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podcasts: The Clark Howard Podcast

Money expert Clark Howard shows you practical money-saving ideas to help you Save More, Spend Less, and Avoid Ripoffs. He helps you keep more of what you make and invest your money wisely.

Most Recent Episode:

11.13.18 Used cars are costing more; Mailbox crimes; 3D printing glasses

Topics: The average used car now costs more than $20k!; USPS mail preview is giving fraudsters a leg up on us; 3D printing glasses is the future of allowing customization.

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Posted: November 13, 2018

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More Episodes:

11.12.18 Google and Facebook end arbitration clauses; Paying at the pump; Tiny homes helping homeless vets

Topics: Google and Facebook are ending arbitration clauses for sexual harassment claims; How to protect yourself from more advanced skimmers that aim to steal your payment information. They are widely used at gas pumps now; Home sizes are shrinking. There are lots of benefits to that shift. Also, homeless vets are benefiting as tiny homes in certain locations are offering places for them to rest their head as they seek to get back on their feet.

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11.9.18 Clark Stinks; Veterans Day

Topics: Christa reads listener posts about how Clark has missed the mark in his advice this week. If you have a "Clark Stinks" to share you can leave it here; Clark talks about the importance of Veterans Day and discusses his own service

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11.8.18 Investing limits increasing; CVS receipts; Your customer service score

Topics: The limits for what you can contribute to a 401k, 457b, or an IRA are increasing in 2019; CVS receipts are SO incredibly long; Your customer service score could determine whether you get decent customer service from a retailer or not.

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11.7.18 Car recalls; Your Facebook info is for sale; Wireless mesh routers

Topics: Make sure to get recalls on your car fixed in a timely manner; Your Facebook info - including actual messages you have sent through the service - could be for sale online after the Facebook breach; Wireless mesh routers can help your home WiFi in a big way. And these systems are going down in price as well.

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11.6.18 International airfares to increase; Eliminating home internet with your cell phone plan

Topics: Some of the discount international airlines are in financial trouble. This could lead to increasing airfare prices when traveling overseas; Sprint has a cell phone plan that could help you eliminate the need for at-home internet. 

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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11.5.18 Open enrollment; Gift card scam; Amazon holiday free shipping

Topics: Open enrollment is upon us. Clark tells you how to tackle it in order to save the most and get the best coverage for your dollar; Gift card scams are proliferating. Watch out for a strange email from your boss...; Amazon is offering free shipping for all this Holiday season. Free shipping isn't just for Prime members anymore.

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11.2.18 Clark Stinks; Gas prices going down for the Holidays

Topics: Christa reads listener posts about how Clark has missed the mark in his advice this week. If you have a "Clark Stinks" to share you can leave it here; Gas prices are going down just in time for the Holidays. And the US is now #1 in getting oil out of the ground.

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11.1.18 Marriott strike; Android phone deal; Robots changing grocery delivery

Topics: Marriott employees are striking. And this is not good for Marriott customers; Clark mentions an awesome deal on a flagship Android phone that's only available for a few days for T-Mobile customers; Robots are changing the way groceries are delivered. And major grocery companies are diving headlong into this...and spending lots of money to make headway.

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10.31.18 Credit card issuers canceling cards; Kids and screen addiction

Topics: Discover, Capital One, and other credit card issuers are cancelling cards that haven't been used in a while. Clark talks about what this means for the broader economy and how you as an individual should handle your plastic; Screen addiction in youth is looking like a major problem. Wealthier and more educated communities are striving to ban screens for youth altogether - especially in schools. 

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News

  • Someone tossed a small dog into a trash can at a welcome center on a Georgia interstate, now officials are trying to find a new home for the terrified dog. The Hart County Animal Rescue said the Chihuahua or Chihuahua mix was found at the Interstate 85 welcome center, WYFF reported. “She was freezing, wet, hungry and scared when someone found her in the trash can this morning,” officials at the shelter posted to Facebook.  >> Read more trending news  Officials are not sure if the dog, whom they are calling Caroline, was stolen from a family or was dumped by someone who didn’t want her anymore, WYFF reported. Officials at the shelter say that Caroline will be up for adoption after they get her medical report from the veterinarian and the mandatory stray hold of 7 days has finished.  If interested in giving Caroline a furever home, you can fill out an application at www.hartcountyanimalrescue.org.
  • Lawyers suing President Donald Trump over his decision to end special protections shielding certain immigrants from deportation are seeking unaired footage from his reality TV show 'The Apprentice' to try to bolster their case alleging the move was racially motivated, the attorneys said Wednesday. Lawyers for Civil Rights, which sued Trump in February, has issued subpoenas to MGM Holdings Inc. and Trump Productions LLC demanding any footage shot during the production of the show in which Trump 'uses racial and/or ethnic slurs' or 'makes remarks concerning race, nationality and/or ethnic background.' Former White House staffer and fellow reality-TV star Omarosa Manigault Newman claimed without evidence in a book released in August, 'Unhinged,' that a tape exists of the president using the N-word on the reality show's set. Trump has denied the existence of such tapes, tweeting that the show's producer told him 'there are NO TAPES of the Apprentice where I used such a terrible and disgusting word as attributed by Wacky and Deranged Omarosa.' 'I don't have that word in my vocabulary, and never have,' Trump said. The case filed in Boston's federal court centers on the Trump administration's decision to end temporary protected status for thousands of immigrants from Haiti, El Salvador and Honduras. Temporary protected status provides safe havens for people from countries experiencing armed conflicts, natural disasters and other challenges. Lawyers for Civil Rights says in the lawsuit that Trump's move to rescind the program was rooted in animus against immigrants of color, citing comments he made on the campaign trial and in office. 'Access to these videotapes will help further demonstrate that Defendant Trump holds racially biased views that impact his policy and decision making,' attorney Oren Nimni said. The subpoenas also seek any relevant outtakes, audio clips and transcripts made during production of the show. An MGM lawyer and White House officials didn't immediately respond to an email requesting comment. A federal judge in July denied Trump's request to throw out the lawsuit and rejected the administration's bid to remove Trump as a defendant in the case. In a different case in California, another federal judge last month issued a temporary injunction that bars the Trump administration from ending the protections, saying there is evidence that president 'harbors an animus against non-white, non-European aliens which influenced his ... decision to end the TPS designation The Trump administration is appealing that ruling. Pressure on producers of the 'The Apprentice' to release unaired footage of the show intensified during the 2016 presidential campaign after The Washington Post published a 2005 'Access Hollywood' recording of Trump boasting about aggressively groping women. MGM, which owns 'The Apprentice,' said at the time that it couldn't unilaterally release any unaired, archived material because of contractual obligations. The show's producer, Mark Burnett, also said he didn't have the ability or right to release footage. A former contestant on 'The Apprentice' who has accused Trump of unwanted groping and kissing has also sought footage through a lawsuit against the president, but it's unclear whether she has received any. The subpoena issued by Summer Zervos' attorney in May sought any 'Apprentice' material that features Zervos, or Trump talking about her or discussing other female contestants in a sexual or inappropriate way. ____ Follow Alanna Durkin Richer on Twitter at http://twitter.com/aedurkinricher.
  • A homeless man was caught on surveillance camera sneaking into a Florida restaurant, exiting a bathroom naked, sitting at a picnic table eating ramen noodles and then playing the bongos, WFLA reported.  >> Read more trending news  It turns out the man plays guitar at the St. Petersburg restaurant and was just using the facilities after hours, the television station reported. Still, it was a strange circumstance that began when a St. Petersburg officer was investigating a break-in that occurred at The Chattaway restaurant on Nov. 6. The officer was reviewing surveillance video that showed a burglar eating a plate of chicken wings and beer and stealing more than $500 of tips and equipment, the Tampa Bay Times reported. When the officer rewound the surveillance camera to Nov. 5, he found video of a man biking to the restaurant, entering a shed and removing items. The man then went into a bathroom, came out naked and sat down at a picnic table and ate a meal he brought with him -- Maruchan Instant Lunch ramen, the newspaper reported. The man then played the bongos -- while still naked -- and then rode off on a bicycle, the Times reported. “He came in with pants on but he rode off on the bike without pants,” Chattaway server Chad Pearson told the newspaper. “I’m not sure if he took his pants with him but we didn't find them. We still don't know where his pants are.” The owners of the restaurant do know who the naked diner is -- Robert Brown, who plays guitar at The Chattaway. “He's a great musician. And you know, I think he needs that chance” Chattaway co-owner Winona Kitto told WFLA. >> Naked peeping tom caught dabbing on security camera “It's kind of a little embarrassing what happened,” Brown told the television station. “Winona said that I could use the restroom, park my car here and I did have some equipment in the back room there.  “I knew I had access to the restroom. So I went in and I cleaned myself up,” Brown told WFLA. “Washed my clothes. And apparently that's when I was naked.” After eating his meal and the musical interlude, Brown straightened out the storage shed, returning the items he took out. He also left a supply of ramen noodles, the television station reported. Police are still searching for the thief who broke into the restaurant Nov. 6. As for Brown, who lives out of his broken-down car, Chattaway co-owner Amanda Kitto said no charges would be filed, the Times reported.  “His goal was to not break in, his goal was to just hang out at The Chattaway,' she told the newspaper. Brown has gotten plenty of attention for his antics. “I'm OK with it. I just hope he's OK with it,” Winona Kitto told WFLA. “I mean, not everybody wants to show their fabulous tush, you know?”  “I'm looking for work,” Brown told the television station. “I want to work.”
  • A state-funded academy to train Amazon’s employees. An exclusive lounge - with free parking - at the world’s busiest airport. An Amazon-dedicated car on MARTA. And more than $2 billion worth of publicly-funded incentives. That was a glimpse of the package of incentives Georgia offered to Amazon to try to lure the Seattle-based giant’s second headquarters, what was supposed to be a $5 billion campus with as many as 50,000 jobs. Though Atlanta made a short-list of finalists, it wasn’t meant to be. The company split the project into two smaller sites, one that went to northern Virginia and the other to New York. Georgia also missed out on the biggest consolation prize – a 5,000 job operations center that went to Nashville.  For more than a year, the incentives dangled by Georgia recruiters were a closely-guarded state secret thanks to a state law that shielded them from the public. But that changed late Tuesday when the state disclosed its full package for the first time. Here’s what we learned:  INCENTIVES The total incentive package would have topped $2 billion. It would have included $1.3 billion in “mega project tax credits,” a $320 million sales tax break for construction materials, and a $100 million direct investment in the headquarters site.  One of the components would have been an on-site “Amazon Georgia Academy” operated with the help of the University System of Georgia and the state tech college system. The price tag was listed as “incalculable/TBD” by state officials.  It would have offered a 24-week boot camp program for staffers, undergraduate and post-graduate coursework, and state-sponsored recruiters to help fill the company’s jobs. The state would pay to build the academy and pick up the first five years of operating costs – including salaries of professors and recruiters.  At least $87 million in additional local tax credits were on the table from the city of Atlanta, including a $25 million grant from the city’s economic development arm. The city touted another $2.2 billion in infrastructure investments – such as parks, watershed and Beltline paths – near possible sites. To entice Amazon to move to the sprawling Gulch overhaul in downtown Atlanta, the project’s developer – CIM Group – also committed to transferring to Amazon about $8 million in credits from the Westside Tax Allocation District.  OTHER PERKS This is where it gets more interesting. The state proposed an exclusive lounge at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport for Amazon executives, along with 50 free parking spots. And the firm developing a nearby hotel offered a plot of land for an “Amazon Experience Center” near the sprawling airport.  To allay concerns about Atlanta’s gridlock, the state said MARTA would consider adding an Amazon-dedicated car “to distribute products around the city.” And Amazon was promised opportunities to rename city streets around its new campus – “Alexa Way” and “Prime Place” were among the examples.  AMAZON LOVE The state tried to butter up Amazon with a long list of the company’s connections in Georgia that included investments it made in metro Atlanta firms. “Simply put,” the section read, “Atlanta has a long history of Amazon love.”  SITES The initial slate of potential sites included many familiar places – and some others not previously known to be aggressively pitched. The Lockheed/Dobbins region in Cobb County was one, the Infinite Energy Center in Gwinnett another.  A lengthier list included more than 60 sites, including some in exurban and rural areas.  A second, more detailed proposal submitted earlier this year narrowed in on four areas: Downtown, Midtown, the Old Fourth Ward and the Quarry Yards on the Westside. Each had detailed renderings of proposed construction and ambitious new amenities. The Midtown site plan, for instance, suggested a new park spanning across the Downtown Connector around Woodruff Arts Center or jutting out near Georgia Tech to connect the company’s sprawling complex of towers.  The Westside renderings had a string of low-lying office buildings in a lush, verdant campus near Bellwood Quarry, while the downtown version focused in part on a cluster of aging buildings south of Broad Street. The pitch: “Revitalizing Atlanta’s first building blocks.”  The vision for Old 4th Ward, meanwhile, involved a series of glass-covered towers built in the shadow of Ponce City Market or other nearby stretches that hug the Beltline.  THE VISIT The documents outline for the first time the itinerary of the Amazon delegation’s ill-fated visit to Georgia, which came as lawmakers debated a contentious adoption measure and scuttled a tax break for the state’s largest private employer. This article was written by Greg Bluestein, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
  • A congressional advisory panel says the purchase of internet-linked devices manufactured in China leaves the United States vulnerable to security breaches that could put critical infrastructure at risk. In its annual report on Wednesday, the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission warns of dangers to the U.S. government and private sector from a reliance on global supply chains linked to China, which is the world's largest manufacturer of information technology equipment. China's push to dominate in the high-tech industry by 2025 already is a sore point with Washington and a contributing factor in trade tensions that have seen the world's two largest economies slap billions of dollars in punitive tariffs on each other's products this year. The U.S. also has had long-running concerns about state-backed cyber theft of corporate secrets, something that China agreed to stop in 2015. But the bipartisan commission highlights the potential security risks to the United States by China's pre-eminence in the so-called internet of things, or IoT, which refers to the proliferation of physical devices that have sensors that collect and share data and connect to the internet. Such devices could be everything from household appliances like refrigerators and air conditioners to warehouse delivery systems, smart traffic signs and aerial drones. 'The scale of Chinese state support for the IoT, the close supply chain integration between the United States and China, and China's role as an economic and military competitor to the United States creates enormous economic, security, supply chain, and data privacy risks for the United States,' the report says. The commission, which does not set policy but can make recommendations to Congress and the U.S. administration, is warning that the potential impact of malicious cyberattacks through such systems will intensify with the adoption of ultra-fast 5G networks that could quicken data speeds by up to 100 times. 'The lax security protections and universal connectivity of IoT devices creates numerous points of vulnerability that hackers or malicious state actors can exploit to hold U.S. critical infrastructure, businesses, and individuals at risk,' the report says. The United States has already taken some steps to restrict the use of Chinese-made high technology. For example, it has restricted government procurement from Chinese tech giants Huawei and ZTE, which deny their products are used for spying by China's authoritarian government. In June, the Defense Department suspended the purchase of all commercial, off-the-shelf drones until a cybersecurity risk assessment strategy was established. In 2017, U.S. customs authorities alleged that drones produced by Chinese company DJI, which has dominated the U.S. and Canadian drone markets, likely provided China with access to U.S. critical infrastructure and law enforcement data. DJI denied the allegation. The commission is calling for Congress to push for assessments by U.S. government agencies on their supply chain vulnerabilities. It says the U.S. government depends on commercial, off-the-shelf products, many of them made in China, for more than 95 percent of its electronics components and information technology systems. Large U.S. telecommunications providers also rely on global supply chains dominated by Chinese manufacturers. Although they do not source directly from Huawei and ZTE, major U.S. telecommunications providers rely on other foreign 5G network equipment suppliers that incorporate Chinese manufacturing in their supply chains, the report says.
  • Old equipment and old laws are adding to the problems with Florida’s vote recount, even after the 2000 recount that delayed the outcome of the presidential election for more than a month. >> Watch the news report here It's been almost two decades since the last recount finally ended with the U.S. Supreme Court stepping in, ultimately handing Florida’s electoral votes – and the election – to George W. Bush. The embarrassment of those days ended with the state taking a hard look at voting. Then-Gov. Jeb Bush fought for state and federal dollars to modernize the system. >> On WFTV.com: Florida recount: Click here for live updates from across the state After this week, it may be time to fight again. 'The county needs funding, but we also need the state and feds to be partners in it,' said Orange County Supervisor of Elections Bill Cowles. >> Read more trending news  Cowles got $700,000 from the county late last year to buy better sorting machines for ballots, but not all of Florida's 67 counties have the same resources. Palm Beach County, for example, uses equipment that's almost two decades old. Palm Beach County said Tuesday it may not be able to meet the Thursday deadline to complete the machine recounts. Which brings us to the other antiquated part of Florida voting: the timeline. The timeline for the primary, general election, and reporting of votes is set by the legislature and has been largely unchanged for decades, even as Florida has grown to be the third-largest state in the country. 'The timeline we are on has been in for so long and it doesn't reflect the way we are voting today,' Cowles said. >> On WFTV.com: Here's a running list of the lawsuits filed in the Florida midterm election Cowles said Orange County will make the deadline this week, but warns between the quick timeline and old equipment in other larger counties, some may not. Earlier this year, Florida received $19.2 million in federal election security money. However, that money was mainly designed to fortify voting systems against cyberthreats, not buy new equipment. Debates over the timeline for voting and vote counts will need to be addressed by the legislature.