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podcasts: Breakdown

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution's Breakdown podcast returns with hosts Bill Rankin and Christian Boone. In our seventh season, we examine the deadly police shooting of Afghanistan war veteran Anthony Hill. Hill was not only unarmed when he was gunned down in March 2015, he was naked. The 26-year-old was struggling with bipolar disorder and was off his medication. But Police Officer Chip Olsen didn’t know that when he responded to a 911 call about a nude man wandering around a metro Atlanta apartment complex in the middle of the afternoon. The AJC's Breakdown podcast is just that — the breakdown of the story and the systems. The largest newsroom in the southeast delivers investigations and true crime cases that you cannot find anywhere else.

Most Recent Episode:

S08, Ep2: Preliminary Hearing

Topics: Protests in Atlanta attract national attention as a preliminary hearing in Brunswick begins. During the probable cause hearing, there is only one witness: the lead investigator on the case. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Posted: June 11, 2020

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More Episodes:

S08, Ep1: The Ahmaud Arbery case

Topics: A tragic shooting has thrust coastal Georgia onto the national scene. On Feb. 23, Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old African-American man, was shot three times in a neighborhood near Brunswick, where he was confronted by two white men. The video of the shooting has now been seen by millions. In this special episode of Breakdown, hosts Bill Rankin and Greg Bluestein examine what is known about the case, and what’s to come. You’ll hear from officials down in Brunswick as well as former AJC managing editor, Bert Roughton, who lives in nearby St. Simons and has covered the case, as well as Brad Schrade, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter who has investigated police shootings for the AJC and has also covered the Arbery shooting. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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Bonus: The Imperfect Alibi

Topics: In this special episode of Breakdown, AJC reporter Joshua Sharpe decided to take a close look at a 35-year-old double murder case. An African-American couple was shot and killed inside Rising Daughter Baptist Church in Camden County, Ga. Dennis Perry was convicted of the killings and has been in prison for 20 years for them. What Sharpe found out is stunning. And we’re going to let him tell you about it, from beginning to end. In this episode, he reads his story, “The Imperfect Alibi: the forgotten suspect, the DNA and the church murders that haunted a detective.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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S07, Ep9: The verdict

Topics: Chip Olsen's fate is now in the hands of the jury. Will the ex-cop end up behind bars? We take you through the murder trial's dramatic conclusion and its aftermath. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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S07, Ep8: The State Strikes Back

Topics: After a rocky start, prosecutors come out swinging in the murder trial of Chip Olsen. One of their star witnesses: Olsen's own police academy instructor. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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S07, Ep7: Three eyewitnesses

Topics: Testimony begins in the murder trial of Robert "Chip" Olsen and a trio of witnesses who saw Anthony Hill's final moments take the stand for the state. But do they help or hurt the prosecution's case? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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S07, Ep6: Unarmed. Unclothed. Unable to Harm?

Topics: A jury is seated and Chip Olsen's murder trial is finally underway. The ex-cop's defense lawyer said he fired at Anthony Hill because he was terrified as the naked man ran at him. But the prosecution offers a surprising new theory. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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S07, Ep5: A trial run

Topics: Chip Olsen's legal team turns to a mock jury to road test their defense strategy. Jurors had a lot of questions and some strong opinions. And what will the lawyers be looking for when they select a real jury? This murder case could turn conventional wisdom on its head. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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S07, Ep4: Policing a mental health crisis

Topics: When Anthony Hill was killed by DeKalb County Police Officer Robert “Chip” Olsen in 2015 he became the latest casualty in a growing crisis: One in every four people shot and killed by police is suffering from mental illness. Why do police encounters with the mentally ill turn deadly so often? And would Hill be alive today if DeKalb had done more to train its officers? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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S07, Ep3: 'Impervious to pain, superhuman strength'

Topics: Former Police Officer Chip Olsen takes the stand in a risky gamble to try to get the murder charges against him dismissed. Does it pay off? And his lawyers push a controversial defense used by cops to justify the use of force. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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S07, Ep2: The road to indictment

Topics: Who is Chip Olsen? The cop who shot and killed Anthony Hill followed an unusual path to the force. We’ll tell you why it’s so rare to indict police officers who kill in the line of duty. And we’ll take you inside the surprising revelation that convinced the DeKalb DA to not only charge Olsen, but to charge him with murder. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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News

  • You may be seeing social media posts promoting #BlackOutDay2020, but what is Black Out Day? Here are five things to know. 1. Blackout Day is persuading Black Americans to not spend money today, to show their economic power. If something needs to be purchased, the movement urges spending money at Black-owned businesses, CNN reported. It’s called a “day of solidarity in America where not one Black person in America spends a dollar,” unless it is spent at a Black-owned business, USA Today reported. Nielsen reports that Black Americans spent more than $1 trillion in 2018, according to CNN. 2. The day was promoted by Calvin Martyr, a social media personality/activist, for about two months. 3. Martyr and those taking part are hoping the day helps to end institutional racism that they have said lead to the deaths of Black Americans, CNN reported. It started after the death of Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor, but before the death of George Floyd. 4. Martyr likened to the spending boycott to the 1955 Montgomery bus boycott when the Black community refused to ride buses until they were allowed to sit wherever they wanted. 5. My Black Receipt is a related movement that urges for people to upload receipts of money spent at minority-owned businesses, USA Today reported.
  • The U.S. Small Business Administration and the Treasury Department on Monday released loan-level data on each of the more than 4.9 million loans made under the government’s Paycheck Protection Program. The program was established in March by the CARES Act, aimed at shoring up small businesses struggling amid the coronavirus pandemic. Authorities said the funds were meant to give business owners incentive to keep their employees on payrolls. Data released Monday includes the names of more than 660,000 businesses that received loans of $150,000 or more. A majority of the program’s beneficiaries -- about 80% -- asked for loans under that amount, with most seeking about $100,000, according to officials. >> See the full data released by SBA and the Treasury Department In a statement, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said that the program has helped to support 'more than 51 million jobs and over 80 percent of all small business employees.' Under the program, the government is backing $659 billion in low-interest business loans that will be forgiven if employers use the money on payroll, rent and similar expenses. Companies typically must have fewer than 500 workers to qualify. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Atlanta’s fire chief has opted to self-quarantine pending the results of a COVID-19 test, one day after the city’s mayor announced that she tested positive for the virus.  Randall Slaughter is being tested for the coronavirus “out of an abundance of caution,” Atlanta Fire and Rescue spokesman Sgt. Cortez Stafford confirmed to AJC.com on Tuesday.  “He will also be in quarantine until his results return and will move forward based on those results,” Stafford said.  Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms on Monday announced that she tested positive for the virus.  “COVID-19 has literally hit home,” Bottoms wrote. “I have had NO symptoms and have tested positive.” — Please read more on AJC.com for updates.
  • Proms may have been canceled or delayed because of the coronavirus, but that did not stop creative teens from putting together their formal wear all made of duct tape. One gown stands out. Peyton Manker made a coronavirus-themed gown with rolls and rolls of the fix-it tape. She created images of people running from the virus to illustrate how the world tried to avoid it. She also honors those who are on the front lines, including health care workers and police, CNN reported. And what is a gown without accessories? Manker put together a coronavirus-shaped purse and mask that reads “flatten the curve,” CNN reported. Voting is still open in Duck Brand Duct Tape’s “Stuck at Prom” scholarship contest. To vote and to see Manker’s competition, click here. Winners for each category -- dress or tux -- will be awarded $10,000 each. The runners-up will get $500 and a prize pack.
  • Former President Jimmy Carter and first lady Rosalynn Carter, the longest-married presidential couple in U.S. history, celebrated their 74th wedding anniversary on Tuesday. Jimmy Carter, 95, met then-Rosalynn Smith, 92, though his younger sister, Ruth, who was childhood friends with Rosalynn. They began dating in 1945 while Jimmy Carter was home from the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. After their first date, Jimmy Carter told his mother that Rosalynn was the woman he was going to marry. The couple exchanged vows July 7, 1946, in their hometown of Plains, Georgia. Since then, they've lived in the Georgia Governor's Mansion and the White House. Together they've raised four children. In 1982, the Carters founded the Carter Center, an organization aimed at resolving issues around human rights and democracy. Their work earned the couple a Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1999. Then-President Bill Clinton said the couple has “done more good things for more people in more places than any other couple on Earth.” On his 75th birthday in 1999, Jimmy Carter said the most important decision he ever made in his life was “Marrying Rosalynn.”
  • If you see a large white dot in the sky, it is likely not an alien UFOs or even a weather balloon. Instead, it could be a large balloon that is the key to bringing internet access to remote areas. Google and its Alphabet company’s Loon division, are sending high-altitude balloons 12 miles into the sky to provide a network of internet services. The system has been in the testing phase in across the globe. On Monday, balloons were seen over Virginia and North Carolina after being tracked from Canada, WDBJ reported. The communication balloons were also sent up into the stratosphere to provide 4G LTE network connections to Kenya, The New York Times reported. Loon launched 35 balloons over the past few months to prepare for the Kenyan launch, the Times reported. This isn’t the first time the balloons were used to help facilitate communication. They were launched when Hurricane Maria destroyed cell towers in Puerto Rico in 2017. Until recently, however, they have only been used in emergency situations, according to the Times. They float on the air currents above the earth and allow people to have remote contact with family members, doctors and officials during the coronavirus pandemic, according to Tech Crunch.