On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

clear-day
91°
Partly Cloudy
H 91° L 71°
  • clear-day
    91°
    Current Conditions
    Partly Cloudy. H 91° L 71°
  • cloudy-day
    91°
    Today
    Partly Cloudy. H 91° L 71°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    84°
    Tomorrow
    T-storms. H 84° L 70°
Listen
Pause
Error

News on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

Traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

Weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

podcasts: The Clark Howard Podcast

Save more and spend less is more than just a motto for money expert Clark Howard; it’s a way of life. Clark and his crew — Team Clark — are on a mission to empower people to take control of their personal finances by providing money-saving tips, consumer advice, hot deals and economic news to help everyone achieve financial freedom. Clark is a nationally syndicated radio talk show host and a consumer reporter for television stations around the country. His podcast, The Clark Howard Show, receives more than one million downloads each month and is a hub for listeners to get valuable advice on-demand any time. Clark answers questions on the most popular business and consumer topics including; how to buy a cars, financing a home, retirement planning, shopping for insurance and getting the most out of your savings. Join the conversation and submit your question to www.clark.com/askclark . Clark spearheads two free resources — Clark.com and ClarkDeals.com — to encourage consumers to save more, spend less and avoid ripoffs.

Most Recent Episode:

7.3.20 Community college saves you money; Clark Stinks

Topics: Community college is a big time money saver. And it might make even more sense for lots of kids in the Fall. Kim and Joel share the Clark Stinks posted on the web and share with Clark. Submit yours to: Clark.com/ClarkStinks. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Posted: July 03, 2020

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

Audio temporarily unavailable
refreshretry

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

Audio temporarily unavailable
refreshretry
 

More Episodes:

7.2.20 Millions of loan payments being skipped; How to approach investing if you are near retirement

Topics: Millions of loan payments aren't being made right now. But it's actually not as bad as some people thought it might be. Many near-retirees are having a hard time thinking about how they should handle their investments right now. Clark gives his thoughts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

Audio temporarily unavailable
refreshretry

7.1.20 Travel insurance problems; People are moving all across the country

Topics: The travel insurance industry has had massive problems during the pandemic. Clark tells you how to buy travel insurance moving forward. People are moving across the country in much greater numbers right now for more opportunities or a better life. Remote work is definitely contributing to this as well. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

Audio temporarily unavailable
refreshretry

6.30.20 Keep your food fresh longer; Is now a good time to re-balance your retirement portfolio?

Topics: There are ways to keep your food fresh for longer. And it's more important as grocery prices continue to rise. Re-balancing your portfolio can be important from time to time. And right after stocks have moved a good bit might mean it's wise to check your holding. But remember, it's important to keep your time horizon in mind before you make any changes too. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

Audio temporarily unavailable
refreshretry

6.29.20 New 401k rules could wreak havoc on your account; Asking for a raise

Topics: New 401k rules allow for individual investors to invest in private equity. Clark is not a fan of this. Clark gives suggestions on how to ask for a raise...and actually get one. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

Audio temporarily unavailable
refreshretry

6.26.20 Americans are returning to car dealerships; Clark Stinks

Topics: Most people thought that car buying would take place online in the future - in large part as a response to the pandemic. But Americans are already returning to car dealerships! Kim and Joel share the Clark Stinks posted on the web and share with Clark. Submit yours to: Clark.com/ClarkStinks. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

Audio temporarily unavailable
refreshretry

6.25.20 Walmart expands education benefit to include skilled trades; Vanguard's super-cheap digital advisor

Topics: Walmart is offering its workers increased access to education benefits that go beyond just getting a college degree. Vanguard's digital advisor service is making robo-advising even cheaper and more accessible for people. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

Audio temporarily unavailable
refreshretry

6.24.20 Banks took in $11 billion in overdraft fees in 2019; Pay cuts are becoming more common

Topics: Overdraft fees are the worst. Mostly because they can be avoided! Pay cuts have become more common during the pandemic. Many employers are choosing pay reductions instead of letting employees go completely. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

Audio temporarily unavailable
refreshretry

6.23.20 Watch out for unused gift cards; Debt collectors increase aggressive tactics

Topics: Unused gift cards need to be used as soon as possible. As more retailers file for bankruptcy those gift cards become worthless. Debt collectors are taking more aggressive tactics to claw back money from people that owe. Clark tells you what to watch out for. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

Audio temporarily unavailable
refreshretry

6.22.20 Beware credit card fraud; Renter background checks are flawed

Topics: As we do more shopping online, scammers are more likely to take over individual credit card accounts. So freeze your credit and check your statements and watch out for phishing scams. Renter background checks help landlords decide who they will rent to. But they aren't always accurate. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

00:00:00 / 00:00:00

Audio temporarily unavailable
refreshretry

News

  • Two people are dead and at least eight others are injured following an overnight shooting in a South Carolina nightclub. Deputies in Greenville, South Carolina, are investigating the incident which occurred just before 2 a.m. Sunday at the Lavish Lounge, where an estimated 100 patrons were inside when the shooting began, WSPA reported. All 10 victims were found inside the club and transported to local hospital by emergency medical responders. Two of the 10 victims died at the hospital, the Greenville County coroner told the TV station, identifying the deceased as Clarence Sterling Johnson, 51, and Mykala Bell, 23. Greenville County Sheriff Hobart Lewis confirmed Johnson was a security guard at the nightclub. Only two of the wounded victims remained hospitalized by 2 p.m. Sunday, Prisma Health spokesperson Sandy Dees told WSPA. According to NBC News, Hobart said his deputies have suspect information but did not identify a person of interest and no arrests have been made. Citing confusion in the immediate aftermath of the shooting for the miscount, Lt. Jimmy Bolt with the Greenville County Sheriff’s office told the network authorities initially said 12 people were shot but later reduced the count to 10.
  • Two people were struck by lighting Sunday afternoon on a Florida beach, officials said. One person was taken to a hospital and is in critical condition, Clearwater police said. The other person was treated at the scene and is in stable condition. “If you are close enough to a storm to hear thunder, please seek shelter and head indoors,” officials said on social media. 
  • A rare 'brain-eating amoeba' was diagnosed in a person in Florida, county health officials said. A confirmed case of Naegleria fowleri, a microscopic amoeba found in warm freshwater environments that infects the brain and is usually fatal, was announced Friday by the Florida Department of Health. Health officials did not disclose the person's identity or the body of water where the person might have been infected, The Tampa Bay Times reported. The amoeba can lead to primary amebic meningoencephalitis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A person can be infected through contaminated water entering their nose. The amoeba is more prevalent during the summer months when water levels are lower and temperatures are higher. Symptoms include fever, nausea and headaches. There have been 37 reported cases of the amoeba in Florida since 1962.
  • After months of hiding from COVID-19, many Atlantans emerged from their homes last month with rage rather than apprehension about the uncertain world. With the recent death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police, they felt safe enough to take to streets and demand police reform that would stop brutality against Black people. Protesters marched and chanted loudly, so alive as they called for less senseless death. Atlanta Police stood stone-faced as protesters screamed, and many were outraged when fellow officers were fired and then charged with assaulting arrestees and, in the case of one cop, murder. Beneath it all, a grim phenomenon was taking shape: Shootings among residents were rising in the city — homicides, too. Ninety-three people were shot in Atlanta during the four-week period of May 31 to June 27, up drastically from 46 in the same period last year. And fourteen people died of homicide in that span, compared to six during the same time frame in 2019. Those shot have included a 10-year-old boy who survived, an 18-year-old who may have been selling water on the street in Midtown when he was killed, and an 80-year-old man who died as the unintended target of a drive-by in his home. The numbers are still climbing. On Saturday, an 8-year-old girl was shot dead near the burned out Wendy’s where Rayshard Brooks was killed by an Atlanta cop. Atlanta police said it appears a group of armed people stopped the car in which the child was riding before someone shot into it. A few hours later, 14 were shot during a fight at an outdoor party in northeast Atlanta where people had gathered to watch fireworks, police said. That shooting occurred about the same time a crowd was busting out windows of the Georgia State Patrol headquarters. The spate of violence may be happenstance, but observers say it’s a safe bet multiple factors are at play: pent up energy and angst from quarantine; folks trying to handle disputes themselves rather than call police whom they distrust; and Atlanta officers working less proactively because of what they see as anti-police sentiment on the streets and a lack of support from local politicians. “There seems to be withdrawal by police,” said Russell Covey, Georgia State University criminal law professor. “The lack of a police presence may create something of a vacuum of authority.” Atlanta police are indeed withdrawing, said Atlanta police officer Jason Segura, president of the International Brotherhood of Police Officers’ local chapter. The violence spike can likely be attributed to officers taking a less proactive approach to preventing crime, he said. “Officers are afraid to do their job,” Segura said. The Atlanta Police Department didn’t respond to a request for comment. Lately, Segura said, every officer he talks with is angry about the treatment of the nine Atlanta officers who were charged by Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard in June. Segura said he and other cops believe Garrett Rolfe, since fired, and Officer Devin Brosnan followed the Atlanta Police Department’s use of force policy in their encounter with Brooks. Rolfe, charged with felony murder and 10 other offenses, was granted a $500,000 bond and must wear an ankle monitor, have no contact with witnesses, abide by a 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew, and not possess any firearms. He also was ordered to surrender his passport. Brosnan, charged with aggravated assault for standing on Brooks with his boot, and three violations of his oath of office, was released on a $50,000 signature bond. The arrests were galling — and confounding — to other officers, who feel they don’t have clarity on what city leaders want from them, Segura said. After Brooks’ death, Police Chief Erika Shields stepped aside while Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and city council members began talking about “re-imagining” the police department and changing use of force policies. Segura said officers will abide by whatever policy the city writes for them. Bottoms addressed the increased violence during a conference call with the city council Thursday. She pointed out that overall crime is down 30 percent, while acknowledging the spike in shootings. “But certainly we are in a very challenging period right now,” the mayor said, adding that a task force is working as quickly as possible to review the use of force policy. The mayor has so far issued three administrative orders based on the task force’s recommendations. The orders seek to ensure officers’ body cameras are filming during use of force incidents; that witnesses who have their own footage can share it easily with investigators; and that the Atlanta Citizen Review Board is empowered to drive change in policing in the city. Atlanta City Council is set to vote on other policing reform measures Monday, including a proposed ban on the use of choke holds. Bottoms noted that other large cities have seen similar increases in violence recently because of “the state of the country right now.” It isn’t clear how many cities have seen such a spike, but at least two have. “Gun violence soars amid crises of health, public trust, officer reluctance,” read a recent headline in Minneapolis’ Star Tribune. “Gun Violence Spikes in N.Y.C., Intensifying Debate Over Policing,” read one in the New York Times. In Atlanta’s Edgewood neighborhood, resident Quincy Jackson, 34, said he’s been hearing more gunshots lately and is hopeful Atlanta officers and officials can find common ground soon. He’s torn — he sees the merits of the Black Lives Matter protests, but he also knows the community needs police. “I think they have slacked off some,” Jackson said Thursday on Edgewood Avenue, across the street from a mural of George Floyd. “Now it seems like the cops are scared to do anything, like they don’t want to get in trouble.” Down the street, Alethea Carter, who’s lived in the neighborhood all of her 65 years, doesn’t have many warm feelings for the Atlanta Police Department right now. As a Black mother, she said she was heartbroken by the death of Brooks. Now she’s even more upset with the police because, after those events that brought so much pain to so many people, the police seem to be even less invested in doing right by the community. She’s saddened by the rise in shootings on the streets too. “If they don’t kill us,” she said, “we’re going to kill one another. It’s sad.” In DeKalb County, where county cops and political leaders aren’t in the midst of such consternation, homicides were down by five in the same period where Atlanta saw killings increase by eight. Statistics on overall shootings there weren’t immediately available. DeKalb County officers police a population whose size is close to Atlanta’s. In Atlanta, as officials, residents and police work to find middle ground, victims of violent crime and their loved ones are left to wonder if their plights could’ve been prevented. When 80-year-old Clarence Knox was shot in the June 25 drive-by, Atlanta police had known for weeks his home was being targeted. Back on June 3, he’d apparently been laying on the couch, where he often lounged while sipping Miller Genuine Draft and watching old Westerns, when bullets tore into the house. He called his daughter, Rochelle Thibodeaux, and said: “Baby girl, if I would’ve been sitting up on the couch you wouldn’t be talking to me right now.” Knox also called 911 to report the shooting. The attackers, the family believes, were trying to hurt a young relative who Knox let stay in the home. The family told police that, as well as who might be after the young man, Thibodeaux said. Thibodeaux tried to convince her father to come stay with her, but he didn’t want to be run out of his own home. On June 26, the family hadn’t been able to reach Knox for a while, so they summoned police. Officers found him shot dead on the floor, clutching the phone as if he was trying to call 911, his daughter said. Officers reported finding as many as 20 shell casing outside. Now, as Thibodeaux aches with grief, she wonders if police could’ve saved him. “I feel like it could’ve been prevented if they put more police cars in that area after the first shooting. They never even followed up,” she said, frustration clear in her voice. “I know we have a lot of things going on, but this is our 80-year-old father.”
  • Hundreds of scientists from more than 30 countries have evidence that shows the coronavirus can infect people through the air and are asking the World Health Organization to update its recommendations.  Researchers, including 239 scientists from 32 countries, plan to publish an open letter to the health organization in a scientific journal next week, The New York Times reported.  The health organization is unconvinced. “Especially in the last couple of months, we have been stating several times that we consider airborne transmission as possible but certainly not supported by solid or even clear evidence,” Dr. Benedetta Allegranzi, the health agency’s technical lead on infection control told The New York Times. “There is a strong debate on this.” The agency said in its latest update June 29 that airborne transmission is possible, but only after medical procedures.  The health agency has said that the virus spreads from person to person through small droplets released when people cough, sneeze or speak. 
  • Gunfire and violence that broke out across Atlanta over the July Fourth holiday weekend left more than 20 people injured and killed three people, including an 8-year-old girl, police said.  The first of the incidents, which involved the child, seems to have happened in the area of University Avenue and Pryor Road shortly before 10 p.m. Saturday, police spokesman Sgt. John Chafee said in a statement.  The girl was riding in a car with her mother and an adult friend on I-75/85 when they exited onto University Avenue, Chafee said. The driver tried to turn into a parking lot in the 1200 block of Pryor Road but was confronted by a “group of armed individuals who had blocked the entrance,” Chafee said.  “At some point, someone in that group opened fire on the vehicle, striking it multiple times and striking the child who was inside,” he said.  RELATED: 8-year-old girl shot, killed in Atlanta The driver took the child to Atlanta Medical Center, Chafee said. She did not survive her injuries, he said.  In another incident, as many as 14 people were injured when shots were fired on Auburn Avenue, Chafee said. Police were sent to the area bout 1 a.m., he said.  Investigators said a “large group” of people were gathered in the intersection to watch fireworks at a party.  At some point, a car hit a group of the partygoers,  Chafee said. The incident sparked a fight and led to gunshots.  All of the victims were taken to hospitals by private cars, and 12 of them are stable, Chafee said. Two of them were reported in critical condition and then died Sunday, he said.  About 11:30 p.m. Saturday, police were  called to the 1500 block of Hardee Street after two people were reportedly shot, according to Chafee.  Investigators said the man and woman had confronted a group of people who had been setting off fireworks outside their home. At some point during the conflict, shots were fired and the victims were hit, Chafee said.  The man and woman were taken to Grady Memorial Hospital, Chafee said.  “Both declined to provide information to police regarding what happened,”He said.  About the same time, five people were hurt in a drive-by shooting at a location on Lakewood Avenue, Chafee said.  All five victims were taken an area hospitals, he said. They were listed as stable.  Two people were also reported injured in unrelated shootings on Etheridge Drive and Edgewood Street.   City Council President Felicia Moore said she was up until 4 a.m. Sunday talking to constituents alarmed by the spasm of violence overnight. “This type of behavior is unacceptable and cannot be tolerated,” Moore said. “A strong message needs to be sent, and so I’m saying it, and I certainly hope we will hear from the chief and the mayor in the same vein, that this is unacceptable and cannot continue.” Moore said she contacted Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and Interim police Chief Rodney Bryant when she learned of the little girl’s shooting death. The scene of the incident occurred across the street from the Wendy’s where Rayshard Brooks was shot in June by police in an incident that sparked protests across the area. RELATED: Drive-by shooting reported outside Wendy’s where Rayshard Brooks was killed MORE: OPINION: If you visit the torched Wendy’s, you’ll get guns with that Moore said Bryant sent a text message assuring her the police will get the matter under control. She said constituents have told her they want to hear a plan to address the spike in violent crime that has occurred in the city in recent weeks. “Another of night of this cannot happen,” Moore said. Investigators are still working to determine the circumstances of the shootings. No arrests have been made in any of the cases.  Staff writer Scott Trubey contributed to this report. In other news: