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Celebrity News
Anita Baker teases fans with mention of upcoming event
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Anita Baker teases fans with mention of upcoming event

Anita Baker teases fans with mention of upcoming event
Photo Credit: John W. Ferguson/Getty Images for Grey Goose
Singer Anita Baker is going on a farewell tour in 2018.

Anita Baker teases fans with mention of upcoming event

Anita Baker sent fans into a frenzy on New Year’s Day when she announced a farewell concert. Speculation of dates and venues and cities soon followed. 

>> Read more trending news 

The vocalist behind such jazz-pop-R&B hits like “Sweet Love” and “Just Because” told fans via her Twitter account not to believe outlets that might have supposed concert dates posted, saying the information will come directly from her team in due time.

Baker, who turns 60 Jan. 26, gave fans reason to start penciling in a date when she tweeted that she would be in Atlanta May 13.

“I do know that it looks like Atlanta for Mother’s Day weekend,” Baker tweeted Jan. 4. “Tickets are not even on sale yet. Website will go up shortly with all info.”

She is also set to headline the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival this spring.

Baker said she has retired from music and would be embarking on a farewell concert earlier this month. She said that efforts to own her own material were part of the reason for her decision.

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