of the President’s immigration proposals weren’t lost on Democrats – as the Trump Administration has tried to end protections for DACA recipients, and targeted hundreds of thousands of others with “Temporary Protective Status” for deportation. “The President cancelled DACA. He stopped TPS,” said Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI). “He got us into this mess.” “Once again, Trump is trying to find leverage with problems that he created. No deal,” said Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR). The president tried to end DACA in 2017. He slashed and ended TPS protections in 2018. In December, he shut down the government. Using people as leverage is immoral. Reopen the government now. — Kamala Harris (@KamalaHarris) January 20, 2019 “Stop holding federal employees hostage and stop holding the young people in DACA hostage,” said Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT). As for the actual legislative details of the President’s plan, those still weren’t available on Sunday, but Politico reported that the plan may also include over $12 billion in hurricane and wildfire disaster relief, along with other spending provisions – all of that would need 60 votes to advance in the Senate. The House and Senate are not in session on Monday, because of the federal holiday for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This was originally a legislative break week for Congress, but now will be ground zero for the fight over the border wall and the partial shutdown. If no final deal is reached this week, 800,000 federal workers would miss a second paycheck on Friday, January 25.
  • With a partial government shutdown extending into a fifth week, President Donald Trump on Saturday offered a deal to Democrats on immigration, setting out a plan which provides $5.7 billion for border security measures which he wants – with some of that money going to build a border wall – in exchange for temporary protection for two different classes of immigrants in the United States, an exchange which was quickly labeled a non-starter by top Democrats in Congress. “I am here today to break the logjam,” Mr. Trump said in his speech, as he said his new plan would be voted on next week in the U.S. Senate. “This is a common sense compromise both parties should embrace,” the President added in his remarks from the White House. “Everyone has made their point — now it’s time to make a law,” said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. “I intend to move to this legislation this week.” 'As a candidate for President I promised I would fix this crisis, and I intend to keep that promise one way or the other,' President Trump says in a national address on border security https://t.co/PkxaI92qXK pic.twitter.com/uK4n43tybw — CNN Politics (@CNNPolitics) January 19, 2019 The plan offered by the President has two main compromise items, one is a bipartisan legislative effort known as the “BRIDGE ACT” – would only be a temporary solution for those known as “Dreamers” – offering them a three-year protected status in the United States, but not resolving any question about a longer-term pathway to U.S. citizenship. The President is also offering to extend protections for certain immigrants and refugees who have come to the U.S. under a “Temporary Protected Status” or TPS, and have remained in the United States longer than originally envisioned. That’s a change from last year, when the Trump Administration moved to send back thousands of people to their home countries – Nicaragua, Haiti, El Salvador, and Sudan – ending an extended temporary protection for those who had come to the United States – but a federal court put that move by the President on hold in October. It was the first major offer made by the President since this impasse began before Christmas, as Mr. Trump had previously waved off efforts by some GOP lawmakers to add provisions dealing with DACA and other programs which helped illegal immigrants in the United States. But his Saturday speech did little to sway Democratic leaders in Congress. “It is unlikely that any one of these provisions alone would pass the House, and taken together, they are a non-starter,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, as she and other Democrats said the immigration offers were temporary, while the wall was permanent. “Unfortunately, the president doesn’t understand that an honest negotiation can’t take place while he’s holding the government hostage,” said Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-CA). Democrats were hopeful that @realDonaldTrump was finally willing to re-open government & proceed with a much-needed discussion to protect the border. Unfortunately, reports make clear that his proposal is a compilation of previously rejected initiatives. https://t.co/MFwebWSevG pic.twitter.com/yMTm4iP27h — Nancy Pelosi (@SpeakerPelosi) January 19, 2019 “You don’t negotiate a compromise with your own Vice President and your son in law,” said Sen. Brian Schatz (D-HI), as Democrats noted there have been no direct talks in almost two weeks. “That’s not how this works.” “No genuine path to citizenship for dreamers, more intransigent insistence on an ineffective, impractical wall—nothing new from Trump today,” said Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT). Republicans said the Democrats should accept the President’s offer, as both sides pointed the shutdown finger of blame at each other on the 29th day of the border security impasse, which began back before Christmas, when Republicans controlled both the House and Senate. “The President has made a very reasonable offer to extend DACA and TPS protections in exchange for the border security measures he supports,” said Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL). “Democrats have yet to make a single legitimate counteroffer throughout the last month the government has been shut down,” said Rep. Steve Scalise (R-LA). “This is an important step in the right direction to restart negotiations,” said Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-NY), who has broken repeatedly with GOP leaders and the White House to vote for Democratic plans to re-open the government. Mr. Trump’s plan also includes: + $800 million in humanitarian aid to deal with an influx of illegal immigrants + $805 million for drug detection efforts at major ports of entry + 2,750 new border agents and other law enforcement personnel + 75 new legal teams of immigration judges #Shutdown can only end through mutual concessions that lead to an agreement. It appears @POTUS will offer concessions this afternoon. I hope Democrats won’t just automatically reject his offer. Demanding his unconditional surrender is not a reasonable position. — Marco Rubio (@marcorubio) January 19, 2019 But the plan also ran into opposition from some voices on the conservative right as well. 100 miles of border wall in exchange for amnestying millions of illegals. So if we grant citizenship to a BILLION foreigners, maybe we can finally get a full border wall. — Ann Coulter (@AnnCoulter) January 19, 2019
  • After yet another day which featured no hints of progress in ending a funding fight that has to a partial government shutdown taking paychecks away from over 800,000 federal workers, President Donald Trump tweeted on Friday evening that he would make a ‘major announcement’ on Saturday about his push to get money to build a wall along the Mexican border, which has led to an ongoing standoff with Democrats in Congress. “I will be making a major announcement concerning the Humanitarian Crisis on our Southern Border, and the Shutdown,” the President wrote on Twitter, giving no details about what he might announce. With no indications that Democrats in Congress are ready to give in on their opposition to a border wall, some Republicans have continued to urge the President to declare a ‘national emergency’ under existing laws, and move money around in the military’s budget to build a wall. I will be making a major announcement concerning the Humanitarian Crisis on our Southern Border, and the Shutdown, tomorrow afternoon at 3 P.M., live from the @WhiteHouse. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 18, 2019 “He ought to go ahead and declare an emergency, and it would be over,” said Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-OK). “I don’t know why he is reluctant to do that.” Inhofe – who chairs the Senate Armed Services Committee – said Thursday that he would not oppose the President dipping into military construction funds to build the wall, though other Republicans have publicly opposed the idea. Democrats on Friday also pressed the Department of Homeland Security on another front – using eminent domain to take land away from landowners, in order to build the way – focusing on a case involving the Catholic Church in Texas, which owns land that the Trump Administration wants. “The federal government must exercise extreme caution when seizing private property,” wrote Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer to the Homeland Security Secretary. To @SecNielsen: The Trump Administration’s lawsuit against the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brownsville, Texas, raises important questions on the exercise of eminent domain to build a border wall. We ask you to respond to these questions by January 31: pic.twitter.com/MXcfoQib9E — Chuck Schumer (@SenSchumer) January 18, 2019 The President has asked for $5.7 billion in border security money for both fencing and a wall; Democrats in Congress have offered $1.6 billion – the original requests of the Trump Administration and Republicans – but Democrats want none of that to go to the wall.
  • Lawmakers in the U.S. House and Senate went home for a federal holiday weekend with no hints of any deal in a continuing dispute over President Donald Trump’s demand for money to build his border wall, as Democrats in the House vowed more votes on bills to end a funding lapse which started before Christmas, while Senate Republicans continued to refuse to hold any votes before there’s a deal on border funding with the President. “I feel like this has been a wasted week,” said Sen. David Perdue (R-GA), a key Senate ally of President Trump, who like other lawmakers saw no evidence that a deal was near, four weeks into the shutdown. “I don’t feel like there’s been much progress at all,” Perdue added. Democrats certainly endorsed that assessment – while pointing the finger of blame directly at Senate Republicans, criticising the GOP for not allowing votes on any of the eight funding bills approved by the House to re-open shuttered agencies, send hundreds of thousands of employees back to work, and ensure they will be paid as well. “We are talking about millions of people’s paychecks being held hostage for a border wall that the American public doesn’t support,” said Sen. Tom Udall (D-NM). Day 27: I just directly requested passage of a bill to reopen the government. Senator McConnell refused. Impossible to overstate exactly how ridiculous and offensive — not to mention unnecessary — this continuing shutdown is. — Tim Kaine (@timkaine) January 17, 2019 “If we are going to pay them (federal workers) anyway — if the Federal Treasury is going to write that check — wouldn’t it be better if they are in their offices answering phones, processing food stamp applications, and serving their fellow Americans than locked out of their offices?” asked Sen. Tim Kaine (D-VA). Kaine vowed to force the Senate to be in session on Saturday to drive home Democratic Party arguments about the need to end the shutdown – and to reinforce how Republicans have not allowed any votes yet in 2019 on bills to fund the government. “I don’t understand how this chamber can stand by and watch the devastating effects of this shutdown on our nation,” said Udall on the Senate floor, as he joined Kaine in urging Republicans to allow votes to re-open the National Park Service and other agencies. Kaine on Thursday forced the Senate Majority Leader to object to a procedural effort to debate and vote on funding for the government; a few hours later, McConnell met for close to an hour at the Capitol with Vice President Mike Pence, and the President’s son-in-law Jared Kushner. McConnell told reporters afterwards there was no deal to announce. House Democrats planned several more votes next week on bills to fund the government, as they scrapped a planned break because of the shutdown. Hundreds of thousands of federal workers haven’t been paid yet in 2019 and some are taking on second jobs to make ends meet. Enough with the stalling @SenateMajLdr. Stop blocking the Senate vote and let's finally end this shutdown. https://t.co/ZfwHYGNQJY — Ro Khanna (@RoKhanna) January 18, 2019 With a federal holiday on Monday for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., it wasn’t hard to imagine the shutdown continuing through most – if not all – of next week, and that could mean a second missed paycheck for federal workers, most of whom are scheduled to be paid on January 25. The first missed check was a week ago on January 11. Some Republicans again suggested the way out was for President Trump to declare a national emergency, and try to move money around in the federal budget to support a border wall. “I have no idea how long it’s going to go,” Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-OK) said of the shutdown, arguing the national emergency declaration might be the best move for everyone. “To me, he could use an emergency, and it would be over,” Inhofe said.
  • A day after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi suggested that President Donald Trump delay his State of the Union Address because of unresolved issues surrounding a partial government shutdown, the President retaliated by scrapping plans by the Speaker to take a group of lawmakers on an overseas trip to Belgium, Egypt and Afghanistan, saying it would be better for Pelosi to stay in the U.S. and negotiate a deal on a border wall. “In light of the 800,000 great American workers not receiving pay, I am sure you would agree that postponing this public relations event is totally appropriate,” the President wrote in a letter to the Speaker. “Obviously, if you would like to make your journey by flying commercial, that would certainly be your prerogative,” the President added, as he took the unprecedented step of pulling military support for what are known as “CODEL’s” – bipartisan Congressional Delegation trips. A day after she all but disinvited him from delivering the State of the Union address, Trump tells Pelosi he is canceling her trip to Belgium, Egypt and Afghanistan, citing the shutdown. The executive branch traditionally provides military transport for congressional trips. — Peter Baker (@peterbakernyt) January 17, 2019 Earlier in the day, the Speaker had told reporters she had not yet received a response from the White House to her suggestion of a postponement of the State of the Union. “I’m not denying him a platform at all,” Pelosi told reporters at her weekly news conference. “I’m saying let’s get a date when the government is open.”
  • For the eighth time in two weeks, Congress on Thursday went through a familiar round of arguments as the House approved a bill to re-open federal agencies which lost funding before Christmas, with Democrats demanding that Senate Republicans consider those measures to end a partial government shutdown, while GOP Senators said they would not act until there was an agreement on funding for the border wall backed by President Donald Trump. “What a stupid way to run a business,” said House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, as Democrats accused Senate Republicans of abdicating their constitutional responsibilities. “The House of Representatives is in a perpetual cycle of Groundhog Day,” said Rep. Debbie Lesko (R-AZ), as Republicans again said until Democrats give wall funding to the President, there is no reason for any votes on bills to end the partial government shutdown. “This is all just theater, this is all just political theater,” said Rep. Scott Perry (R-PA), as Republicans remained steadfast in saying they would not vote to re-open the government until the President had his wall money, while Democrats said they would not negotiate on border security funding until the government was open again. Democrats continued to partly blame Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell for the impasse, imploring him to allow the House-passed government funding bills to be considered on the Senate floor. Again and again the @HouseDemocrats have put forward bills to reopen the gov only to have the Senate GOP block them because they would rather back Trump than let workers receive the pay that they’ve earned. This level of obstruction is absurd. Stop choosing politics over people. https://t.co/Rfw3j9RCWb — Rep. Ted Deutch (@RepTedDeutch) January 17, 2019 Off the floors of the House and Senate, there were no indications in the hallways of the Capitol of any developing negotiations between Democrats and the White House, as after 27 days of a partial shutdown, it was obvious that the standoff would go into the weekend, and into next week. “Almost everybody wants to secure the border, almost everybody wants to open up government,” said Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL). “What can’t it happen?” Democrats said the reason was in the Senate, where after two weeks of the 116th Congress, no funding bills had yet been brought to the floor, even as over 800,000 federal workers missed one paycheck last week, and were in danger of missing another on January 25. “The people want the wall, the people want border security,” said Rep. Chuck Fleischmann (R-TN), as there was no evidence that GOP lawmakers were going to break from the President, leaving the stalemate in place, with federal workers around the country – some working, some not – waiting to be paid. “I’m not for a wall,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said, as Democrats showed no evidence of any split, either. “I’m concerned about workers not having any paychecks.” The President and Republicans are asking for $5.7 billion for border security—just one-tenth of 1% of the federal budget. — Kevin McCarthy (@GOPLeader) January 17, 2019 Meanwhile, the Trump Administration called back more workers on Thursday at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, to work on needed paperwork for farmers around the nation. “Not knowing when I go back to work is starting to get a bit old,” one idled federal worker told me. And for now, it looks like the shutdown is not going to be over anytime soon. . @SpeakerPelosi: “I’m not for a wall. I’m not for a wall. I’m not for a wall.” pic.twitter.com/TTqMPoOUai — CSPAN (@cspan) January 17, 2019 “A wall has to be built,” the President said in a speech at the Pentagon.
  • Jamie  Dupree

    Jamie Dupree is the Radio News Director of the Washington Bureau of the Cox Media Group and writes the Washington Insider blog.A native of Washington, D.C., Jamie has covered Congress and politics in the nation’s capital since the Reagan Administration, and has been reporting for Cox since 1989. Politics and the Congress are in Jamie’s family, as both of his parents were staffers for members of Congress. He was also a page and intern in the House of Representatives. Jamie has covered 11 national political conventions, with his first being the 1988 Democratic Convention in Atlanta. His political travels have had him on the presidential campaign trail every four years since 1992, chasing candidates throughout the primary calendar.He is heard on Cox Radio stations around the country: WSB-AM Atlanta, WDBO-AM Orlando; WOKV-AM/FM Jacksonville; WHIO-AM/FM Dayton, Ohio; and KRMG-AM Tulsa, Oklahoma.Jamie and his wife Emily live just outside the Beltway with their three children. Some may know Jamie from his other on-air hobby, as he is a licensed amateur radio operator. When not at work or playing with his kids, you can often find him with a golf club in his hands.Follow Jamie on Twitter and Google+

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News

  • Producers of the Pepsi Super Bowl LIII Halftime Show are looking for people to participate in the halftime show at Mercedes-Benz Stadium on Feb. 3. About 450 people are needed to be part of the “Field Team” that will help move the halftime show stages and scenic elements on and off the field. Maroon 5, Big Boi and Travis Scott are headlining the Super Bowl LIII Halftime Show. Our LIVE Team 2 Coverage of Super Bowl LIII continues on Channel 2 Action News starting at 4 p.m. We're getting a behind-the-scenes look at the Super Bowl Experience + talking with cyber security experts working to keep you and the city safe. “Field Team” members must be able to attend all scheduled rehearsals, be over the age of 18 and be in good physical health. No prior experience is required. Anyone interested in applying can view the rehearsal schedule HERE. If it fits your schedule, CLICK HERE to apply for a position. NOTE: “Field Team” members will not receive tickets or the opportunity to watch the Super Bowl. However, they will be an integral part of the halftime show.
  • A man identified by authorities Tuesday as the suspect in the fatal shooting of a teenager at a suburban Chicago mall was previously convicted of armed robbery and had been an acquaintance of the victim. Orland Park Police identified the suspect as 19-year-old parolee Jakharr Williams of University Park. The department said in a news release that Williams, who fled after the shooting and has not been arrested, should be considered armed and dangerous. Police said Williams and 18-year-old Javon Britten of Richton Park were arguing in a food court at Orland Square Mall Monday when Williams allegedly pulled out a handgun and fired several shots. Britten was struck and a bystander's leg was grazed by a bullet. Police said Britten staggered to a nearby clothing store, where he collapsed. He was pronounced dead at Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn a short time later. According to the Illinois Department of Corrections website and Orland Park Police, Williams was convicted of armed robbery in 2017, and that he served a little more than a year in prison before he was released in June last year. Orland Park is about 20 miles (32 kilometers) southwest of Chicago.
  • In the legal equivalent of a Hail Mary pass, two New Orleans Saints season ticket holders have asked a judge to reverse the result of the NFC championship game that sent the Los Angeles Rams to the Super Bowl — or order a do-over. Tuesday's state court filing says NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell should implement a league rule governing 'extraordinarily unfair acts.' Remedies include reversal of a game's result or the rescheduling of a game — in its entirety or from the point when the act occurred. At issue is the failure of officials to call interference or roughness penalties when a Rams player leveled a Saints receiver with a helmet-to-helmet hit at a crucial point in Sunday's game. The NFL hasn't yet responded. A hearing is scheduled Monday.
  • A man is under arrest in Utah after police say he posted on Facebook about 'killing as many girls as I see' the same weekend that Women's Marches were held around the U.S. Christopher W. Cleary, 27, wrote he wanted to be 'the next mass shooter,' because he had never had a girlfriend and he was still a virgin, according to jail documents filed by police in the city of Provo. He wanted to 'make it right' with women who had turned him down and also said 'there's nothing more dangerous than a man ready to die,' the documents said. Cleary is from Denver and Colorado police on Saturday contacted officers in Provo, south of Salt Lake City, where Cleary had checked into an AirBnB rental a day earlier. With help from the FBI, officers tracked Cleary to a restaurant and arrested him on suspicion of a felony threat of terrorism charge. The posts did not mention the marches but investigators were concerned because they were happening that day in Provo and Salt Lake City, along with dozens of other cities, the documents said. Cleary acknowledged making the posts, but said he deleted them after receiving threats in response, police said. He told investigators he had an impulse-control disorder and was suicidal. Colorado authorities said Cleary is on probation after stalking and threatening women there, according to Utah police documents. He was being held without bail in Utah, and authorities were expected to seek his extradition to Colorado. No attorney or publicly listed phone number was immediately available for Cleary.
  • Country singer John Berry revealed he is battling tonsil cancer, Billboard reported Tuesday. Berry, 59, announced the cancer in a video he recorded with his wife, Robin Berry, and posted to his Facebook page.  “We started off this year with a hiccup, and we want to tell you a little bit about that,” John Berry said in the video.  It is not the first time Berry has experienced a medical scare. On the day his song “Your Love Amazes Me” hit No. 1 in 1994, Berry had surgery to remove a benign brain tumor, Billboard reported. Berry said he became aware of his latest health issue in November before his latest tour, the magazine reported.“I had a little catch in my throat, it felt like, it felt exactly like, the skin of a Spanish peanut was stuck in my throat,” Berry said in the video.  After examining his tonsils Berry noticed they were swollen. Despite going to a doctor and receiving steroids and antibiotics, the problem persisted, Berry said. He completed his tour and then saw a doctor Jan. 4, Rolling Stone reported. A CT scan revealed two tumors in his tonsils, so he had surgery to remove them, the magazine reported. After receiving biopsy results, doctors told Berry he had tonsil cancer. Berry will begin a five-week chemotherapy and radiation treatment plan this week, Rolling Stone reported. “This particular cancer is one of the most highly treatable, and has an incredible cure rate,” Berry said in his video. According to his website, Berry had 20 singles on the country charts during the 1990s, six of which were Top 5 songs. He won a Grammy Award in 1996 for his participation in “Amazing Grace: A Country Salute to Gospel, Vol. 1.”
  • Atlanta police are investigating a sexual assault at Opera nightclub after video of the incident was posted on Facebook.  >> Read more trending news Officer Jarius Daugherty said the Atlanta Police Department began receiving calls from people who had seen the assault on a Facebook Live video early Sunday morning. The police department has opened an investigation into the incident at the club on Crescent Avenue in Midtown. The video “appears to show a woman being sexually assaulted in a local nightclub,” Daugherty told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.  Police have not released details on the alleged assault, but the woman filed a police report on the crime. It is the policy of the AJC to not name victims of sexual crimes. According to WSB-TV, the victim was celebrating her birthday Saturday at the popular Midtown nightclub when she was sexually assaulted. The woman told police someone put drugs in her drink and then sexually assaulted her on the dance floor, WSB-TV reported. The victim, who was already streaming her celebration on Facebook Live, captured the attack as it happened and continued to stream the video. According to media reports, the woman is heard in the video screaming for help. Video of the sexual assault has since been removed from Facebook. The woman later posted a video saying she is OK, WSB-TV reported.  In a statement posted to Facebook and Twitter, Opera nightclub managers said they are cooperating with the investigation.  “At this time we have met with the Atlanta Police Department and have provided them with everything they have requested,” read the statement posted Sunday. “We will continue to aid and support their investigation in any way we can.”