ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
86°
Chance of T-storms
H 84° L 69°
  • cloudy-day
    86°
    Current Conditions
    Chance of T-storms. H 84° L 69°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    84°
    Today
    Chance of T-storms. H 84° L 69°
  • cloudy-day
    85°
    Tomorrow
    Partly Cloudy. H 85° L 66°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Latest from Jamie Dupree

    In my almost thirty five years as a reporter, there are a couple of questions that seem to regularly pop up from listeners, viewers, and readers, and one of them is how the President of the United States is referred to in the press on a second or third reference in a story. And over the years, it’s been a bipartisan accusation that I am being disrespectful to the President. So, let me try to explain, spurred by a recent Direct Message that I received on Twitter. “Recently, on several occasions, you referred to President Trump as “Mr. Trump.” Is there a basis for the omission of the proper office title?” I was asked. “Is this your practice regarding other elected or appointed individuals? Notwithstanding your practice, would you agree the omission of an official title is disrespectful of the office or position?” As you can see, some people take offense when they hear “Mister” used before the Presidents name. But I consider this a sign of respect, and have used this technique since the Reagan Administration – even though complaints surface from time to time. When you write a story for radio, for TV, or for newspapers, you would start by using “President Donald Trump” or “President Trump.” In my radio news stories – which are especially short, at less than thirty seconds, you would not want to repeatedly say “President Trump” on a second and third reference – because it doesn’t sound good. So, you mix it up like this on radio: The White House says that President Trump has doubled tariffs on imported steel and aluminum from the nation of Turkey. The higher duties come as the President spars with the Turkish leader over an American pastor who is being held by authorities in Turkey. Mr. Trump thought had had a deal last month to win the pastor’s freedom, but he was not released. In just over 20 seconds in this radio script, you have referred to the President three times, and used “Mr. Trump” in a way that you would not do for anyone else. This is a sign of respect. No one else gets that kind of treatment. Not the Vice President. Not Governors. Not Senators. Just open your local newspaper. You will see that most news organizations (other than the New York Times) do not use “Mr.” on a second or third reference – they just say “Trump.” I don’t like that. The holder of the office deserves more respect, and gets that with 1) President Trump, 2) the President, and 3) Mr. Trump. As you can see from the past on Twitter, the criticism on “Mr.” is bipartisan: @jamiedupree 'Mr Obama?' Really what other president do you refer to as 'Mr?' — Andrea Baker (@AndreaEBaker) May 1, 2015 Waaasss listening to @Jamiedupree but he referred to the POTUS as Mr. Obama. #lackofrespect .done. — anomaly (@Le_BronzeJames) July 12, 2011 Why do you refer to the President as Mr Obama instead of President Obama? @jamiedupree — rosierifka (@rosierifka) June 20, 2014 How do others deal with this? For example, check out this story from earlier this year by Fox News: In that story, Fox News refers to President Trump, and then after that, only calls him “Trump” or “the president.” Check your local paper. Or read something on the web – see how they do it. My answer is that “Mr. Trump” is a show of respect for the office holder. Just like “Mr. Obama,” and “Mr. Bush,” and “Mr. Clinton,” and “Mr. Bush,” and “Mr. Reagan.” I have done it that way since the mid-1980’s. But it always seems to ruffle some feathers along the way.  
  • With less than three months until the mid-term elections for the U.S. House and Senate, four more states hold primaries today for the Congress, but the roster of races is unlikely to produce the news associated with last week’s tight race in a special U.S. House election in Ohio, which amplified questions about whether the GOP can maintain control of Capitol Hill after November. Primaries take place on Tuesday in four states: Connecticut, Minnesota, Vermont and Wisconsin. No sitting incumbents in the Congress are on upset alert at this point – though there could always be some out-of-the-blue defeat that no one saw coming; but really, this is more about setting the roster for the final races in November. At this point in time, the Congressional change for November is 57 seats in the House, and 3 in the Senate. (Please note that various news organizations calculate these numbers differently.) As you can see from the data, the total change is already equal to that for the House in the 2016 election cycle, as a large amount of turnover continues in the Congress. Most people don’t realize that currently in the U.S. House, almost 200 of the 435 seats are held by lawmakers who were elected since 2012 – that number will grow substantially after the 2018 elections. In the Senate, fully half of Senators have less than eight years in office, just over one term. The primaries for 2018 are rapidly coming to an end – next Tuesday brings Alaska and Wyoming; Arizona and Florida vote on August 28. Then, after Labor Day, Massachusetts, Delaware, New Hampshire, Rhode Island finish out the primaries for the 2018 mid-term elections for Congress. November is not that far away.
  • Three days after being charged by federal prosecutors with insider trading and lying to the FBI, Rep. Chris Collins (R-NY) announced on Saturday that he would end his campaign for another term in the Congress. “After extensive discussions with my family and my friends over the last few days, I have decided that it is in the best interest of my constituents of NY-27, the Republican Party and President Trump’s agenda for me to suspend my campaign for re-election to Congress,” Collins wrote in a statement on Twitter. Collins said he would serve out the rest of his term, which expires in early January of 2019, while also fighting what he labeled the ‘meritless’ charges filed this week by federal prosecutors, who allege that Collins used inside information about a biotech firm to tip off his son and others about non-public information, allowing them to sell the company’s stock in order to avoid financial losses . pic.twitter.com/a3N8tKFpuU — Rep. Chris Collins (@RepChrisCollins) August 11, 2018 Collins had initially told reporters on Thursday evening in Buffalo that he would stay in the race for Congress. “I will mount a vigorous defense,” Collins said, with his wife standing at his side. But the announcement today doesn’t mean that name of the three-term incumbent will be taken off the ballot in New York, as the election laws in the Empire State would make that rather complicated. One possible choice is for the state Republican Party to put Collins on the ballot in another race, as the Buffalo News reported that Collins’ name could only be taken off the ballot by what the newspaper described as a “series of political maneuvers rarely – if ever – used in all of New York.” In re: Collins, it continues to be difficult to get him off the ballot. Curious to see how that might happen. — Kyle Kondik (@kkondik) August 11, 2018
  • The Treasury Department reported Friday that the federal government ran a budget deficit of $76.9 billion in the month of July, as federal revenues were down from a year ago, while government spending was up, keeping Fiscal Year 2017 headed in the direction of the largest yearly deficit since 2012. Added to the red ink totaled up so far, the deficit so far for 2017 is at $683 billion, already ahead of the total for all of 2016, when it hit $665.8 billion. For the first ten months of this fiscal year, Uncle Sam has run up $127 billion more in defcits – at this same point a year ago, the yearly budget deficit stood at $566 billion. The current fiscal year ends on September 30. The U.S. government’s budget deficit was $76.87 billion in July, 79% wider than July 2017’s deficit. https://t.co/PKYpd5VdJO — Capital Journal (@WSJPolitics) August 10, 2018 The budget figures also continued a trend since the approval of a major tax cut plan at the end of this year, as revenues in July were again down from the same month a year ago. Since withholding tax tables were changed in February to account for higher take home pay – and less in taxes withheld by the government – revenues have been lower on a month-to-month comparison in each month except for April. Individual income tax receipts – while down from last July – are still running ahead of last year. Corporate income taxes are well behind a year ago, as just $4.3 billion in corporate taxes were collected last month, running overall almost $70 billion behind the same point a year ago. While total revenues coming in to Uncle Sam declined by $7 billion in July, spending by the federal government was up $28 billion from a year earlier. In June, the White House estimated the budget deficit for this year would be $890 billion, and would go over $1 trillion for the three years after that.
  • A Special Master who waded through evidence seized in an April 9 raid on the ex-personal lawyer of President Donald Trump said Thursday that she had finished reviewing documents and other materials that had been the subject of attorney-client privilege claims, keeping some items private, but delivering the vast majority to federal prosecutors for their review. In a document submitted to a federal judge on Thursday, retired federal judge Barbara Jones said simply, “the Special Master has concluded her review.” Indicating that all evidence legally available to prosecutors has been handed over, she said one final release of 2,558 items ‘designated “not privileged” and/or “not highly personal” has been made to the Government,’ Jones wrote. New: The special master in SDNY's Michael Cohen investigation has filed her sixth and final update of the material seized in the April FBI searches. The filing says the special master has now concluded her review. — erica orden (@eorden) August 9, 2018 With most of that evidence from the Cohen raid – which was denounced by the President back in April – now in the hands of federal prosecutors, the question is what will federal prosecutors do with that information – and will it lead to any charges being brought against Cohen, or possibly lead to any investigative actions involving President Trump. While no details have officially been released by either the Special Master or the court about the evidence, at least one item is a tape recording that Cohen made of a conversation he had with the President just before the 2016 election, concerning payments to a woman who claimed she had an affair with Mr. Trump. “Just as Richard Nixon learned, tapes don’t lie,” Cohen’s new lawyer Lanny Davis said several weeks ago, as the Cohen and Trump teams battled over whether the tape showed Mr. Trump had said to pay the woman in cash. Truth is once again on @MichaelCohen212 side. @POTUS @realDonaldTrump used the word cash, despite @RudyGiuliani falsely accusing Mr. Cohen. Just as Richard Nixon learned, tapes don’t lie! — Lanny Davis (@LannyDavis) July 25, 2018 Reports have indicated that Cohen could be under investigation for campaign finance law violations involving such payments, and that he also may be under investigation for tax fraud – but no charges have been made against Cohen, who for years operated as Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer and ‘fixer.’ Cohen has been quiet in recent weeks, after giving interviews and making statements which made clear his loyalty was to his family and country – not to President Trump. Mr. Trump has not tweeted about Cohen since early May, when the President tried to explain away Cohen’s legal work dealing with women who said they had an affair, saying there was no link to the 2016 elections. “Mr. Cohen, an attorney, received a monthly retainer, not from the campaign and having nothing to do with the campaign, from which he entered into, through reimbursement, a private contract between two parties, known as a non-disclosure agreement, or NDA,” the President tweeted on May 3.
  • As Vice President Mike Pence told a Pentagon audience on Thursday that a new branch of the military known as the “Space Force” should be set up by 2020, the Congress has yet to approve the creation of such a plan. “Establishing a Space Force is an idea whose time has come,” the Vice President said in a speech. “What was once peaceful and uncontested, is now crowded and adversarial,” the Vice President added, making the case for a sixth branch of the military to deal solely with threats in space. “We must have American dominance in space,” Pence declared. . @VP Pence: 'The time has come to establish the United States Space Force.' pic.twitter.com/MUsZD1NcEA — CSPAN (@cspan) August 9, 2018 But on Monday, when President Donald Trump signs a major defense policy bill into law, during a trip to Fort Drum in New York, that piece of legislation will not contain any language to create a space force, as lawmakers remain cool to the idea. The plan does require a provision for the Defense Secretary to develop a ‘warfighting policy’ in space by March of 2019, noting that U.S. “national security satellites face growing threats from potential adversary attacks, such as anti-satellite weapons or jamming.” The initial estimate out of the White House is that setting up a new “Space Force” would cost $8 billion over five years, as the Vice President compared it to previous military expansion in the history of the United States. “Just as in the past when we established an Air Force, the idea of establishing a Space Force is an idea whose time has come,” the Vice President added. Space Force all the way! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 9, 2018 “Maybe we should rename Medicaid Expansion “Space Force” and we could save lives,” said Sen. Brian Schatz (D-HI). “Space Force is a silly but dangerous idea.” What will happen now is a report from the Pentagon, in a bid to set out a multi-year process to create the Space Force – still a long shot on Capitol Hill.
  • As a Republican Congressman from New York was indicted Wednesday on charges of insider trading and lying to the FBI, Democrats in Congress turned up the volume on a throwback political argument which helped them win control of the Congress in 2006, again pressing the case that voters should toss Republicans out of office, arguing the ‘swamp’ is filled by GOP lawmakers and Republican officials who are corrupt. “The American people deserve better than the GOP’s corruption, cronyism, and incompetence,” said House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi, as securities fraud and insider trading charges were unveiled on Wednesday against Rep. Chris Collins (R-NY). “The charges against Congressman Collins show the rampant culture of corruption and self-enrichment among Republicans in Washington today,” Pelosi added in a statement. Much as President Donald Trump used the phrase “Drain the Swamp” over the past few years at his rallies, Democrats say it doesn’t take much to see Republican wrongdoing in that ‘swamp.’ “I think it’s obviously very, very disappointing,” Democratic Rep. David Cicilline says of Rep. Collins' indictment. “I think it feeds into the narrative, sadly, that we’re seeing so much from this administration and Republicans in Congress, this culture of corruption' pic.twitter.com/al2cVxXERm — CNN Politics (@CNNPolitics) August 8, 2018 “Trump, Collins, Pruitt, Price, Flynn, Manafort, Gates, Kushner,” said Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI). “It’s not a coincidence, it’s a pattern of people putting themselves first and our country second.” “This is what corruption looks like,” said Rep. Jim McGovern (D-MA) after the Collins indictment. As for Collins, he vigorously denied any wrongdoing in a statement hours after pleading not guilty to federal charges. “The charges that have been levied against me are meritless,” Collins said of the 22 page complaint brought by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, which was chock full of evidence that showed Collins tipping off his son, who then told his girlfriend and her family, as they all sold stock in an Australian biotech firm before news of a failed drug trial sent the stock plummeting in value. “I will mount a vigorous defense in court to clear my name,” said Collins, who said he would remain on the ballot for November, and would not give up his bid for re-election in western New York. Rep. Chris Collins: 'The charges that have been levied against me are meritless and I will mount a vigorous defense in court to clear my name.' https://t.co/wokE4EXvtx pic.twitter.com/sIiZDZCvID — ABC News Politics (@ABCPolitics) August 9, 2018 Even before the indictment of Rep. Collins, Democrats felt that they had no shortage of stories and targets to highlight on the campaign trail when it comes to questions of ethics, without even bringing up the probe of Russian interference in the 2016 elections. Some of the examples they raise: + The multiple investigations of now former EPA chief Scott Pruitt. + A number of ongoing investigations of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. + Financial questions about Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. + Excessive use of military planes for travel by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. + Questions about President Trump’s businesses. + Ex-Rep. Blake Farenthold (R-TX), who resigned without paying back an $84,000 harassment settlement. + Rep. Patrick Meehan (R-PA), who resigned after disclosure of a sexual harassment claim. + The resignation of Rep. Tim Murphy (R-PA), who reportedly asked his mistress to consider an abortion (she did not get pregnant). + Excessive travel costs run up by former HHS Secretary Tom Price. + Travel costs involving former VA Secretary David Shulkin, which included Shulkin’s chief of staff doctoring evidence presented to internal investigators. + HUD Secretary Ben Carson’s $31,000 dining room set. + The head of the CDC resigning after it was revealed that she bought tobacco stocks soon after taking her federal health job. + Questions about stock purchases by ex-Rep. Tom Price (R-GA), which included buying the same stock involved in the Collins case. “The Collins indictment represents everything Trump and his Republican allies in Congress have stood for since taking office,” said Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR). I am not clever enough to make a “drain the swamp” pun/retort so I will just say wow these guys are so corrupt and the only remedy is to throw them out of office. — Brian Schatz (@brianschatz) August 8, 2018 For some on Capitol Hill, it’s a throwback to 2006, when Republicans in Congress seemed to melt down before the mid-term elections with a number of ethical problems, highlighted by the resignation of Rep. Mark Foley (R-FL), after questions surfaced over his contacts with teenage House Pages. And with the 2018 elections not far off, Democrats have clearly decided to press the ‘culture of corruption’ argument, in hopes that it can help them regain the majority in Congress in November.    
  • In an investigation into investments in an Australian biotech firm, federal prosecutors have charged Rep. Chris Collins (R-NY), his son, and his son’s father-in-law with conspiracy and securities fraud, alleging that they used inside information to shield themselves from major financial losses. Collins, one of the staunchest allies of President Donald Trump in the Congress, was also charged with lying to the FBI during an April 2018 interview, as prosecutors charge that he relayed information about a failed drug trial by the company, Innate Immunotherapuetics. “We are confident he will be completely vindicated and exonerated,” attorneys for Collins said in a statement issued before his arraignment. STATEMENT: Attorneys for Rep. Collins Respond to Charges Filed Today https://t.co/rzNnUmyJDd — Rep. Chris Collins (@RepChrisCollins) August 8, 2018 The charges say that the Congressman’s son, Cameron Collins, used information from his father to trade his stock in Innate, and also passed it on to his father-in-law, who forwarded to others as well. “All of the trades preceded the public release of the negative Drug Trial results, and were timed to avoid losses that they would have suffered once the news became public,” the criminal complaint filed by prosecutors read. The feds say Collins found out about the drug trial failure while he was attending the Congressional picnic at the White House in June of 2017. The Congressman did not trade his shares, because of restrictions involving Innate shares in Australia, but he “instead tipped” his son, who quickly moved the next morning ‘to sell approximately 16,508 shares of Innate.” The charges say Cameron Collins not only sold shares, but also tipped off his fiancee, his father-in-law, his mother-in-law, and a friend, allowing them to sell shares in the company, and avoid major financial losses. The Congressman, his son, and his son’s father-in-law also all face charges of making false statements to the FBI, denying that they had been tipped off with any inside information by Rep. Collins about Innate’s drug trial failure. Collins had been under a U.S. House Ethics Committee review over questions about whether he had received inside information about the stock – and there had also been stories about whether he wrongly forwarded information to other lawmakers, who purchased stock as well.
  • In a district that President Donald Trump won by 11 points in 2016, Republicans used a late television ad blitz, along with help from the President and Vice President, to squeak out an apparent special election victory in a Congressional district in central Ohio, still raising questions about what it means more broadly for Republicans in November. With 100 of precincts reporting, GOP State Sen. Troy Balderson led by 1,700 votes over Democrat Danny O’Connor; as of late Tuesday night, it still wasn’t clear whether provisional and uncounted absentee ballots could trigger a mandatory recount, if the final margin was less than 0.5 percent. Elections officials said late Tuesday that around 8,400 ballots still had to be counted – but they seemed to come mainly from areas that backed Balderson. “I’m sure Republicans will celebrate tonight, but a 1-point victory in that district is nothing to commend,” said GOP pollster Frank Luntz. If anything, tonight's #OH12 result reinforces our view that Dems are substantial favorites to retake the House in November. — Dave Wasserman (@Redistrict) August 8, 2018 Democrats were more than happy to peddle that line as well. “This district should have been a slam dunk for the GOP,” said Rep. Ben Ray Lujan (D-NM), “and the fact that we are still counting ballots is an ominous sign for their prospects in November.” “Republicans may celebrate a squeaker of a victory but not a single one is resting easy tonight,” said Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), as Democrats pointed to the roster of GOP districts which had less than an 11 point Trump edge in 2016. “Trump is the reason this seat was even competitive,” said election expert Nathan Gonzales. There are 71 GOP-held house seats that have better 2016 presidential margins for Democrats than #OH12 — Daily Kos Elections (@DKElections) August 8, 2018 Still – it was seemingly a win for Republicans, and their side was more than happy to trumpet that fact – even with the final votes still to be counted. “Congratulations to Congressman-Elect Balderson on his hard-fought victory tonight,” said Rep. Steve Stivers (R-OH), who heads the GOP effort to hold on to the U.S. House in November. “Congratulations to Troy Balderson on a great win in Ohio. A very special and important race!” President Trump said from his New Jersey golf retreat. Mr. Trump had held a rally on Saturday night in what turned out to be the key county – Delaware County – which provided Balderson with his lead. “After my speech on Saturday night, there was a big turn for the better. Now Troy wins a great victory during a very tough time of the year for voting,” the President wrote on Twitter. Twitter for the last week – 'What will it mean if Republicans lose OH-12.' Twitter for the next week – 'Well they won BUT….' My view – yes, the GOP has headwinds going into the Fall but a win is a win is a win. There are no points for second place. — Brian Walsh (@brianjameswalsh) August 8, 2018 But others didn’t share the President’s optimism about what it meant for November. “In the end, we’re going to wind up with an incredibly tight race in a Trump +11 district,” said elections expert Brand Allen. “This is not good news for Republicans.” I’ve worked in Ohio presidential and senate races for Republicans and the idea of #oh12 being a close race is sort of like hearing gravity is a regional phenomena. It’s not how the world is suppose to work. https://t.co/waJPaiJb1S — stuart stevens (@stuartpstevens) August 8, 2018 CNN just reported R's spent 5.2M vs Democrats 1M in the district. D's extremely outspent in a Trump +10 districts lose by near recount territory. The spending gap is another part of this story that suggests trouble for R's in November. — Benchmark Politics (@benchmarkpol) August 8, 2018 “Winning really is a big deal here,” said GOP strategist Liam Donovan, “whatever the margins.”
  • The Trump Administration on Tuesday took another step forward in a growing trade battle with China, relasing a final list of almost $16 billion in imports which will be hit with 25 percent import tariffs, carrying out President Donald Trump’s pledge to confront China over unfair trade practices, as the President has threatened such tariffs on over $200 billion in Chinese products. “Customs and Border Protection will begin to collect the additional duties on the Chinese imports on August 23,” the office of the U.S. Trade Representative announced. The list of 279 different import items is extensive in nature, covering everything from lubricating oils to chlorinated synthetic rubber, to sawing machines, fertilizer distributors, railroad axles, multimeters and more. The Chinese government has vowed to match the U.S. tariffs dollar for dollar, as President Trump has made clear he will not back down in his effort to force changes by Beijing. Unlike tariffs that Mr. Trump placed on aluminum and steel imports from Canada, Mexico, and Europe, there is clearly more support in the Congress for trade action against China – even though it may cause economic collateral damage back in the United States. “China steals and uses American trade secrets on a regular basis,” said Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL). “The only way to get China to drop its barriers is to retaliate against them until they do.” #China blatantly cheats & steals & 20 years of playing nice doesn’t work. So what are we supposed to do,unconditional surrender? Here is an idea for fair trade,treat China the way they treat us. Same rules on their products & companies as they have on ours https://t.co/YmMYRrhwma — Marco Rubio (@marcorubio) August 7, 2018 But the latest round of tariffs by the Trump Administration again brought concern from farm groups in the United States, which have been especially vocal in their opposition to new tariffs, worried that agricultural products will be caught in the crossfire, damaging foreign market access for years to come. “We need a change in course on tariffs before they cause any more damage in Minnesota and across rural America,” said Kristin Duncanson, a farmer from Mapleton, Minnesota, as the group Farmers for Free Trade has tried to rally the industry against the President’s tariffs. “Farmers fear the worst,” as the group focused its concerns today on yet another Midwestern state. I spent some time with soybean farmers in rural Illinois getting screwed by Trump's tariffs. They're bracing for economic ruin, but still won't blame Trump for this mess. https://t.co/ouZNsP6WHd — Jennifer Bendery (@jbendery) August 7, 2018 “Trump’s tariffs are putting the livelihood of thousands of hardworking farmers across the heartland at risk,” said Rep. Cheri Bustos (D-IL). But the President sees this issue much differently. “When we make a car and we send it to China, they charge us a 25 percent tax,” the President said at a rally last Saturday in Ohio. “When they make a car and send it to us, we charge them essentially nothing.” “And we’re standing up to China,” Mr. Trump added. “We’re standing up because it’s just been unfair.”
  • Jamie  Dupree

    Jamie Dupree is the Radio News Director of the Washington Bureau of the Cox Media Group and writes the Washington Insider blog.A native of Washington, D.C., Jamie has covered Congress and politics in the nation’s capital since the Reagan Administration, and has been reporting for Cox since 1989. Politics and the Congress are in Jamie’s family, as both of his parents were staffers for members of Congress. He was also a page and intern in the House of Representatives. Jamie has covered 11 national political conventions, with his first being the 1988 Democratic Convention in Atlanta. His political travels have had him on the presidential campaign trail every four years since 1992, chasing candidates throughout the primary calendar.He is heard on Cox Radio stations around the country: WSB-AM Atlanta, WDBO-AM Orlando; WOKV-AM/FM Jacksonville; WHIO-AM/FM Dayton, Ohio; and KRMG-AM Tulsa, Oklahoma.Jamie and his wife Emily live just outside the Beltway with their three children. Some may know Jamie from his other on-air hobby, as he is a licensed amateur radio operator. When not at work or playing with his kids, you can often find him with a golf club in his hands.Follow Jamie on Twitter and Google+

    Read More

News

  • A 61-year-old woman was pinned between her car and a gas pump after a four-car crash at a Lithonia gas station, DeKalb County police said.  Her grandchildren were inside the her car at the time, according to Channel 2 Action News.  The woman was taken to the hospital in critical condition following the Monday evening wreck at the Circle K gas station in the intersection of Covington Highway and Evans Mill Road, DeKalb County spokeswoman Shiera Campbell said.  Campbell said the woman was pumping gas when a gray vehicle sped into the gas station at a high rate of speed. The car crashed into a pick-up truck, causing it to crash into a Nissan SUV, Campbell said. The SUV slammed into the woman’s car, pinning her against the gas pump.  Campbell said the people, believed to be juveniles, inside the gray vehicle ran from the scene.  No other details were released.  In other news:
  • Marlins right-hander Jose Urena has dropped his appeal of a six-game suspension for intentionally hitting Atlanta rookie Ronald Acuna Jr. with a pitch. Urena began serving the suspension Tuesday. The Marlins, fearful the Braves might retaliate, had already decided Urena wouldn't pitch against them during a four-game series later this week. Urena is expected to return at Boston on Aug. 28. He hit Acuna on the left arm with his first pitch, triggering a melee in the Marlins' 5-2 loss in Atlanta last Wednesday. Acuna went into the game having homered in five straight games, including four homers in the three games against Miami — three of them leading off. Acuna left the game injured but was back in the lineup the next day. Urena was ejected. Urena pitched the first complete game of his career last Sunday in a win at Washington. ___ More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • West Virginia's Republican House speaker resigned Tuesday to run for a vacancy on the state Supreme Court, fueling accusations by Democrats that an unprecedented move to impeach state Supreme Court justices represents a power grab by GOP lawmakers. Speaker Tim Armstead disclosed his plans on Twitter. Though the secretary of state's office has said he's not required to resign, Armstead said he was doing so to make sure his candidacy is above question. House lawmakers recently impeached four of the court's five justices, prompting one to resign. All four were ordered Tuesday to appear in the Senate on Sept. 11 to answer accusations against them. The impeachment probe was sparked by questions involving more than $3 million in renovations to the justices' offices and expanded to broader accusations of corruption, incompetence and neglect of duty. Armstead had recused himself from the House debate over impeachment because he had previously expressed interest in serving on the court. More recently, he and U.S. Rep. Evan Jenkins, a Republican who is not seeking re-election and lost in his bid for the U.S. Senate this spring, both applied to be considered for temporary appointments to the Supreme Court by Gov. Jim Justice. Those appointments would last until the November election is certified. Jenkins has declared himself a candidate for a different seat on the court in the November election, which is officially nonpartisan. The West Virginia Democratic Party said on Twitter of Armstead's resignation, 'No surprise here, more self-serving moves for political gain and abandoning the people of West Virginia in his district.' In a statement announcing his resignation, Armstead said he intends 'to spend as much time as possible meeting West Virginians and earning their trust and their votes to represent them on their Supreme Court of Appeals.' Armstead filed by Tuesday's deadline to run in the nonpartisan race for the vacancy created last month when Menis Ketchum retired and agreed to plead guilty to wire fraud related to his personal use of a state vehicle and fuel. Robin Davis stepped down from the court Aug. 14 after lawmakers voted to impeach her and justices Allen Loughry, Margaret Workman and Beth Walker. Davis and at least one Democratic lawmaker have accused the Republican-led legislature of turning what they said was a legitimate pursuit of charges against Loughry into a blatant attempt to take over the court. Democratic Delegate Barbara Evans Fleischauer of Monongalia County has called impeaching the other justices 'a power grab ... and using the impeachment process to take over another branch of government.' Jenkins and six other candidates have filed to run for Davis' seat in November. Armstead and nine other candidates have filed to run for the seat Ketchum vacated. Loughry faces six charges related to accusations of spending $363,000 on office renovations, taking home a $42,000 antique desk owned by the state, and lying to a House committee. Loughry, Walker and Workman all face charges of abusing authority by failing to control office expenses and not maintaining policies about the use of state vehicles, office computers at home and other matters. Workman faces two separate impeachment articles related to accusations that she allowed senior status judges to be paid higher wages than are allowed. Armstead was appointed to a House seat from Kanawha County in 1998 to fill a vacancy and was elected later that year. He served as House minority leader and was named speaker in December 2014 after Republicans gained majority control of both the House and Senate for the first time in eight decades. Some Democrats have said the impeachments were strategically timed by majority Republican lawmakers to allow the governor to name their temporary replacements. 'There's never been any time in history where one branch of government supposedly controls another branch,' Senate Democratic leader Roman Perzioso said Monday. 'And for the governor to be able to appoint people to be replaced, obviously there's that apprehension by a lot of the Democratic senators and House members, too.
  • A man accused of shooting and killing a man in a Walmart parking lot appeared in court Tuesday.  Gwinnett County District Attorney Danny Porter said that while he does believe Troy Hunte killed Fadil Delkic, a refugee from the Bosnian War, in the parking lot of a Snellville Walmart Sunday, he is not convinced there was malice involved. “Clearly there was provocation on both sides, so that's the reason they made that choice,” Porter said. Sunday afternoon, shoppers at the Scenic Highway store were sent into a panic after a shot was fired outside.  “All you saw was everyone running,” witness Robin Reynolds told Channel 2 Action News. [READ MORE: Bosnian War survivor identified as victim in Walmart parking lot shooting] Witnesses said Hunte, his girlfriend and their child were heading into the store as Delkic was driving away. Hunte's girlfriend apparently thought Delkic pulled too close to them in a crosswalk. TRENDING STORIES: Buford schools superintendent recorded in racist rant, lawsuit says Man arrested in death of Mollie Tibbetts details what happened Girl, 15, says police officer sexually assaulted her for hours; GBI investigating The two argued, she slapped Delkic, then police said Hunte shot and killed the Bosnian refugee.  Hunte made his first court appearance Tuesday on what are now voluntary manslaughter charges.   Porter said the charges may change as his team investigates. He hinted Hunte may claim self-defense. “There are two questions in this case. Number one: Was there a right to defend him or his girlfriend? And number two: Was he justified in using deadly force?” Porter said. Delkic is getting a lot of support. An online fundraising effort has taken in $25,000 in less than a day.  Some of Delkic's family are not only asking why the suspect is not charged with murder, but why the woman who first argued with Delkic has not also been charged. “There was a child to consider. There were other issues that taking her into custody at this point was not necessary for the public safety,” Porter said. Porter said the woman is not entirely cleared yet. “That's something that is still under investigation and she may be (charged),” Porter said.
  • Shanann Watts’ father sobbed in a Colorado courtroom Tuesday as a judge recited the charges against his son-in-law -- charges that indicate detectives believe Chris Watts may have killed his children before his pregnant wife returned home from a business trip.  Chris Watts, 33, of Frederick, was charged Monday with nine felony charges: five counts of first-degree murder, including two for killing a child under the age of 12 while the defendant was in a position of trust, one count of unlawful termination of a pregnancy and three counts of tampering with a deceased human body. He is being held without bail in the Weld County Jail.  The defendant faces a potential death penalty on the murder charges.  In a confession to police, Chris Watts alleged that he strangled Shanann Watts, 34, after seeing her do the same to their two daughters, Bella, 4, and Celeste, 3. Disbelieving investigators charged him with all three murders, as well as with the death of the couple’s unborn child.   >> Related story: Colorado father charged with killing pregnant wife, 2 daughters, says wife killed children Shanann Watts was 15 weeks pregnant with a son they planned to name Niko, friends and family have said. A Change.org petition started by friends demands that Colorado adopt a new law, named “Niko’s Law,” to make the killing of an unborn baby like the Watts’ son first-degree murder. As Chris Watts sat stone-faced throughout Tuesday’s proceedings, which were streamed live by CBS Denver, Judge Marcello Kopcow advised Watts of the updated charges levied against him. Watts had been in custody since Wednesday on suspicion of murder and tampering with evidence.  Chris Watts told 9News in Denver in an interview the day before his arrest that he had nothing to do with the deaths of his family.  “Everybody’s going to have their own opinion on anything like this,” Watts said in the TV interview. “I just want people to know that I want my family back. I want them safe and I want them here.” The charges Kopcow read in court state that Chris Watts caused the death of his wife on Aug. 13, the day she and her daughters were reported missing by a friend. The charges related to Bella and Celeste, however, state that he caused their deaths “between and including Aug. 12, 2018, and Aug. 13, 2018.” Shanann Watts was out of town until early Aug. 13.  An arrest affidavit released Monday states that the friend who reported Shanann and the girls missing, Nickole Utoft Atkinson, dropped Shanann off at the Watts’ home just before 2 a.m. that day. The two women had been on a business trip to Arizona for Le-Vel, a health and wellness company that sells nutritional products.  “Nicole (sic) stated Shanann was 15 weeks pregnant and was not feeling well during the trip,” the affidavit states.  Atkinson became concerned later that morning because Shanann Watts missed a 10 a.m. doctor’s appointment and was not answering phone calls or texts. She went to the couple’s home at 2825 Saratoga Trail to check on her.  Read the charges against Chris Watts below. “(Nickole) went to Shanann’s residence and discovered her car in the garage with car seats positioned inside of it,” the affidavit says. “(She) attempted to enter the front door, but a latch prevented it from opening more than three inches.” Atkinson called Chris Watts at work and asked him to return home to check on his wife, the court document reads. She was afraid that Shanann Watts, who reportedly had lupus, had passed out or was suffering some other medical emergency.  Atkinson also called police, who arrived before Chris Watts did. Once Chris Watts arrived and allowed officers into the house, they found Shanann Watts’ personal belongings -- her cellphone, purse, wallet and medication -- inside.  They also found a pair of women’s shoes kicked off by the front door and a suitcase, apparently from her Arizona trip, at the bottom of the stairs, the affidavit states.  Chris Watts initially told investigators that around 4 a.m. that day, he told his wife he wanted a separation. He said it was an emotional conversation, with both of them upset and crying, but that it was not argumentative.  Chris Watts told detectives that when he left for work just before 5:30 a.m., Shanann Watts told him she and the girls would be going to a friend’s home later in the day. He said that he backed his work truck up into the driveway to load some tools into it before leaving.  Read the warrantless arrrest affidavit in the Chris Watts case below. The truck’s movements were captured by a neighbor’s security camera, the affidavit says.  During the investigation into the disappearance of Shanann Watts and her daughters, investigators learned that Chris Watts was having an affair with a female co-worker at Anadarko Petroleum Corp. -- an affair that he denied in previous interviews.  Chris Watts was taken into custody Wednesday night, at which time Anadarko fired him. In a subsequent police interview Thursday, after being allowed to speak to his father, Chris Watts admitted strangling Shanann Watts the morning of Aug. 13, the affidavit states.  “Chris stated after he told Shanann he wanted a separation, he walked downstairs for a moment and then returned to his bedroom to speak with Shanann again,” the affidavit states. “While in the bedroom, via baby monitor located on Shanann’s nightstand, he observed Bella ‘sprawled’ out on her bed and blue and Shanann actively strangling Celeste. “Chris said he went into a rage and ultimately strangled Shanann to death.” Chris Watts told detectives that, when he backed his truck into the driveway, it was his wife and daughters’ bodies he loaded into the back seat, the affidavit states. He said he drove the bodies to an Anadarko work site just north of Roggan, an unincorporated area of Weld County about 40 miles from the family’s home in Frederick.  A Google Maps search using the coordinates of the site, which are included in the affidavit, shows a desolate area in which a dirt road leads to a couple of large oil tanks.  Chris Watts told investigators buried Shanann in a shallow grave near the tanks and dumped his daughters’ bodies inside the tanks.  “Chris was presented an aerial photograph of the tank battery area and identified three separate locations in which he placed the bodies,” the affidavit reads. Prior to Watts’ alleged confession, investigators did a drone search of the site and spotted a bedsheet in a field near the tank battery, the document says. The sheet matched the pattern of pillow cases and a top sheet discovered stuffed into a trash can in Watts’ kitchen earlier Thursday.  Shanann Watts’ body was found that afternoon, buried in a shallow grave near the oil tanks. Bella and Celeste were found inside the tanks, which were almost completely full of crude oil.  The girls’ bodies had been submerged in oil for four days, according to court documents filed by Chris Watts’ defense lawyer. The attorney, James Merson, sought to have defense experts at the autopsies of the victims, and to have DNA swabs done on the necks of the children, an apparent bid to prove that Shanann Watts killed her daughters.  Kopcow on Friday denied the motion to have defense experts present at the autopsies, but granted the request to for DNA swabs of Bella and Celeste’s necks. He denied the defense’s request that their expert take the swabs, however.  “Furthermore, defendant’s request to order prosecution to collect evidence in the manner described by defense expert is denied,” the order reads. “This court cannot order the prosecution and/or coroner how to conduct their investigation.” Kopcow said there was no indication that prosecutors or the coroner would destroy evidence, improperly collect it or fail to collect it.  The disappearance and killings of Shanann, Bella and Celeste Watts have captured national attention, and inspired gut-wrenching emotion from those who knew them. Shanann Watts’ father, Frank Rzucek, tearfully spoke publicly Monday ahead of the news conference at which Weld County District Attorney Michael Rourke announced the charges against Chris Watts.  “We would like to thank everyone in the Frederick Police Department and all the agencies involved for working so hard to find my daughter, granddaughters and Niko,” Rzucek said. “Thank you, everyone, for coming out to the candlelight vigil and saying all your prayers. They are greatly appreciated. “Keep the prayers coming for our family.” Rzucek has also been active on his Facebook page, posting photos of Bella and Celeste smiling and playing together. In one post, he uploaded the song “Let It Go” from the Disney movie “Frozen.” “Dear Bella and Celeste and Nico,” Rzucek wrote. “Pop Pop loves you. God bless you.” He also posted several photos of Shanann Watts.  “Dad loves you,” he wrote on one. On another, he wrote, “We got you, baby.” Family friends who let Chris Watts stay in their home after his wife and daughters went missing expressed shock over the accusations against him -- and apologized for taking him in and defending him against swirling rumors.  “Had we had any inclination that we thought he was involved at all, no way would I have let him in my house with my wife and kid,” Nick Thayer told 9News Thursday, the day Watts confessed and the bodies were found.  “They were family,” his wife, Amanda Thayer, told the news station. “They spent Thanksgivings with us and Fourth of Julys and all the holidays. It’s just unreal.” The couple, who also took in the Watts family’s dog, Deeter, until Shanann’s family could pick him up, is now left figuring out how to tell their 5-year-old daughter that her playmates are dead. They are also struggling to understand the crime themselves, 9News reported.  “I’m so sorry. We didn’t know. We thought we were doing the right thing,’ Nick Thayer said. “It’s all we can do is say we’re sorry that we defended him on social media. We really had no idea that he was capable of doing something like we’ve.... I hate it. I hate all of this.”
  • Court documents detail what a man charged with murder told investigators about the abduction and killing of Mollie Tibbetts. An affidavit filed Tuesday says the 20-year-old Tibbetts was running on July 18 in a rural area near Brooklyn, in central Iowa, when a car driven by Christian Bahena Rivera approached her. During questioning Monday, Rivera acknowledged making contact with Tibbetts, first by pursuing her in his car and then getting out and running beside her. Rivera told investigators he became angry when Tibbetts showed a cell phone and threatened to call police. He says he panicked and then “blocked” his memory. He says he does not recall what happened but found an earpiece from headphones in his lap and realized he’d put Tibbetts’ in his trunk. TRENDING STORIES: 7 scenic drives that will make you love Georgia even more Man accused of killing wife, daughters says he walked in on wife strangling children Girl, 15, says police officer sexually assaulted her for hours; GBI investigating He opened the trunk and noticed blood on the side of her head. The affidavit says he carried Tibbetts’ body to a cornfield and covered her with corn stalks. When he was questioned by authorities, he led investigators to the site. Rivera has been charged with first-degree murder.