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College

    Perhaps owing to the weather or the Easter holiday, the 2019 edition of G-Day wasn’t as well attended as coach Kirby Smart’s previous three spring-practice finales, but it was a pretty entertaining game as these sorts of affairs go, with the Red team coming from behind to defeat the Black team 22-17. Here are five observations from Saturday’s game, as they relate to the Bulldogs’ 15 spring practices. Plays of noteGeorgia coach Kirby Smart has talked throughout the spring about the defense creating havoc, and he had to be happy with Eric Stokes, who intercepted a Jake Fromm pass in the first quarter and returned it 39 yards for a touchdown. … D’Andre Swift rushed three times for 39 yards and had a nice 27-yard run in the second quarter that set up a 13-yard scoring pass from Fromm to Brian Herrien. … Backup quarterback Stetson Bennett threw a 52-yard completion to wide receiver Matt Landers, who atoned for a drop earlier in the second quarter. … Latavius Brini created more havoc with a third-quarter interception. … With eight minutes remaining in the third quarter, early-enrollee quarterback D’Wan Mathis scored a touchdown, but it came the receiving end of a 39-yard pass from Landers, who took the handoff on a reverse. … With eight minutes left in the fourth quarter, Bennett (who played for both the Red and Black squads) tossed a 43-yard touchdown pass to Jeremiah Holloman. Great first impressions, Part 1Mathis, who enrolled at Georgia in January, made a favorable first impression on Bulldogs fans, as he completed 15 of 28 passes for 113 yards and one interception. The 4-star prospect also rushed nine times and had a long run of 20 yards, but five sacks left him with minus-2 yards rushing. “He did a great job, and it was great for his confidence,” Swift said. “It was a good springboard for him going into fall workouts. I thought he did a great job today.” “Going through spring with him and him being an early enrollee, I just knew he was real athletic had good speed,” added Landers who when not throwing the ball for the Black team caught two passes – including the 52-yarder from Bennett – for 54 yards. “He played a little bit of everything in high school, so I knew he had some hands.” Great first impressions, Part 2While Mathis no doubt received a good bit of attention for his play, there were a number of early enrollees who turned in solid performances for Georgia.  Linebacker Nakobe Dean was the Black team’s second-leading tackler with five, while fellow linebacker Nolan Smith recorded two tackles. For the Red team’s defense, Lewis Cine led with eight tackles, including six solos. Tyrique Stevenson was the Red team’s third-leading tackler with five, and defensive back D.J. Daniel had three tackles and two pass breakups. Passing fancySmart generally likes to put the ball in the air on G-Day, and Saturday was no different, as the Black team rolled up 245 passing yards and the Red team recorded 244 air yards. Fromm didn’t start out well with the interception by Stokes in the game’s first offensive series, but he settled down and finished with 14 completions in 29 attempts for 116 yards and a scoring strike to Herrien. “I didn’t throw it as clean as I wanted to today. It is what it is,” Fromm said. “… I think we’ve done a great job the other 14 practices throwing the ball around and making big plays.” Besides Mathis’ impressive day, Bennett – who returned to Georgia in January after a year of junior college seasoning – played for both the Red and the Black, completing a total of 12 of 23 passes for 110 yards. Sophomore John Seter also got in on the action, completing 1 of 2 passes for 11 yards. “I was a little worried about the weather conditions, being able to throw the ball,” Smart said. “I thought it might get sloppy, but the weather helped out and cooperated toward the end. We were able to throw the ball, especially in the first half, when the conditions were pretty good and there was less wind.” One of the quarterbacks’ targets was missing. Fans hoping to see Demetris Robertson’s G-Day debut were no doubt disappointed by his absence. The junior receiver, who transferred from Cal last summer but didn’t do much last season, was sick Friday night and unavailable for Saturday, Smart said. Ain’t that a kick?In the realm of the kicking game, Georgia is well established with senior Rodrigo Blankenship, who in his storied career has connected on 53 of 64 field-goal attempts and has made all 65 of his point-after tries for a total of 313 points. Place-kickers accounted for 15 of Georgia’s combined 39 points, with Blankenship making a 23-yard field goal in the first quarter and an extra point in the second quarter.  Based on Saturday’s scrimmage, the Bulldogs’ kicking game should be in good shape beyond 2019 as sophomore Jake Camarda (also the team’s punter), sophomore Brooks Buce and redshirt freshman Jack Podlesny were all called upon and came through. Buce kicked two extra points and a 42-yard field goal. Camarda added a 49-yard field goal (but later had an extra-point attempt blocked), and Podlesny tallied the final points of the day with a 38-yard field goal with about a minute to play. Blankenship, who has been the face of the kicking game for the past three seasons, said he feels confident his colleagues will carry the banner once he’s gone. “It was great to see all our guys get some opportunities,” he said. “I wish I could play here longer; I’ve had such an incredible time here at UGA. I’m really looking forward to my last season, and the reality is kickers have been here before me and will be here long after me, so I was really proud of the way some of our guys came out and performed. I was really happy to see everybody get opportunities to come out and kick today.” 
  • Georgia Tech football player Brandon Adams was practicing “step dancing” — or stepping — with friends when he collapsed and hit his head late Saturday night, according to an Atlanta police report, leading to the death of the popular Yellow Jackets player that has stunned the team and fan base. According to the report, friends of Adams told Georgia Tech police that they were practicing stepping in the garage area of a townhouse near Tech’s campus when they took a water break, which is when Adams fell backward and hit his head. After going into convulsions, he began to foam at the mouth. He was taken by friends to Emory University Hospital Midtown — hospital personnel told police that he was alive when he arrived — and was later pronounced dead. The report further stated that Adams’ passing appeared to be natural, that there was no apparent foul play involved. Stepping is a dance form common among African-American fraternities and sororities. The fraternity Omega Psi Phi acknowledged to Channel 2 Action News earlier this week that Adams was a candidate to join the fraternity. On Sunday, the organization suspended its “Membership Selection Process” and social activities without explanation. Two messages left Friday with the fraternity and another with its attorney were not returned. The GBI performed an autopsy on Adams on Monday, but determined that more tests, including toxicology, were needed to determine the cause and manner of death. Atlanta police issued a statement with the report to the AJC: “Nothing in Mr. Adams’ autopsy by the GBI on Monday pointed to foul play and we have no evidence right now to merit a criminal investigation. Witnesses have told our investigators that Adams had been participating in a dance routine when he collapsed suddenly. The Department is awaiting toxicology and other lab results being tested by the GBI following the autopsy to determine our next step.” According to the GBI website, the agency uses toxicology tests “to establish whether traces of alcohol, drugs or points are present, and if so, in what quantity.” It may be several weeks before the tests are completed. A rising senior for the Jackets team known for his smile and bear hugs and who held considerable promise as a defensive tackle, the 21-year-old Adams was mourned in a memorial on Monday evening at McCamish Pavilion. A funeral for Adams, from Brentwood, Tenn., also will be held Saturday in Nashville. Staff writer Eric Stirgus contributed to this article.
  • A giver of hugs and a hefty but nimble defensive lineman, Georgia Tech football player Brandon Adams died late Saturday night at the age of 21. According to a statement from Atlanta police, citing information provided by Georgia Tech police, Adams collapsed at a home near campus and was taken by friends to Emory University Hospital Midtown, where he was later pronounced dead. The GBI Medical Examiner’s Office will conduct an autopsy beginning Monday morning to determine the cause of death. Adams, from Brentwood, Tenn., was set to begin spring practice with the Yellow Jackets on Tuesday in preparation for his senior season. (As of Sunday evening, the team’s plan was to continue with spring practice, the first of coach Geoff Collins’ tenure, as scheduled.) » More: Teammates, coaches mourn Adams on social media “We lost an unbelievable kid,” former Yellow Jackets assistant coach Andy McCollum said. “I can’t even put it into words.” Adams was expected to play a significant role on the team this fall. He played in 33 games over three seasons and had his best season in 2018, with 24 tackles, five tackles for loss and two forced fumbles. He was a business administration major. The death of the young man who weighed in at 325 pounds and answered to “Big B” will be felt this fall in Jackets’ box scores – he was a likely starter with clear NFL potential – but far more so in aching hearts. From a tweet from a former teammate, Desmond Branch: “One of the best, genuine, loving and overall happy people I have ever met. Always had a smile on his face, got along with everyone.” From a statement from Collins: “Our entire Georgia Tech football family is heartbroken by the news of Brandon’s passing. In the short time that I have had the privilege and honor of knowing Brandon, I admired and respected him, first and foremost as a terrific human being, but also as an outstanding teammate and leader.” “He always wanted to hug you,” said Kyle Cerge-Henderson, who played on the defensive line with Adams for the past three seasons. “Everybody in the Georgia Tech athletic department can tell you that Brandon Adams gave the greatest hugs of all-time.” Cerge-Henderson and his wife gave birth to a baby girl in February 2017. Shortly after Ava’s birth, Cerge-Henderson got a call from his friend. Adams wanted to know if he could bring her some cheese puffs. From there on out, Cerge-Henderson said, he occasionally continued the distinctive gift-giving practice. “At her birthday party, he brought her a bunny — because I told her she loved stuffed animals — and a big bag of cheese puffs,” Cerge-Henderson said. Former coach Paul Johnson said that, whenever Adams was in the football offices, he went out of his way to stop by his office to see how he was doing, and did likewise with Johnson’s wife Susan on road trips. He last saw Adams when Johnson was recently at Tech getting treatment for his back. “He just saw me on the table and he came over, ‘Coach, man, how are you doing? You playing golf? You getting a lot of golf in?’ ” Johnson recalled. Johnson in turn asked about Adams’ weight — often a challenge — “and he said, ‘Man, I’m getting it.’ I said, ‘Good, I’m anxious to watch you play this fall.’ He was just always smiling.” McCollum recruited Adams out of Brentwood Academy, where he was a three-sport star. While no longer at Tech, McCollum said that he’d recently received a text message from Adams telling him he loved and missed him. “He was just like a lightbulb in the room,” McCollum said. “When he walked in, the whole room lights up. Biggest heart of any kid I’ve ever been around.” Jackets players and coaches had a chance to share their grief Sunday night as they gathered for a previously scheduled team meeting upon their return to campus from spring break.  Adams is survived by his mother, Lisa Greer, his stepfather, Reginald Woods, and sister, Rian. Memorial information was not available as of Sunday evening. More informal memorials are already scheduled. Cerge-Henderon said that he and his wife will give their daughter cheese puffs for every birthday going forward to remember Adams. Johnson will remember a young man quick with a fist bump and a big smile who liked to dabble on the piano when the coach had team members over to his home. “I think he was very talented, not just in football,” Johnson said. “He was very talented. Smart kid with a great personality. He was going to be very successful, I think, no matter what he did, whether it was in football or off the field in a career. Whatever he did, I think he had a chance to be special. He was a special kid.”
  • Georgia freshman cornerback Tyrique Stevenson was arrested early Sunday morning on charges of disorderly conduct, according to the Athens-Clarke County jail booking recap. The Athens Clark County police department arrested Stevenson at 2:42 a.m. Sunday morning on the misdemeanor charge and he was released at 3:26 a.m. after posting a $1,000 bond. Stevenson is a 5-star recruit from Homestead, Fla., who attended Miami Southridge High School before enrolling in January at Georgia. Stevenson is the third Georgia football player who has been arrested in the last month. Bulldogs reserve linebacker Jaden Hunter was arrested last Wednesday by UGA police for illegally stopping, standing or parking a vehicle and driving with a suspended/revoked license. Latavious Brini was arrested and charged with simple battery after allegedly slapping a man out an Athens bar on Feb. 28. Smart has yet to issue a statement on Stevenson.
  • Georgia State is going dancing for the fifth time in program history after defeating UT-Arlington, 73-64, Sunday in the Sun Belt Conference tournament championship game. It’s the first time the Panthers have repeated as Sun Belt tournament champions. With the win Georgia State clinched an automatic bid to the NCAA tournament. The Panthers are the No. 14 seed in the Midwest, facing third-seeded Houston at 7:20 p.m. Friday in Tulsa, Okla. The last time Georgia State was a 14th seed was in 2015, when R.J. Hunter hit a 30-foot 3-pointer with 2.6 seconds to play to stun No. 3-seed Baylor.  On Sunday, Georgia State was down eight points early in the first half, but a strong offensive spurt and solid free throw shooting helped them climb back. The Panthers tied the game at 17, but UTA stretched its lead to six with back-to-back 3s. Then Georgia State went on a 9-0 run after senior forward Jeff Thomas was fouled on a 3-point shot, making all three free throws, and sophomore guard Kane Williams converted a four-point play on the next possession. The run gave Georgia State the lead, and they never looked back. “It was big,” said Williams, who was named to the all-tournament team. “I think it was a momentum swinger, and after that I feel like we got the tide rolling.” Georgia State led 36-31 at halftime and shot 11-of-11 at the free throw line in the first half despite shooting 66 percent on the season. Much like Saturday’s win over Texas State, defense proved to be the key again for the Panthers. Georgia State held UTA scoreless for six and a half minutes of game time from the end of the first half and five minutes into the second half. In that time the Panthers pushed their lead from one to 12 before a 7-0 run by UTA cut the score to 43-38. UTA pulled within five multiple times in the second half, but they failed to come any closer than that for most of the half. Senior guard Devin Mitchell played a big part in maintaining the lead. He came off the bench in the second half and scored eight consecutive points for the Panthers. Senior forward Malik Benlevi followed Mitchell up with an 8-point run of his own as Georgia State seized control of the game leading, 64-52. UTA made it a game coming out of a timeout. The Mavericks had easy fastbreak layups and went on an 8-0 run, cutting Georgia State’s lead to 64-60 with less than two minutes to play. Junior guard Damon Wilson broke up the run with two free throws, and Williams extended the lead back to eight with another two free throws. UTA missed multiple 3s in an attempt to come back, and with 56 seconds left, junior guard D’Marcus Simonds converted a free throw to make it a 10-point game. “We weren’t the greatest free throw shooting, and I couldn’t understand it because we shoot the ball so well,” said Georgia State coach Ron Hunter. “But we have been great at the end of the game with five minutes left. With five minutes left in the game we’ve been tremendous free throw shooters. “I knew when we get it inside five we were pretty locked in at that particular time, and that’s when you have to make them.” Benlevi iced the game with two more free throws before Hunter pulled his starters to a round of applause by the Georgia State faithful who made their way to New Orleans. Benlevi finished the game with 16 points and 11 rebounds and was named the tournament’s most outstanding player after recording double-doubles in both games.
  • Georgia State’s defense smothered Texas State in a 59-46 win in the semifinals of the Sun Belt Conference tournament Saturday. Georgia State opened by forcing a shot-clock violation on the first possession and didn’t allow a basket until the 16:38 mark. The Panthers held Texas State to 1-of-12 from the field until its next field goal with 6:47 left in the first half. For most of the first half Georgia State struggled on offense. Junior guard D’Marcus Simonds was not his usual self, shooting 1-of-6 from the field and received a technical foul. Senior forward Malik Benlevi picked up the slack along with senior forward Jeff Thomas, who made two 3-point shots in the first half.  Benlevi’s second 3-pointer of the game started a 16-4 run, stretching the Georgia State lead from three to 15, at 28-13. Benlevi said Texas State was hedging the ball-handler on pick-and-rolls, and it left him open on the perimeter after he set screens. He burned Texas State, making 3 of 8 from beyond the 3-point line and scoring a game-high 15 points. Benlevi had ten rebounds and finished with his third double-double of the season. By the end of the half, Georgia State led 28-15 and forced 14 turnovers. The second half opened much the same. Eric Terry scored a quick basket for Texas State, but then Georgia State’s defense clamped down and held Texas State scoreless for the next five minutes of game time. Georgia State’s offensive approach switched from the perimeter to attacking the rim and getting the ball inside. After scoring only four points in the paint, Georgia State scored 12 in the paint and attempted 20 free throws in the second half. Simonds was a big benefactor of the offensive shift. He was able to get to the free-throw line six times, converting all six, and ended the game with 11 points, seven rebounds and five assists. Texas State was able to get its offense going with two 3-pointers by Mason Harrell, who scored all 10 of his points in the second half. However, it was too little too late, and the Bobcats couldn’t get themselves out of the early hole. Texas State’s leading scorer Nijal Pearson was held scoreless and was 0-of-10 from the field. On the night, Texas State shot 13-of-61 (21.3 percent) from the field and committed 18 turnovers. The 46 points were a season-low for the Bobcats. Georgia State coach Ron Hunter said he and his team took the game personally. The Panthers thought they weren’t given the proper respect by either the media or other coaches in the league, and they played like they had something to prove. “They’ve got swag because we won the league and (Benlevi and Thomas) aren’t all-conference players,” Hunter said. “We don’t have anybody on all-conference but one guy. That’s why these guys have swag – we have something to prove. “As I told them, we don’t care about individual awards. All we care is who goes to the NCAA tournament and brings those banners home. That’s the swag we carry.” With the win Georgia State has a chance to repeat as Sun Belt tournament champions and win its third championship in five years. They also inched closer to clinching an automatic bid in the NCAA tournament. The Panthers will play the winner of UT-Arlington and Georgia Southern at 2 p.m. Sunday. The NCAA bracket will be released at 6 p.m. Sunday. 
  • Georgia Tech women’s basketball coach MaChelle Joseph has been placed on leave, the school said Wednesday. A statement from the athletic department characterized the leave as “a pending personnel matter” and also said that the school would have no further comment. Joseph did not respond to a message seeking comment. Joseph is in her 16th season at Tech and has had the longest and most successful tenure of any coach in team history. She has led the Yellow Jackets to seven NCAA tournament berths, although Tech has not made the NCAA field in the past four seasons. In Joseph’s place, assistant coach Mark Simons will serve as acting head coach. The team will play next at Miami on Thursday. The Jackets are 17-10 overall and 7-7 in the ACC and trying to earn an NCAA tournament berth. Starting in Joseph’s fourth season, 2006-07, the Jackets made the NCAA tournament field for six consecutive seasons. The run culminated in their first Sweet 16 appearance, at the end of the 2011-12 season. However, Tech has made one NCAA tournament in the six seasons after that. Tech’s 2018 signing class, though, was rated as high as seventh nationally, and freshmen Elizabeth Dixon and Elizabeth Balogun have been integral to the team’s performance this season.
  • Georgia Tech has announced a news conference for Tuesday at Mercedes-Benz Stadium, with officials from the AMB Group (the parent company of the stadium and the Falcons) and the Peach Bowl to be present. It’s expected that it will be an announcement for the Yellow Jackets to play a handful of future home games there. The presence of Peach Bowl CEO Gary Stokan at the news conference suggests his organization’s involvement as well. Holding marquee games in the $1.6 billion sports temple likely would help Tech’s bottom line and perhaps draw attention to coach Geoff Collins’ team while also providing the stadium with additional events. While the 2019 schedule is set, Tech does play Clemson and Notre Dame in 2020 (the latter scheduled for Nov. 14). As a potential organizer, the Peach Bowl could generate money for charities and scholarships. As a result of its coaching transition, Tech’s athletic department finds itself in a financial pinch and perhaps more interested than usual in moving home games out of Bobby Dodd Stadium for the right price. The change from Paul Johnson to Collins cost about $6 million, and the athletic department was already anticipating running a deficit of $2.8 million for the 2020 fiscal year. The changeover will deplete the department’s reserve fund, which stood at about $6.65 million at the start of the fiscal year in July. The athletic department projects to have the reserve fund restored to $5 million by fiscal year 2023. Without money in the reserve fund, “it just doesn’t give you that cushion that you would like to have,” Tech athletic director Todd Stansbury said in January. “All of the sudden, you don’t have much of a rainy-day fund. And that’s what the fund balance is for, for unforeseen circumstances — transitioning a football staff, something like that.” Either through a guarantee or receiving gate receipts, Tech would stand to draw revenues at Mercedes-Benz Stadium (capacity: 71,000) greater than what it would receive playing at Bobby Dodd Stadium (55,000). For the 2017 season opener against Tennessee in Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Tech received $2.85 million from the Peach Bowl.  Moving to a larger stadium, however, invites the potential for more fans of Clemson or Notre Dame (or another opponent) to be cheering for the opposition at a Tech home game. Tech home sellouts typically have a noticeable percentage of visiting fans.
  • Eight Ole Miss men's basketball players knelt during the national anthem Saturday afternoon in response to a Confederacy rally near the arena. Minutes before the Rebels’ game against Georgia, both teams formed lines for the anthem. As soon as 'The Star-Spangled Banner' began, six players from the Rebels took a knee and bowed. Toward the end of the anthem, two teammates joined them. The Confederacy demonstration was led by out-of-state protesters a few hundred feet from the arena. In the aftermath of violence at a similar rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2017, the Oxford community has been on alert. Various student groups held counter-protests on campus Thursday and Friday. On Saturday, one began on the city square and ended at the Confederate monument in the heart of the Ole Miss campus.
  • ATHENS — While Georgia football doesn’t benefit immediately from Jalen Hurts’ decision to transfer from Alabama to Oklahoma, it only serves to help the Bulldogs in the long run. Hurts, as a graduate transfer, was eligible to play immediately anywhere he chose to go. Here are three ways Georgia benefits from is decision to play for the Sooners: RELATED: Chris Fowler explain’s ‘Pandora’s box’ of CFB transfer world 1. Hurts won’t be starting for a UGA scheduled opponent There’s no question Hurts was a much-coveted player during this offseason, offering leadership and championship game experience. Adding a player and a leader like Hurts might have been enough to get some programs over the hump. Tennessee, most notably, would have been a prime landing spot for Hurts. Vols coach Jeremy Pruitt   was said to have a good relationship with Hurts in Tuscaloosa. Tennessee isn’t on the Bulldogs’ level quite yet from a talent standpoint, but AD Phillip Fulmer has beefed up the Vols’ coaching staff and Hurts would have provided another immediate lift. RELATED: Vols fork out nearly $5 million for Georgia OC Jim Chaney  2. Alabama football weakens in 2019 with Hurts transfer There was a chance Hurts was going to decide to stay in Tuscaloosa and complete his legacy as a Tide legend. UGA fans can breathe a sigh of relief he chose another route. There’s no guarantee Alabama will reach the SEC Championship Game to face Georgia again, but it would be hard to bet against that happening. As big of an issue as it was for Georgia OLB D’Andre Walker to leave the SEC title game with the Bulldogs up 28-21, it still took a special performance from Hurts to exploit the loss of UGA’s sacks leader. Alabama, like Georgia, is stockpiled with talent. But it’s hard to imagine the Tide — or any other program this season — having a 1-2 punch like Hurts and Tagovailoa have proven to be the past two years. Indeed, Alabama’s QB depth was the only thing that stood between the Bulldogs and the 2017 College Football Playoff Championship as well as the 2018 SEC championship and a spot in the CFB Playoffs. 3. Georgia out of QB transfer spotlight for now The Justin Fields’ transfer story probably isn’t finished playing out in the national media yet — there’s still a controversial appeal for immediate eligibility to be filed (and likely won). But Hurts’ transfer talk will boost Oklahoma into the national transfer spotlight as it deals with the fallout of adding another player to its roster, one action triggering another. New College Football transfer destinations: -Brandon Wimbush: UCF -Tate Martell: Miami -Jalen Hurts: Oklahoma -Urban Meyer: Retirement* -SEC fans: Clemson -Florida State fans: 2013 -Alabama fans: 1st grade math * = “Retirement” is short for “USC, when the job comes open” — NOTSportsCenter (@NOTSportsCenter) January 16, 2019 Already, we’ve seen controversy at Ohio State where incumbent Tate Martell has announced his intention to transfer, and now Martell’s grounds for immediate eligibility will be scrutinized and measured against those in other programs. Georgia’s quarterback situation is suddenly quiet — still competitive, but in a more comfortable manner. Jake Fromm is the clear No. 1, and incoming No. 2 Dwan Mathis is eager to learn from Fromm to become the most prepared back-up quarterback he can be heading into the 2019 season. Georgia coach Kirby Smart also has the luxury of having depth at the position in 2019. The Bulldogs added former UGA walk-on and junior college transfer Stetson Bennett for peace of mind. Part of the issue with the Fromm-Fields situation last season was the Bulldogs had no other scholarship quarterbacks.           The post 3 ways Jalen Hurts’ transfer to Oklahoma helps Georgia football appeared first on DawgNation.