ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
69°
Mostly Clear
H 90° L 68°
  • cloudy-day
    69°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Clear. H 90° L 68°
  • clear-day
    90°
    Today
    Mostly Clear. H 90° L 68°
  • clear-day
    91°
    Tomorrow
    Mostly Clear. H 91° L 69°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Business News

    No matter how much money you make, if you’re not careful, you can waste quite a bit of it, especially on name brand items. It’s no secret that you can save money by opting to buy off-brand items instead of major labels. ClarkDeals.com Senior Editor Charis Brown has been saving money for some time now by choosing lesser-known brands. “We post all kinds of deals from brands and off-brands over at ClarkDeals.com,” she says.  “Typically you can find off-brand items that will work just fine, but it depends how you’ll be using the item and your preferences.” For example, Charis says she wouldn’t pay for a Yeti-brand cooler because a $16 Igloo cooler would work just fine for her needs. “But, outdoor enthusiasts might be willing to pay more for a Yeti-brand cooler because it offers an incredible amount of insulation for several days of camping or boating.” And, she says although money expert Clark Howard is not a fan of iPhones due to the price, she loves the usability of iOS, ” so I am glad to drop a few hundred on a used model.” Here are some things you may be wasting your money on Here are some of items that Charis and her team have identified that you may be spending way too much money on: 1. Name-brand TVs Charis shares Clark’s sentiment that brand isn’t as big of a deal when it comes to TVs. “The failure rate regardless of brand is really so low on TVs that I’m really unconvinced that it’s worth spending extra because it says ‘Samsung,’” Clark says. Charis says ClarkDeals sees  many great deals on off-brand TVs from stores like Fry’s Electronics, including a a 50” 4K model for $199 recently! 2. Major brand smartphones “The biggest considerations when it comes to smartphones are the processing power and memory,” Charis says. But, you can buy a name-brand refurbished smartphone for hundreds less than a new one.” EBay is a great place to find used smartphones, she says. “You’ll just want to be sure the seller has a decent return policy and warranty. Clark says the new Moto G7 is a great buy and rivals the features and functionality of the latest Android smartphones.”  3. Big-name computers “So many people overspend for a computer by overbuying on the features,” Charis says. “If you just need something for web browsing, email, and staying connected on social media, a Chromebook should work just fine. We’ve seen 11.6” 4GB Chromebooks for as low as $120! 4. Name-brand diapers Grace Del Rio of Team Clark is a big fan of Kirkland Signature diapers. “They’re not only a great deal but they’re high quality,” she says. “They have all the features Pampers have but with much better quality!” “Though Kirkland Signature are Costco-brand diapers, this is one instance you’re not exchanging a lower price for a lesser-grade item,” Charis says. 5. Top-brand athletic shoes from traditional retailers “We see all kinds of deals on athletic shoes from Nike, Asics, New Balance and Puma from $25 to $35 at online sellers like Rakuten and eBay,” Charis says. “Though traditional retailers may be selling them from $70 to over $100, most of the time you can find a deal on name-brand athletic shoes that could be 50% to 70% less than the sticker price by shopping at stores like these,” she says. “Though name brands tend to be higher quality, you can still find a deal!” 6. Expensive new cars “Automobiles is definitely an area where Americans overspend,” Charis says. “The average car loan is just under $31,000, making the average payment at $530, according to CNBC.” “We could get by with a two-year-old used car with similar features for half the price,” she says. “Because car payments tend to eat up so much of a monthly budget, it’s definitely smart to opt to spend less.” 3 steps to not wasting money on brand-name items So, as you can see, buying name-brand things can bust your budget. Charis says the best way to save is to put together a strategy. Here are some steps to follow: 1. Comparison Shop: Generally, you’re paying too much if you do not comparison shop using a tool like Google Shopping to help you understand how much items are selling for from different stores. 2. Check the price history: You can check the price history of items sold on Amazon.com using Camel Camel Camel , for example. This often gives a good indication of what the price has been at other stores, since Amazon tries to stay competitive — but not always. 3. Use Consumers Reports: If you’re curious how the experts rate the quality of off-brand vs. name brand items, Consumer Reports is a fantastic resource. Especially if you have a big purchase in mind like an appliance or a car, it’s  worth it to pay for a month’s access to research the options you’re considering! Are there certain things you always buy off-brand as opposed to name brand? Let us know in the comments below! This article was originally published on Clark.com The post 6 common items you’re spending too much money on appeared first on Clark Howard.
  • Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver's British restaurant chain has become insolvent, putting 1,300 jobs at risk. The firm said Tuesday that it had gone into administration, a form of bankruptcy protection, and appointed KPMG to oversee the process. The company operates 23 Jamie's Italian restaurants in the U.K. Oliver, known around the world for his cookbooks and television shows, said he was 'deeply saddened by this outcome and would like to thank all of the staff and our suppliers who have put their hearts and souls into this business for over a decade.' He said 'I appreciate how difficult this is for everyone affected.
  • J.C. Penney and Kohl's struggled during the start of the year, raising concern about the challenges for the department store industry ahead. Penney reported a wider than expected loss and sales declines during the first quarter while Kohl's cut its fiscal 2020 profit outlook as it struggled with slumping sales in the quarter. Meanwhile, Home Depot reported better than expected profit and revenue for the first quarter despite a damp start to 2019. That inclement weather and an extra week in the previous fiscal year dragged down the home improvement retailer's comparable store sales. The downbeat reports from the mid-priced department stores, announced Tuesday, were in contrast to Macy's performance, reported last week. Macy's first-quarter profit smashed Wall Street estimates. Macy's also put up its sixth consecutive quarter of increases in comparable store sales — or sales in stores open a year — fueled by its robust online business after a three-year sales slump. But it also said that President Trump's escalating trade war could mean higher prices for Macy's customers. Department stores have been trying to reinvent themselves as more shoppers go online. They've also been hurt by increasing competition from the likes of T.J. Maxx and other off-price stores, which offer coveted brands at discount prices. So, retailers have been offering more exclusive merchandise and expanding online services. Last month, Kohl's said it was expanding is partnership with Amazon, with plans to accept Amazon returns in all of its 1,150 stores starting in July. But apparently, those efforts didn't translate to higher sales. 'The year has started off slower than we'd like, with our first quarter sales coming in below our expectation,' said Michelle Gass, Kohl's CEO in a statement. 'We are actively addressing the opportunities that impacted our first quarter sales, and we have strong initiatives that will enhance our sales performance in the second half.' Penney, meanwhile, has been struggling for several years and is still trying to claw its way back after a disastrous reinvention plan in 2012 by its former CEO Ron Johnson. J.C. Penney Co. reported a quarterly loss of $154 million, or 48 cents per share. Losses, adjusted for one-time gains and costs, came to 46 cents per share. That's worse than the per share loss of 39 cents Wall Street was expecting, according to a survey by Zacks Investment Research. The Plano, Texas-based company's revenue was $2.56 billion, down 5.6%. Same-store sales fell 5.5%. The company attributed part of the sales drop to its move to get rid of major appliances and furniture, which were eating away at profit margins. Kohl's Corp., based in Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin, reported fiscal first-quarter net income of $62 million, or 38 cents per share. Earnings, adjusted for asset impairment costs, came to 61 cents per share, missing the average Street estimate of 67 cents per share. The department store operator posted revenue of $4.09 billion in the period, also falling short of forecasts of $4.2 billion. Kohl's now expects full-year earnings per share earnings in the range of $5.15 to $5.45, down from a previous range of $5.80 to $6.15. Analysts expect $6.03 per share for the year, according to FactSet estimates. Kohl's shares tumbled more than 9%, or $5.62, to $57.29 in premarket trading, while J.C. Penney's shares fell down more than 8%, or 10 cents, to $1.05 per share. _____ Portions of this story were generated by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research. Access a Zacks stock report on JCP at https://www.zacks.com/ap/JCP
  • Home Depot reported better than expected profit and revenue for the first quarter despite a damp start to 2019. That inclement weather and an extra week in the previous fiscal year weighed on the home improvement retailer's comparable store sales. Comparable store sales, a key gauge of a retailer's health, increased 2.5%, short of the 4.2% expected by industry analysts, according to a survey Zacks Investment Research. In the U.S., same-store sales climbed 3%. Shares declined less than 1% before the market opened Tuesday. Neil Saunders, managing director of GlobalData Retail, said weather was not the only thing Home Depot had to deal with. 'The consumer economy was also more unfavorable than last year, when tax cuts, good tax refunds and generally high confidence were all boosting spend,' Saunders said. 'While shoppers are far from being in the doldrums, the prevailing attitude now is more cautious and careful.' Home Depot customers did spend more in the quarter, but barely, with the average ticket climbing 2%. The number of customer transactions also improved, up 3.8% from a year earlier. The Atlanta company still foresees fiscal 2019 earnings up about 3.1% from fiscal 2018 to $10.03 per share. It maintains sales will rise by approximately 3.3%. The Home Depot Inc. earned $2.51 billion, or $2.27 per diluted share, for the three months ended May 5. That compares with $2.4 billion, or $2.08 per diluted share, a year ago. That easily beat the $2.16 per share analysts polled by Zacks were calling for. Revenue rose to $26.38 billion from $24.95 billion, also topping expectations. _____ Portions of this story were generated by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research. Access a Zacks stock report on HD at https://www.zacks.com/ap/HD
  • Most global stock markets rose Tuesday after the U.S. government issued a 90-day grace period on its order to bar U.S. firms from selling to Chinese telecom gear maker Huawei. The reprieve eases the immediate hit on U.S. suppliers and has at least temporarily quelled investors' anxiety over the curbs on sales to Huawei, which had been dragging down Wall Street. Also Tuesday, the founder of Huawei expressed confidence that Washington's curbs on sales to the Chinese tech giant will have little impact on the company. He said it is discussing 'emergency relief' from Google for possible loss of services for its smartphone business. Ren Zhengfei said the company has 'supply backups' if it loses access to American components. London's FTSE 100 rose 0.7% to 7,359 points and Frankfurt's DAX gained 0.9% to 12,150. France's CAC 40 was more than 0.4% higher at 5,382. On Wall Street, future contracts for the Standard & Poor's 500 index gained 0.5% to 2,857. The same for the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 0.4% to 25,804. Anxiety over U.S.-Chinese trade tension was reignited last week by Washington's decision to require export licenses for technology sales to Huawei Technologies Ltd. American officials say the biggest global maker of network gear for phone carriers is a security risk, which Huawei denies. That followed new tariff hikes announced by both sides in a broader battle over Beijing's technology ambitions and trade surplus. Both sides are 'seemingly digging in for a battle of attrition,' said Mizuho Bank in a report. It said investors are trying to figure out the duration, the impact on profits and the 'toxic atmosphere for American sales in China.' In Asia, the Shanghai Composite Index gained 1.2% to 2,905.47 while Tokyo's Nikkei 225 lost 0.1% to 21,272.45. Hong Kong's Hang Seng shed just 0.5% to 27,657.24 and Seoul's Kospi advanced 0.3% to 2,061.25. Sydney's S&P-ASX 200 added 0.4% to 6,500.10 and Taiwan also gained. New Zealand and Singapore retreated. ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude gained 30 cents to $63.40 in electronic trading on the new York Mercantile Exchange. Brent crude, used to price international oils, also gained 40 cents to $72.37 per barrel in London. CURRENCY: The dollar gained to 110.47 yen from Monday's 110.06 yen. The euro declined to $1.1160 from $1.1169.
  • The British government on Tuesday debated tweaking its proposed European Union divorce terms in a last-ditch attempt to get Parliament's backing for Prime Minister Theresa May's deal with the bloc. The Cabinet met to work out details of what May has called a 'bold offer' to win support for her Brexit agreement. But divided ministers looked unlikely to support the kind of sweeping alterations that could change lawmakers' minds on a divorce deal that has been rejected three times by Parliament. Britain was due to leave the EU on March 29, but the bloc extended the deadline until Oct. 31 amid the political impasse. Talks on securing a compromise between May's Conservatives and the opposition Labour Party broke down last week. May says she will try again in early June by asking lawmakers to vote on a withdrawal agreement bill implementing the departure terms. The bill is likely to include promises on issues such as workers' rights and environmental protections that are priorities for the left-of-center Labour Party. But Labour foreign affairs spokeswoman Emily Thornberry said 'we're going to vote against it' unless it is 'radically different.' Thornberry said the latest attempt to pass the Brexit deal was doomed and was May's 'own political version of the last rites.' May has said that after Parliament votes on the bill she will set out a timetable for her departure as Conservative leader and prime minister. Pro-Brexit Conservatives blame May for the political deadlock and want to replace her with a staunch Brexit supporter such as Boris Johnson, a former foreign secretary. In a sign of the splits within the government over Britain's departure from the EU, Treasury chief Phillip Hammond cautioned against trying to leave the bloc without an agreement on trade and other terms. Hammond planned to tell a business dinner that politicians 'on the populist right' were trying to redefine Brexit to mean a no-deal departure. In extracts released in advance, Hammond said that 'to advocate for 'no deal' is to hijack the result of the referendum, and in doing so, knowingly to inflict damage on our economy and our living standards.
  • Companies specializing in nuclear demolition and radioactive waste storage are buying up aging U.S. reactors and promising to decommission them in dramatically less time than their utility owners had planned — eight years instead of 60 in some cases. Viewed by experts as an emerging trend in the nuclear power industry, the sales of these retired or soon-to-be-retired reactors present a paradox for residents, state officials and nuclear watchdogs. Once a reactor is shut down, the radioactive mess left behind must be cleaned up, spent nuclear fuel packed for long-term storage and the plant itself dismantled. Few argue that decommissioning a facility within a matter of years is less preferable than the decades-long approach called 'safe storage,' in which shuttered plants are left dormant while radioactive elements slowly decay. Yet the speedier approach raises questions about whether the timetables are consistent with environmentally safe cleanups, and whether the buyers have the experience and money to manage multiple projects. 'When it was 60 years, we were up in arms that it was 60 years,' said Janet Tauro, chair of New Jersey Clean Water Action, referring to initial plans for decommissioning Oyster Creek in Forked River. The nation's oldest commercial reactor closed last year , shortly after owner Exelon Generation announced the sale to Holtec International. 'And then we hear it's going to be expedited to eight years,' Tauro continued. 'It's great to get it over with but are there corners that are going be cut?' Holtec, a privately held, global corporation that manufactures giant containers for storing spent radioactive fuel after it is removed from reactor cores, also has deals in place to buy several plants owned by Entergy Corp., including: Pilgrim in historic Plymouth, Massachusetts, closing May 31; Palisades in Covert, Michigan, slated for closure in 2022 ; and two reactors expected to close within two years at Indian Point in Buchanan, New York, according to public statements and documents filed with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. 'Our commitment to the nuclear industry includes taking ownership of shutdown nuclear plants so that we can safely and efficiently decommission the plants so that the land can be returned to productive use,' Holtec spokeswoman Joy Russell said in an email. The company did not make officials available for interview, but strongly defended its 30-year nuclear industry track record. The proposed sales await NRC approval, with decisions expected in the coming weeks and months, agency spokesman Neil Sheehan said. In March, the NRC asked Holtec for additional guarantees that its decommissioning subsidiary has sufficient resources to handle multiple cleanups simultaneously. In a response letter, Holtec outlined a plan for corporate oversight of the decommissioning projects and said 'dedicated leadership' at each site would include some current employees who will remain on during the transition. In legal briefs filed with the NRC, Massachusetts officials including Attorney General Maura Healey have expressed skepticism about Holtec's plan to 'decommission Pilgrim on an expedited schedule never before achieved,' despite having never owned a nuclear plant nor managed a decommissioning start to finish. Holtec executives tout 'cutting edge technologies' that speed the removal of superhot spent fuel from the reactor pool. Fuel that can no longer sustain a nuclear reaction remains radioactive and still generates substantial heat. Under federal protocols, spent fuel rods are typically placed in pools filled with water and reinforced with concrete to prevent leakage. Used fuel generally stays in the pool for at least five years, and 10 years is the industry norm, according to the NRC, allowing for enough cooling so it can be safely moved into so-called 'dry storage' casks. Holtec has designed a cask it says can accept spent fuel after only two years, allowing for a complete transfer from the 'wet storage' pool within three years. While there are clear risks attached to transferring spent fuel too quickly, experts also note there remains a slight risk of a catastrophic leak or fire for as long as the fuel remains in the pools. Seven U.S. reactors have closed since 2013 and at least a dozen more could follow over the next decade, many pushed into retirement by factors such as competition from cheaper energy sources like natural gas. 'Due to the lowering gas prices, it's a very difficult market to run a nuclear power station,' said Patrick O'Brien, spokesman for Pilgrim, which got a 20-year extension to its original 40-year license but ultimately is shutting down after 47 years. In January, privately held NorthStar Group Services completed the purchase of Vermont Yankee from New Orleans-based Entergy after federal and state regulators approved the sale of the reactor, closed since 2014. It marked the first permanent transfer of an operating license to a nuclear cleanup specialist for accelerated decommissioning. NorthStar hopes to announce another transaction soon. 'It saves a lot of money and that's what allows these projects to happen now instead of 50 years from now,' said Scott State, New York City-based NorthStar's president. There's more at stake than just demolishing the plants. Once removed from the plant itself, the spent fuel has nowhere to go and must remain indefinitely at or near the site, under 24-hour guard, because picking a permanent national nuclear waste storage site has proven too politically radioactive. NorthStar and Holtec have proposed interim waste storage facilities in Texas and New Mexico, respectively, which could allow for the centralized storage of spent fuel but which also face legal and regulatory hurdles. As Holtec moves to become a key player in decommissioning and nuclear waste storage, it has been fending off scrutiny for its role in a mishap during decommissioning of the San Onofre nuclear plant in San Diego County last August. No radiation was released, but the NRC called the incident a 'near miss' and fined plant owner Southern California Edison $116,000, according to agency documents. An inspection report determined some Holtec procedures had been inadequate or not properly followed, and the company's own evaluation cited oversight shortcomings. Massachusetts officials have stopped short of asking the NRC to block Pilgrim's sale, but they have cited the incident at the California plant while questioning whether the money in Pilgrim's decommissioning trust fund is enough to cover unexpected delays or cost overruns. By Holtec's own accounting, the estimated $1.13 billion decommissioning would conclude with $3.6 million to spare in the trust fund, a cushion described as 'meager' by state officials. Potential shortfalls could pose 'significant health, safety, environmental, financial and economic risks,' the state argued in a request for public hearings. Holtec said its equipment had never been involved in a major accident and stood by its cost estimates, noting it will save by foregoing decades of maintaining and monitoring plants during safe storage. 'There's a natural tendency to say, 'Oh, they're doing it fast, they're going to make mistakes, it's not going to be safe,'' said Rod McCullum, senior director of decommissioning and used fuel at the Nuclear Energy Institute, a Washington-based advocacy group for nuclear power. 'You're actually getting safer by getting faster.' Situated along scenic, environmentally sensitive Cape Cod Bay, Pilgrim has a history of unscheduled shutdowns and was only recently removed from an NRC list of the nation's least safe reactors . The citizen's group Pilgrim Watch, which has long advocated for the fast-approaching day when the plant closes for good, remains wary of what lies ahead in decommissioning. 'The story isn't over. There's a sequel,' said Mary Lampert, the organization's longtime director. 'And sometimes the sequel, like in the movies, is worse than the main show.
  • The Latest on U.S. restrictions on sales to Chinese technology giant Huawei (all times local): 7:00 p.m. Chinese tech giant Huawei's top executive in the European Union is lashing out at the Trump administration's recently announced trade ban on the company and says other firms should be worried, too. The U.S. government says Huawei is a security risk and issued an order last week requiring government permission for sales of U.S. technology to the company, which denies accusations it facilitates Chinese spying. Huawei's chief representative to the EU institutions, Abraham Liu, said Tuesday that 'those among us who cherish the rule of law should be worried.' Lamenting what he says is 'bullying' by the administration, Lui said: 'What has happened to the sacrosanct presumption of innocence?' He says: 'Today it is happening to Huawei, tomorrow it can happen to any other company.' ___ 6:00 p.m. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has cut its forecast for world growth this year and warned about the impact of the escalating trade tensions. The organization, which advises industrialized nations on policy, said Tuesday it expects the global economy to grow 3.2% this year, down from its previous forecast of 3.3%. It singles out trade tensions as the 'principal factor weighing on the world economy' and notes that trade is expected to grow just 2% this year, which would be the lowest in a decade. The U.S. and China are engaged in a dispute over economic and technological supremacy that has seen both sides raise tariffs on hundreds of billions of dollars of traded goods. The OECD's chief economist, Laurence Boone, says 'the fragile economy is being destabilized by trade tensions.' ___ 5:35 p.m. A Chinese foreign ministry spokesman has accused Washington of misusing 'state power' to hurt foreign companies and interfere in commercial markets. The spokesman, Lu Kang, said in a routine briefing on Tuesday that 'The Chinese government has determination and ability to safeguard its legitimate and lawful rights and interests.' Responding to a question about President Donald Trump's comment that a trade deal with Beijing has to be more beneficial to the U.S. than China, Lu said it was 'unscientific and unprofessional' to assume that there must always be a winner and a loser in trade relations between the two countries. He said any agreement must be balanced, equal and mutually beneficial. Lu also said that using government power to 'crackdown' on foreign companies and interfere in markets would not be in the interest of the U.S. ___ 4:44 p.m. The founder of Huawei says U.S. restrictions on sales to the Chinese tech giant will have little impact and the company is talking with Google about the possible effect on its smartphone business. Ren Zhengfei told Chinese reporters Tuesday in comments broadcast by state TV the company has 'supply backups' if it loses access to American chips and other technology under last week's order. Washington says Huawei is a security threat and imposed imposing restrictions last week on technology sales to the company. Ren said those control 'will have no impact within this company' but some low-end business might be affected. He said Huawei and Google are discussing possible 'emergency relief measures' for its smartphone business, which might lose access to some of the American company's services.
  • The founder of Huawei expressed confidence Washington's curbs on sales to the Chinese tech giant will have little impact and said Tuesday it is discussing 'emergency relief' from Google for possible loss of services for its smartphone business. Huawei Technologies Ltd., the biggest maker of network gear for phone carriers, has 'supply backups' if it loses access to American components, Ren Zhengfei told Chinese reporters. His comments were broadcast by state TV and other outlets. The Trump administration's order last week steps up pressure on Huawei, which Washington says is a security risk, and threatens to hamper sales of network gear and other products. Huawei is the No. 2 global smartphone brand but relies on Google's Android operating system and U.S. components suppliers. China's government repeated its promise to defend Chinese companies abroad but gave no details of what Beijing might do. American officials say Huawei and other Chinese telecom equipment vendors are a risk because they beholden to the ruling Communist Party. Huawei denies accusations it facilitates Chinese spying. The U.S. controls 'will have no impact within this company' and none on development of next-generation telecom technology, Ren said. He said some low-end business might be affected. Huawei has developed its own chips for some smartphones and other products but relies on American suppliers for its most advanced components. Huawei and Google are discussing possible 'emergency relief measures' for its smartphone business, which might lose access to some of the American company's services, Ren said. He gave no details. Google, a unit of Alphabet Inc., said Monday its basic services still will work on Huawei smartphones, which use its Android operating system. Google gave no details of what services might be curtailed. But the company would be barred from transferring hardware or software directly to Huawei. That would affect maps or other services that require the American company's support. Huawei trails only Samsung of South Korea in global smartphone sales. Industry analysts say it might struggle to compete if it cannot line up replacements for Google services that run afoul of the U.S. curbs. 'I should say this impact will be very big, but Google is an extremely good company,' Ren said. 'We are discussing emergency relief measures.' A foreign ministry spokesman accused Washington of misusing 'state power' to hurt foreign companies and interfere in commercial markets. 'The Chinese government has determination and ability to safeguard its legitimate and lawful rights and interests,' said the spokesman, Lu Kang. Apple Inc., Huawei's main American rival in smartphones, makes a prominent potential target for Beijing. The company's iPhones are assembled in China and the country is its No. 2 market after the United States. Attacking Apple might be politically awkward for Chinese leaders who have accused Washington of mistreating Huawei. Business groups say Chinese officials are trying to reassure American companies they are welcome despite Beijing's tariff war with President Donald Trump. But regulators have an array of tools including tax and safety inspections that can hamper a company with no official acknowledgement it is targeted. Huawei's U.S. sales collapsed in 2012 after a congressional panel told phone carriers to avoid the company and its smaller Chinese competitor, ZTE Corp., as security threats. Despite that, Huawei's sales elsewhere have grown rapidly. The company reported earlier its global sales rose 19.5% last year over 2017 to 721.2 billion ($105.2 billion). Profit rose 25.1% to 59.3 billion yuan ($8.6 billion). Huawei smartphone shipments rose 50 percent over a year earlier in the first three months of 2019 to 59.1 million, while the global industry's total fell 6.6%, according to IDC. Shipments by Samsung and No. 3 Apple declined. Last week's order, however, threatens to disrupt Huawei's global business by limiting access to components for products sold everywhere, not just in the U.S. market. It will take effect after a 90-day grace period that will allow some transactions to allow telecom operators that depend on Huawei equipment for 'critical services' time to make other arrangements, the U.S. Department of Commerce said Monday in a notice on its website. Washington has tried to persuade U.S. allies to shun Huawei as a supplier of fifth-generation technology. Australia, Taiwan and some other governments have imposed curbs on use of Huawei technology, but Germany, France and other countries still do business with the company. ___ AP researcher Shanshan Wang contributed.
  • Asian stocks were mixed Tuesday after anxiety over U.S. restrictions on sales to Chinese tech giant Huawei pulled Wall Street lower. Benchmarks in Shanghai and Seoul advanced, while Tokyo, Hong Kong and Sydney declined. Anxiety over U.S.-Chinese trade tension was reignited by Washington's decision to require export licenses for technology sales to Huawei Technologies Ltd. American officials say the biggest global maker of network gear for phone carriers is a security risk, which Huawei denies. That followed new tariff hikes announced by both sides in a broader battle over Beijing's technology ambitions and trade surplus. Both sides are 'seemingly digging in for a battle of attrition,' said Mizuho Bank in a report. It said investors are trying to figure out the duration, the impact on profits and the 'toxic atmosphere for American sales in China.' The Shanghai Composite Index gained 0.3% to 2,880.71 while Tokyo's Nikkei 225 lost 0.5 percent to 21,203.33. Hong Kong's Hang Seng shed 0.3% to 27,688.12 and Seoul's Kospi advanced 0.5% to 2,066.48. Sydney's S&P-ASX 200 retreated 0.3% to 6,458.50 and benchmarks in Taiwan and New Zealand also declined. On Wall Street, chipmakers led the way lower as traders weighed the implications of the sales controls on Huawei, a major customer. The U.S. government says suppliers including Huawei and its smaller Chinese rival, ZTE Corp., pose an espionage threat because they are beholden to China's ruling Communist Party. Huawei denies it facilitates Chinese spying. The Standard & Poor's 500 index lost 0.7% to 2,840.23 points. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 0.3% to 25,679.90. The technology-heavy Nasdaq composite slid 1.5% to 7,702.38. Apple Inc. skidded after an analyst warned the iPhone maker's growth prospects could dim as Washington and Beijing spar over trade. Qualcomm, which gets about 65% of its revenue from China, slumped 6%. Broadcom, which gets nearly half of its revenue from China, also fell 6%. Intel dropped 3% and Xilinx slid 3.6%. An S&P index that measures the performance of chip and chip equipment makers fell nearly 4%. ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude gained 33 cents to $72.30 per barrel in electronic trading on the new York Mercantile Exchange. The contract fell 24 cents on Monday to close at $71.97. Brent crude, used to price international oils, advanced 29 cents to $63.50 per barrel in London. It advanced 29 cents the previous session to $63.21. CURRENCY: The dollar gained to 110.17 yen from Monday's 110.06 yen. The euro was little-changed at $1.1167.

News

  • New cellphone video appears to show a Florida substitute teacher body slam a student while breaking up a fight between at least two students. >> Watch the news report here Witnesses told ActionNewsJax that this happened Monday at Terry Parker High School in Jacksonville. ActionNewsJax spoke exclusively with Towyhia McAffee, who says her 15-year-old son was the one tackled. “You slammed my son,” she said. “You picked him up and slammed him.” She said her son is the teen shown wearing a cast in the video. “Do you intend to make any kind of complaint?” ActionNewsJax reporter Russell Colburn asked. “Absolutely,” she said. >> Read more trending news  Last week, after at least five recent allegations of teachers hitting students came into the ActionNewsJax newsroom, Colburn sat down with superintendent Dr. Diana Greene to discuss training. “Is there ever a situation where a teacher would want to put their hands on a student?” Colburn asked. “There should never be a situation where a teacher wants to put their hands on a student, unless they are preventing they are preventing that student from hurting themselves or hurting someone else,” Greene said. Duval County Public Schools policy does state the teacher 'must act reasonably given the circumstances when they intervene.' McAffee said that didn’t happen here. “Something needs to be done about that,” she said. “That’s not right.” ActionNewsJax followed up with DCPS on this specific case for more information on the teacher and what may have led up to the fight, but officials said that because fighting is a student disciplinary situation, they won’t provide details or comment further.
  • A father in Tuscumbia, Alabama, surprised his daughter’s entire second-grade class with a field trip to her favorite place. But Jeremy Smith’s little girl wasn’t among the kids jumping and laughing at the town’s local trampoline business, Sky Zone. Jaleia Smith died in September after the family was involved in a car crash, WHNT reported. Weeks before the crash, Jaleia and her friends celebrated her 8th birthday at the same Sky Zone. >> Read more trending news  So, to remember his daughter, and to thank the school and students for everything they have done for him this year since Jaleia’s death, Jeremy Smith treated all 111-second grade students at G.W. Trenholm Primary School to a surprise field trip to the trampoline business, WHNT reported. Her friends still miss the little girl. “[We] try to have as much fun as we can, but sometimes we can’t have as much fun as we would have if she was here,” Mia Awwad told WHNT.  Jaleia’s friends have tried to keep her memory alive too over the past school year. They retired her student number and planted a tree in her memory. They also left messages to Jaleia on the chalkboard in her classroom, according to WHNT.
  • Sisters Hailey and Hannah Hagor of North Carolina spent the weekend selling lemonade to pay off their classmates’ lunch debt. >> Watch the news report here >> Fired lunch lady was 'dishonest,' didn't follow rules, food vendor says Student lunch debt at Southwood Elementary in Davidson County is up to $3,100. >> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news  “There's one family that owes $800,” the girls’ mother, Erin Hager, said. “I don't know how many years worth that is, but it's a big deal.' >> Read more trending news  The girls also sold chili, hot dogs and chips. >> See the girls' Facebook page here More than $40,000 is owed to schools across Davidson County.
  • Maybe they just wanted to go for a joyride? Three bear cubs recently crawled into a man's car in Gatlinburg, Tennessee – and the shocking moment was caught on camera. >> Gatlinburg SkyBridge: Nation's longest pedestrian suspension bridge opens in Tennessee According to WFIE, Chad Morris of Owensboro, Kentucky, was visiting the popular tourist destination last week when he spotted the undesignated drivers taking over his vehicle. Photos show the bears peeking out the windows, which Morris had left open, and getting cozy behind the steering wheel as their mother watches from the street. >> Read more trending news  'Is this real life?' Morris captioned the pictures in a Facebook book Thursday. 'Tell me we are being punked.'  >> See the Facebook post here >> Watch a video of the moment here In a Facebook comment, Morris said the bears eventually 'climbed out and took off back down the mountain.' 'I knew as soon as they got out and went down the hill, I put my windows up and they stayed up every time I parked,' Morris told WFIE. Thankfully, Morris’ new furry friends didn’t cause too much damage, though a bear did take “a chunk out of the seat,” he said. Read more here.
  • Police in Phoenix are trying to find the woman they said left a toddler in a stroller in the middle of a shopping center parking lot Saturday. The child, who is between 1 and 2 years old and was asleep in the stroller, is in the custody of the Arizona Department of Child Safety, KTVK reported. >> Read more trending news  The little boy was discovered by a bystander. The stroller was in a parking space near a fast-food restaurant, and was partially hidden under food wrappers and what police described as “other junk,” according to KTVK. “Someone who was on their way to work was walking by a pile of really just debris and among that debris was a stroller and inside the stroller was a little moving leg,” Phoenix Police Sgt. Vince Lewis told KTVK. The boy was taken to an area hospital to be checked out. He wasn’t hurt, KTVK reported.
  • A child was injured after being struck by a Boston Police cruiser Monday night. Boston Police say just after 7 p.m., they received a call of a pedestrian struck on Shawmut Avenue in Roxbury.  The pedestrian, who police said is a 1-year-old child, was taken to the hospital with minor injuries after being hit. The child's mother tells us her daughter suffered a broken collarbone in the crash.  >> Read more trending news  No additional information was released.