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Entertainment News

    A painting at a Connecticut museum that has long been thought to be by Vincent Van Gogh has been authenticated as such by Dutch researchers. The Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford announced Friday that the oil painting 'Vase with Poppies' has been verified by researchers at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam as having been painted by the Dutch artist in 1886, just after he moved to Paris. It has been in the museum's collection since 1957. Its authenticity was called into question in 1990 by art historian and Van Gogh expert Walter Feilchenfeldt, who raised concerns about many purported Van Goghs around the world, the Hartford Courant reported. The artwork was taken out of museum displays and shelved. Years later, with advances in technology and knowledge of Van Gogh, the museum decided to revisit the question. It was examined initially at the Atheneum, where a digital X-ray revealed an underpainting that looked like a self-portrait, which added to confidence about its authenticity. The museum in Amsterdam analyzed the artwork's paint, materials and style to conclude it was indeed done by Van Gogh. 'One can say that slowly but surely, real progress is being made in Van Gogh studies. Some of these floaters even turned out to be firmly anchored in Van Gogh's oeuvre, and 'Vase with Poppies,' I am happy to say, is one of them,' said Louis van Tilborgh, a senior researcher at the Van Gogh Museum. The artwork fits stylistically with other floral paintings he made shortly after arriving in Paris. The Atheneum now officially has two Van Goghs in its collection. The other is a self-portrait painted in 1887. 'Vase with Poppies' will go back on display in April. 'These studies have revealed just how much we still need to learn about Vincent and his growth as a painter, new to Paris and exploring new avenues for his art,' Wadsworth CEO Thomas Loughman said.
  • Shaquille O’Neal and Papa John’s have joined forces, with the NBA Hall of Famer signing on as the pizza company’s new spokesperson. >> Read more trending news  On Friday, the chain announced O’Neal will join its board of directors. He will also invest in nine Papa John’s stores in Atlanta and become the restaurant’s brand ambassador. “I have truly enjoyed the high-quality Papa John’s product for years and am excited to be able to help Papa John’s raise their game to new heights,” O’Neal said in a statement. “This is a triple threat opportunity for me. I am excited to join the Board and to help lead from the top, while also investing in nine stores in my home town of Atlanta and being an ambassador for the brand ... Papa John’s is building a better culture, and I want to be a part of improving the Company from the inside out.” Jeff Smith, the chairman of the Papa John’s board of directors, is also thrilled about the partnership. “Shaquille has an excellent entrepreneurial background, including as a restaurant franchise owner, and is a natural creative marketer,” Smith said. “Shaquille has demonstrated great success through understanding the customer value proposition with product and brand differentiation.” This isn’t the first time O’Neal has collaborated with a huge brand. The four-time NBA champion and television sports analyst also has a partnership with Five Guys and owns an Atlanta-area Krispy Kreme. He’s the founder of Big Chicken, a fried chicken restaurant in Las Vegas, as well as Shaquille’s, a fine dining restaurant in Los Angeles.  Want to learn more about the business venture? Take a look at the release here. 
  • Papa John's is getting 'Shaq-ified.' The pizza chain said Friday that basketball Hall of Famer Shaquille O'Neal will be its new pitchman, appearing in TV commercials and promoting Papa John's in other ways. The company hopes O'Neal can repair its image and revive its sales after the company's founder and namesake, John Schnatter, made racially insensitive remarks. Besides being a spokesman, O'Neal will also join the company's board of directors and invest in nine of its restaurants in the Atlanta area. 'If you want to enjoy great pizza and feel loved by the people that serve the pizza, you can come back home now,' O'Neal said in an interview with The Associated Press. ''The Daddy' is here.' The problems at Papa John's started in 2017, when Schnatter criticized the NFL's leadership and blamed protests by football players for falling pizza sales. Last year it was revealed that he used a racial slur during a media training session. Schnatter apologized for the slur and the company scrubbed his face from the company's logo and pizza boxes. He is still the Louisville, Kentucky-based company's biggest shareholder. O'Neal said Schnatter's comments were 'not acceptable,' and said he told the company's executives that it needed more diversity in its leadership. He says he's the first African-American to join Papa John's board. 'We want to create a culture to let everybody know that they're loved, accepted and wanted,' O'Neal said. Papa John's International Inc. said it will pay O'Neal more than $8 million in cash and company stock for the three-year endorsement deal. Wall Street seems to think it's a winning partnership. Shares of Papa John's soared more than 6 percent Friday.
  • Gary Clark Jr. has created a lot of conversation with 'This Land,' the provocative first song off his latest album that shares the same name. In the angry blues-rock song, he recounts racial epithets hurled his way and other racist taunts before he defiantly asserts that he too is 'America's son.' In the accompanying video, young black children confront racist imagery, including a noose, among other disturbing things. Clark says the song was sparked after he sensed a change in his Austin, Texas neighborhood during the 2016 presidential election campaign between Hillary Clinton and eventual victor Donald Trump, and then a confrontation with a neighbor prompted him to write it. 'I would be driving home and I would see a lot more Trump signs than Clinton. Things in the news, there started to be conversation about — something shifted. I don't know all of it. I'm not going to try and explain all of it, but you could see it in the news and what the narrative was. Having two young ones, it kind of made me concerned about what we were getting into,' said the 35-year-old musician. Clark Jr. says a neighbor met him outside the home he'd recently purchased and told him there was no way he — a black man — could be its owner. 'I had to deal with something out in front of my house — I'm going to check the mail and I'm with my kid and I'm confronted by racism at my front door. And I'm like man, what time is it? What day is it? Where are we?' he said. 'I think it was something I was just sitting on for a while. I was taught to just be quiet and let things pass. And I was just tired of it. It's like, I'm here, we are here. Strong, confident, we're not going anywhere,' he added. 'So you're not going to tell me that I'm not worth it. You're not going to tell anyone else that they're not worth it. Because we all are.' Clark Jr. now has two children with his wife Nicole Trunfio, a white Australian model. So he laughs at Twitter trolls who have called his latest song 'reverse racism' online. 'How? Do you see my wife and my children? You know what I mean? Look at my band. We look like the Village People. There's somebody from everywhere. (Sighs.) Out of darkness comes the light. So with the rest of the album, there are brighter notes. And the idea is hope and love and just showing love to people,' Clark said. The genre-hopping artist says he crafted the rest of his album with a hip-hop producer's mindset, sampling from a wide range of musical styles, crafting lyrics about politics and his personal life, then laying down his trademark guitar riffs. 'In my mind, I'm trying to be like Dr. Dre, Dilla, DJ Premier, RZA, the Wu-Tang Clan. I love that stuff. So that's kind of what I do if I'm not playing guitar,' he said. 'In the studio, there's so many options. ... It's like man, let's just have fun with it all. So that's how I approached it. I just didn't care. I just want to make what I feel. You can call it what you want but I call it music.' Clark is currently on a tour across the United States.
  • The Latest on R. Kelly's request to travel to Dubai for concerts (all times local): 11 a.m. An overseas trip by R. Kelly is in limbo after his criminal attorney asked for more time to provide details to the court about concerts the singer wants to perform next month in Dubai. A Chicago hearing only briefly touched on a defense motion this week asking the judge in Kelly's sexual-assault case for permission to travel to earn money from up to five concerts. The filing says Kelly is scrambling to pay bills amid his legal troubles. Outside court, Kelly's entertainment attorney, Doug Anton, said any Dubai trip was off for now as contracts with Dubai concert organizers are reworked. Criminal attorney Steve Greenberg said later Kelly could still go to Dubai next month. He says he wants to provide the judge more details before any ruling. Kelly can't travel outside Illinois without the judge's permission. ___ 9:30 a.m. A judge is expected to rule on whether to allow R&B singer R. Kelly to travel overseas to perform several concerts to help the cash-strapped singer pay legal and other bills as he faces sex-abuse charges. Kelly arrived at a Chicago courthouse Friday morning for a hearing in the case. Kelly's attorneys say the 52-year-old singer hopes to perform up to five April concerts in Dubai and meet members of royal families in the United Arab Emirates. Conditions of Kelly's bond in the sex-abuse case include not traveling outside Illinois unless allowed by the judge. His attorneys say Kelly is also scrambling to pay child support because of the cancellation of Illinois concerts and a record contract. Prosecutors declined to comment on Kelly request ahead of Friday's hearing. They are expected to oppose the motion.
  • Barack Obama is feeling the love about the engagement of Jennifer Lopez and Alex Rodriguez. A-Rod shared a congratulatory handwritten note Thursday on Twitter he received from the former president and his wife, Michelle. Obama wrote: 'After 26 years together, we can say that whatever challenges life may bring, sharing them with someone you love makes it all better.' Rodriguez tweeted the note 'means the world to us.' The former Yankees shortstop and the 'World of Dance' judge got engaged earlier this month. It will be Lopez's fourth marriage and Rodriguez's second. Each has two children from previous marriages.
  • Singer R. Kelly appeared Friday morning in a Cook County courthouse as he faces accusations of sexual abuse. >> Read more trending news A lawyer for Kelly, who was charged last month with 10 counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse, filed a motion requesting he be allowed to leave the U.S. to perform from April 17 to April 19 in Dubai, WLS-TV reported. Kelly’s attorney, Steven Greenberg, asked a judge Friday to decide later on the motion, to give Kelly’s team time to gather more information to present to the court. After Friday’s hearing, a publicist for Kelly said he was no longer planning to travel to Dubai in April, WMAQ-TV reported. The reason for the cancellations was not immediately clear. Kelly is scheduled to appear in court again on May 7. >> Who is R. Kelly? Things to know about singer charged with sex abuse Greenberg said in a court filing that Kelly has been unable to find work in the United States amid backlash for the allegations against him, according to the Chicago Tribune. Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Fox said last month that the charges against Kelly stem from incidents alleged to have occurred between 1998 and 2010 with four victims, three of which were under the age of 17. “The request is outrageous, and I would be shocked if it is granted,” Michael Avenatti, an attorney representing two of Kelly’s accusers, told WLS-TV. “Were he (to) be permitted to leave, he would never return, and justice would be denied.” >> R. Kelly released from jail after someone paid his child support payment Kelly, one of the top-selling recording artists of all time, has several times over the years been accused of sexual misconduct, allegations that he’s consistently denied. Jurors acquitted Kelly of child pornography charges at a 2008 trial. Those charges stemmed from a video prosecutors alleged showed of Kelly having sex with a girl as young as 13. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • A line of classical musicians marching with picket signs in front of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's historic downtown building is fast becoming one of the city's must-see spots. About 100 of the orchestra's musicians have been on strike since March 11, at odds with orchestra officials over pension and wage issues. Their picket line has attracted support and visits from congressmen, mayoral candidates, musical theater performers and the musicians' own maestro, renowned Italian conductor Riccardo Muti. U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin planned to visit Friday. Symphony officials have canceled 17 concerts through Monday. The union has organized shifts of about a dozen picketers into four three-hour shifts daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Muti visited his musicians the second day of their picket, greeting them with hugs and handshakes and noting that their plans that day had been to be rehearsing inside Michigan Avenue's Symphony Center. 'This is a moment of crisis,' Muti said a day after the strike began, explaining that he was trying to reconcile the parties. 'The entire world, the entire musical world, is listening to what they do in Chicago.' The musicians also drew support from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who wrote them a letter saying 'the symphony's success is only possible because of your talent and dedication.' The Chicago Federation of Musicians and the orchestra have been in negotiations for nearly a year. The union's contract with the orchestra ended March 10, leading the musicians to strike the next day. The sticking points are musicians' wages and an orchestra proposal to move them from a defined benefit to a defined contribution retirement plan. Chicago Symphony Orchestra Association President Jeff Alexander said orchestra officials are trying to prevent financial challenges the symphony could face in coming years. 'What we feel is so important is that we don't enter into an agreement that puts the finances of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Association at risk,' Alexander said. 'Our projections, especially on the pension topic, show that if we don't make a change now, then a few years from now things will be quite critical.' The union questions the symphony's money management and argues that a pension is necessary to retain and attract quality musicians. 'This is really about the future of the orchestra,' said Stephen Lester, a symphony string bassist who is chairman of the union's negotiating team. 'The Chicago Symphony is a destination job. People come, like I did, in their 20s and 30s and stay their entire professional lives. We give to the community through our artistry and our performance with the orchestra. That defined benefit pension is a major part of that commitment.' No future negotiation sessions are planned. Both sides have taken a break in discussions. The last time Chicago symphony musicians went on strike was in September 2012 for two days over wages and health care costs. Musicians also picketed for about two weeks in 1991.
  • Their lives seem glamorous, but no one really knows what may be happening behind the scenes in the lives of actors and actresses. Emilia Clarke, the actress who portrays Daenerys Targaryen on the epic HBO show “Game of Thrones,” announced that she had two major health scares as she was filming the show. >>Read: First full trailer for final ‘Game of Thrones’ season is released Clarke, in a piece for The New Yorker magazine, wrote she had to undergo surgery for brain aneurysms.  It all started on Feb. 11, 2011. “I was getting dressed in the locker room of a gym in Crouch End, North London, when I started to feel a bad headache coming on. I was so fatigued that I could barely put on my sneakers. When I started my workout, I had to force myself through the first few exercises. “Then my trainer had me get into the plank position, and I immediately felt as though an elastic band were squeezing my brain. I tried to ignore the pain and push through it, but I just couldn’t.” Clarke told her trainer she needed to take a break and retreated to the locker room, where she got sick. She called the pain, which was getting worse, “shooting, stabbing, constricting.” A woman helped her get on her side, in a recovery position. Then all she remembers was someone saying she had a weak pulse and she was being taken to a hospital, where after an MRI, doctors found a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). SAH is a stroke where there is bleeding into the space around the brain. Clarke said she learned later that a third of patients with the condition die from it and there’s a high risk of a second aneurysm, often those are fatal, she said in The New Yorker column. At 24 years old she was undergoing her first brain surgery to repair the aneurysm. Doctors did what they considered “minimally invasive.” They did not open her skull that time. Instead they used endovascular coiling and used a wire fished through the femoral artery in the groin, all the way to her brain, to close the aneurysm. >> Read more trending news  But the surgery was only the first hurdle. She explains in the column, the pain of healing and the terror of not remembering her own name once she had passed the two-week-mark after surgery. She had a condition called aphasia, and was not able to speak words, only what she called nonsense. Eventually her words came back to her and she was released after a month in the hospital, weeks before a press tour and filming began on another season of “Game of Thrones.”  >>Photos: See the real life filming locations of ‘Game of Thrones’ But she wasn’t fully out of the woods. Doctors said they had found a smaller aneurysm on the other side of her brain and it could go at any moment. But she powered on with doctors monitoring her condition. She told the showrunners at “Game of Thrones,” and reported to set for season 2, despite pain and fatigue.  Flash forward to 2013, after filming was done on season 3. She was in New York, playing Holly Golightly in “Breakfast at Tiffany's” on Broadway. She had a brain scan, and doctors said the small aneurysm had doubled in size. She planned on a surgery similar to the first, two hours and done. But there was a problem during the procedure and she had to have immediate brain surgery, but the traditional way, by cutting her skull, she explained in The New Yorker. At the end of the surgery, parts of her skull were replaced by titanium and she was left with an incision from her scalp to her ear. She spent another month in the hospital recovering from the surgery, as well as, combating other fallout, anxiety, panic attacks and pain. She was afraid the news of her condition would be leaked to tabloids, and worse, that she was going to die. But she rebounded. Weeks after the surgery, she attended ComicCon in San Diego. And again she came down with a horrible headache that caused her to think, “This is it. My time is up; I’ve cheated death twice and now he’s coming to claim me.” She told her publicist what was happening as she came off the stage who told Clarke, MTV was waiting to interview her. Clarke went through with the Q&A. “I figured, if I’m going to go, it might as well be on live television.” Clarke has since healed fully and says she is “at a hundred percent.” She has also started a charity, SameYou, that provides treatment for people with brain injuries and stroke. Looking back, she thinks the warning signs of the brain bleed were there: lightheadedness and dizziness because of low blood pressure and low heart rate, a migraine that kept her in bed for days when she was 14, collapsing during drama school, but all of that she attributed to stress, she explained in The New Yorker.
  • Britain's Tate group of galleries won't accept future donations from the charitable arm of a family embroiled in the U.S. opioid crisis. The Tate says the Sackler family has given generously in the past but under 'the present circumstances we do not think it right to seek or accept further donations.' Members of the Sackler family own Stamford, Connecticut-based Purdue Pharma, maker of the prescription painkiller OxyContin. Purdue has been criticized for downplaying the addictiveness of OxyContin, but the company says its products were approved by regulators and prescribed by doctors. The statement marks the second time this week that a British museum has shunned money from the Sackler Trust. The National Portrait Gallery and the trust issued a statement Tuesday saying a 1 million-pound ($1.3 million) donation wouldn't proceed.

News

  • A Florida man is facing child sex abuse charges after officials said he paid over $800 on an Uber to bring a teenage girl to Apopka. >> Read more trending news Police said 25-year-old Richard Brown raped the 17-year-old girl in his parents' home over the course of several days. The two met over Instagram after he told the victim that he was a 19-year-old Instagram celebrity and that he would 'take care of her.' The victim told Apopka police that Brown paid for an Uber to drive her from San Antonio, Texas, to Baton Rouge, Louisiana. In Louisiana, she got into another Uber that dropped her off in Apopka on Sunday. Brown would later show police receipts showing the second part of the trip that amounted to over $800. According to arrest documents, Brown told police he was 'only friends' with the victim and thought that she was of age and 'in need of a place to stay.' One neighbor couldn't believe the accusations. 'You might never know about it and now the cops are here,' said Amanda Trail. 'That's crazy for the parents.' The victim said once she realized Brown wasn't 19 or 'Instagram famous' that she wanted to go home. Brown then allegedly told her, 'no you owe me now for bringing you all the way here.' She later told officials that she escaped on Wednesday when Brown fell asleep and while she was on Snapchat with her mother. Police would locate her near Ustler and Wekiwa Preserve Drive, but said she wasn't able to point out which home belonged to the victim or what his name was on social media.  Brown's attorney took issue with the story, citing 'several inconsistencies.' Brown faces six felony counts of child sex abuse. 
  • A jury has acquitted Michael Rosfeld Friday night in the trial of the white former police officer who shot and killed an unarmed black teen fleeing a high-stakes traffic stop outside Pittsburgh. >> WPXI LIVE UPDATES: Michael Rosfeld Trial Rosfeld was charged with homicide for shooting Antwon Rose Jr. during a traffic stop last June. Rose was riding in an unlicensed taxi that had been involved in a drive-by shooting when Rosfeld pulled the car over and shot the 17-year-old in the back, arm and side of the face as he ran away. The panel of seven men and five women — including three black jurors — saw video of the fatal confrontation, which showed Rose falling to the ground after being hit. The acquittal came after fewer than four hours of deliberations on the fourth day of the trial. The Rose family’s attorney, S. Lee Merritt, had urged a murder conviction, saying before closing arguments that it’s “pretty obvious” Rose was not a threat to Rosfeld. Rose’s death — one of many high-profile killings of black men and teens by white police officers in recent years — spurred protests in the Pittsburgh area last year, including a late-night march that shut down a major highway. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • A photo taken of a mother and daughter on the flight deck of an Atlanta-bound Delta Boeing 757 has gone viral. >> Read more trending news The duo, Capt. Wendy Rexon and First Officer Kelly Rexon, can be seen smiling ear-to-ear at the helm of the duel-engine Boeing 757, which seats around 170 passengers. The photo was taken by Dr. John R. Watret, the chancellor of Embry-Riddle Worldwide, a world-renowned aeronautical university, who just happened to overhear that there was a mother-daughter flight crew. According to a release from the university, Watret, who was a passenger on the flight, overheard a mother and kids coming from the cockpit talking about the “mother and daughter” flying the passenger airliner. “I thought that was amazing. I was in awe. I asked if I could visit them, too,” he said in the press release.   This was especially meaningful for Watret because of Embry-Riddle’s commitment to creating more opportunities for women in all areas of the aviation industry. “There has to be more diversification in the industry. It’s crucial and one of the key factors we focus on. When there are more opportunities, everyone wins,” Watret said in the release. Delta airlines official twitter account also replied to his tweet: Kelly Rexon’s sister is also a pilot, according to the release from Embry-Riddle.
  • Tulsa firefighters have returned a cat to its owner after it hitched a ride in a car for about 100 miles. Officials said they were called to rescue a cat but quickly learned it wasn't 'your typical cat stuck in a tree call.' They believe the cat jumped into the car's undercarriage in Mustang, Oklahoma, and likely rode along near the engine. The driver said he heard a noise that he thought was his child's video game, but it turned out to be the meowing cat. >> Read more trending news Firefighters made calls to the Mustang area to see if anyone had reported a lost cat and eventually found the family. They drove up to Tulsa on Friday to collect the cat, whose name is Snickers. KOKI-TV was at the fire station Friday for the reunion.
  • Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said in a letter on Friday that the city council’s attempt to have her administration investigated for potentially misusing city funds to hire her campaign staff was itself unlawful. Bottoms specifically pointed to a sentence in a resolution that the council approved on Monday that authorized the ethics officer and auditor to hire an outside law firm to assist with an investigation. “A grant of authority to hire legal counsel, such as is contained in the Resolution, violates the City of Atlanta Charter,” Bottoms wrote. “The Charter designates the City Attorney as the chief legal advisor of the city.” The letter represents an escalation of a power struggle over the mayor and city council’s respective roles to help restore public trust amid an ongoing federal probe into corruption at city hall. The resolution requesting the investigation came in response to an Atlanta Journal-Constitution article published last weekend. The article found that six Bottoms campaign staff members were issued payments for a pay period in December 2017, before the city had formally offered them jobs. That article reported that political supporters of the mayor were given job titles based on desired salaries, not their job qualifications or responsibilities. And it found that Bottoms’ former campaign manager Marva Lewis was briefly made an Airport Deputy General Manager and received payments out of airport funds, in possible violation of FAA regulations. The council resolution approved on Monday requested that the auditor and ethics office to determine if the manner in which campaign staff were hired violated city code, state law, the state constitution or Federal Aviation Administration regulations. City Auditor Amanda Noble confirmed to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Friday that she and the ethics office had initiated an investigation. Noble declined to address the contents of Bottoms’ letter. Council President Felicia Moore said resolution was not a binding order, but an expression of the council’s will to see the matter reviewed by the city’s oversight officers. She said the auditor and ethics officer are independent and have the discretion to investigate matters of their choosing. “The law department may have to assist in their getting outside counsel,” Moore said. “The reality is that neither the ethics officer nor the auditor need the council’s resolution to conduct a review.” Moore said one could read the resolution’s call for the ability to hire outside counsel as an implied request for the city’s law department to cooperate with the investigation. The law department, at least in theory, reports to both the mayor and the council. Bottoms has until early next week to decide if she will sign the proposal or veto it. If she doesn’t act eight days after it was passed, the resolution is automatically adopted. The mayor’s letter, which mentions a possible veto, was itself a veiled threat that she may take such action against a resolution that she claims violates the city’s charter. The letter itself seemed to be a preemptive attempt to call into question an investigation, which she claims grew out of a resolution that violates the city’s charter, would be allowed to move forward. Bottoms said that because of the resolution the auditors and ethics officer’s findings “would be rendered useless due to their unlawful origin.” Moore sees no reason why an investigation shouldn’t move forward. “As far as them doing their review and having the access to all city records, there should be no reason why that would change,” Moore said. “They already have the authority.”
  • Here is the letter Barr sent to leaders in Congress after he received the results of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into possible Russian Collusion during the 2016 presidential election. Dear Chairman Graham, Chairman Nadler, Ranking Member Feinstein, and Ranking Member Collins: I write to notify you pursuant to 28 C.F.R. 600.9(a)(3) that Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III has concluded his investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election and related matters. In addition to this notification, the Special Counsel regulations require that I provide you with “a description and explanation of instances (if any) in which the Attorney General” or acting Attorney General “concluded that a proposed action by a Special Counsel was so inappropriate or unwarranted under established Departmental practices that it should not be pursued.” 28 C.F.R. 600.9(a)(3). There were no such instances during the Special Counsel’s investigation. The Special Counsel has submitted to me today a “confidential report explaining the prosecution or declination decisions” he has reached, as required by 28 C.F.R. 600.8(c). I am reviewing the report and anticipate that I may be in a position to advise you of the Special Counsel’s principal conclusions as soon as this weekend. Separately, I intend to consult with Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein and Special Counsel Mueller to determine what other information from the report can be released to Congress and the public consistent with the law, including the Special Counsel regulations, and the Department’s long-standing practices and policies. I remain committed to as much transparency as possible, and I will keep you informed as to the status of my review. Finally, the Special Counsel regulations provide that “the Attorney General may determine that public release of” this notification “would be in the public interest.” 28 C.F.R. 600.9(c) I have so determined, and I will disclose this letter to the public after delivering it to you. Sincerely, William P. Barr Attorney General