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    Four months after the opening race was called off at the last minute, the Formula One season finally gets underway this weekend on another continent and in a different-looking world. There will be no fans on hand at the remote Spielberg track in Austria, with the coronavirus still creating uncertainty over how many races can actually be held — and where. That may not be the only unusual sight, as drivers are discussing whether to take the knee together on the grid before Sunday’s race in support of the Black Lives Matter movement. Defending F1 champion Lewis Hamilton has been an outspoken supporter of the movement and will be competing in an all-black Mercedes car — instead of the usual silver — as a statement against racism. “It is so important that we seize this moment,” said Hamilton, the only Black driver to become F1 champion. The truncated campaign kicks off with back-to-back races in Austria, as part of a hastily reworked schedule. It was meant to start nearly 10,000 miles (16,000 kilometers) away in the Australian city of Melbourne. But the fast-spreading impact of the coronavirus pandemic led to the Australian GP being canceled on March 13, two days before the scheduled race, while people were still queuing for the first practice sessions. Several other races, including the showcase Monaco GP, were also canceled. A rescue package with eight European races squeezed into 10 weeks, culminating with the Italian GP on Sept. 6, was scrambled together. F1 still hopes to rearrange some of the postponed races in order to finish the season with 15-18 of the scheduled 22. There will also be two consecutive races at the British GP. If the season continues beyond Europe, it will end with races in Bahrain and Abu Dhabi in December. “We actually don’t even know the amount of races we are going to do,' McLaren and future Ferrari driver Carlos Sainz Jr. said. “It’s an unprecedented scenario.” Spielberg's Red Bull Ring, cut off from major towns or cities, offers a reassuringly secluded feel amid coronavirus fears. But strict health and safety measures have been put into place. Everyone entering the track, including a greatly reduced number of media representatives, must have tested negative for Covid-19 and further tests will be carried out every five days. F1 teams are not allowed to mingle with each other — on or off the track — and media have no access to F1's paddock area. Drivers would normally have faced a barrage of questions in a news conference room, but health requirements dictate that drivers hold news conferences via video link and with questions sent in advance. And, of course, Spielberg's 4.3-kilometer (2.7-mile) circuit will be largely empty. It is normally swarming with tents, camper vans, makeshift barbecues and tens of thousands of orange-shirted Max Verstappen fans. The Red Bull driver, hugely popular back home in the Netherlands, has won the past two races here. The track is among the shortest in F1 but also one of the most aggressive. Drivers spend about 72% of the time at full throttle, second only to Italy's Monza track with 77%. That's perfectly suited to Verstappen's bold and abrasive racing style. Last season he chased down the leading trio before making a typically brazen overtaking move on race leader Charles Leclerc's Ferrari. The 22-year-old Verstappen showed last season that he is closing the gap to Hamilton in terms of wheel-to-wheel driving. Red Bull's car also made a considerable jump in speed, while Ferrari's faded, and Verstappen is emerging as a major title threat to Hamilton. The 35-year-old British driver is chasing a record-equaling seventh F1 title to equal Michael Schumacher's record, and only needs to win eight more races to beat Schumacher's mark of 91. Aside from Verstappen and possibly Valtteri Bottas — Hamilton's improving teammate at Mercedes — the other main challenger is Leclerc. The 22-year-old Monaco driver is extremely quick and impressed observers in his first season at Ferrari with seven pole positions — two more than Hamilton — and two wins. He is now Ferrari's No. 1 ahead of four-time F1 champion Sebastian Vettel, whose star has faded after he wasted mid-season leads in 2017 and 2018 and lost those titles to Hamilton. The German veteran is leaving at the end of the year after failing to agree on a new contract, and his future in F1 is uncertain. Like so many other things this season. ___ More AP auto racing: https://apnews.com/apf-AutoRacing and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • A Missouri man was freed from prison Wednesday after a county prosecutor declined to retry his case, punctuating years of work by WNBA star Maya Moore and other supporters who argued he was falsely convicted of burglary and assault charges. Moore was on hand when Jonathan Irons, 40, walked out of the Jefferson City Correctional Center. She clapped as Irons approached a group of people waiting for his release. She then dropped to her knees at one point before joining a group hug around Irons. He had been serving a 50-year prison sentence stemming from the non-fatal shooting of a homeowner in the St. Louis area when Irons was 16. But a judge threw out his convictions in March, citing a series of problems with the case, including a fingerprint report that had not been turned over to Irons’ defense team, according to The New York Times. The Missouri attorney general’s office unsuccessfully appealed the judge's decision, and the lead prosecutor in St. Charles County decided against a retrial. Moore and Irons became friends after meeting through prison ministry, according to the Times. The 31-year-old Moore, a Jefferson City, Missouri, native who starred at UConn before helping lead Minnesota to four WNBA titles, put her career on hold last season to help Irons. Moore said in January she planned to sit out a second season and miss the Tokyo Olympics. After Irons' convictions were thrown out in March, she told the AP her plans hadn't changed. “’My decision to take another year was bigger than this case,” she said at the time. “But obviously this case was in the forefront of my mind. I’m looking forward when this is done to finally getting some rest and time with my family.” ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • The baseball organization that presents the annual MVP awards will consider whether the name of former commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis should be pulled from future plaques. “The issue is being addressed,” Jack O’Connell, longtime secretary-treasurer of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America, said Wednesday. “It will definitely be put up for discussion.” Former NL Most Valuable Players Barry Larkin, Mike Schmidt and Terry Pendleton this week told The Associated Press they would favor removing Landis’ name because of concerns over his handling of Black players. “I could not agree more,” decorated writer and broadcaster Peter Gammons tweeted. Meanwhile, a lively debate has popped up on social media about whose name should be on the plaque, if anyone at all. Among those being suggested are Hall of Famer Frank Robinson, the only player to win the MVP in both leagues, Negro Leagues star Josh Gibson and Brooklyn Dodgers owner Branch Rickey, who signed Jackie Robinson. Landis was hired in 1920 as MLB’s first commissioner. No Blacks played in the majors during his tenure that ended with his death in late 1944 — Robinson broke the color barrier in 1947 and Larry Doby followed later that season. Landis’ legacy is “always a complicated story” that includes “documented racism,” official MLB historian John Thorn said. Every AL and NL MVP plaque since Landis’ death has carried his name -- in letters twice as big as the winner -- and an imprint of his face. Landis gave the BBWAA control of picking and presenting the MVPs in 1931. “We are trying to work out the mechanics of dealing with the topic amid a pandemic,” O’Connell said. “It will just be a matter of what form.” “It is safe to say that we would prefer to settle this matter before the Winter Meetings,” he said. The BBWAA’s next scheduled meeting is at the winter meetings in Dallas in December. The MVP winners are usually announced in November. Landis’ name has been on the plaques for 75 years, but it is not pledged to remain there under the BBWAA constitution. A vote by the membership could lead to a redesign by the end of the coronavirus-delayed, 60-game season set to start in three weeks. “I don’t know that it needs a name,” Larkin said. “MVP says it all.” ___ More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Cameron Champ was added to the field in the Rocket Mortgage Classic in Detroit under a modified PGA Tour policy that allows players who test positive for the coronavirus to be eligible if they had no symptoms and get two negative test results at least 24 hours apart. The decision Wednesday was the latest change to an evolving “Health and Safety Plan” as the tour enters its fourth week back from the COVID-19 shutdown. Champ is among six players and two caddies on the PGA Tour who have tested positive. Ricky Elliott, the caddie for Brooks Koepka, tested positive before the Travelers Championship last week in Connecticut, and then had a negative test. The tour said after several asymptomatic positive tests that were followed by a negative test, it consulted with the CDC and is moving to a test-based model, which allows players or caddies to return if they have two negative tests at least 24 hours apart. Previously, the tour relied on time-based protocols that required those who test positive to self-isolate for at least 10 days. Champ tested positive on June 23 and withdrew from the Travelers Championship. The tour said he had three negative tests over the 72 hours. He still had to be tested at Detroit Golf Club upon arrival. Champ was set to tee off as a single at 2:10 p.m. Thursday on the 10th tee. “Today’s changes -- and those announced over the past week -- illustrate our commitment to preserving the health and well-being of our athletes, constituents and our impact on the communities in which we play, as well as a willingness to make medically sound adjustments that allow our players to compete, safely,” PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan said in a statement. “The continued success of our return to golf depends on that approach.” Harris English and Chad Campbell tested positive when they arrived in Detroit for the Rocket Mortgage Classic, while Brandon Wu and Jonathan Hodge had positive tests in Colorado on the Korn Ferry Tour. The tour said all were asymptomatic. They would be eligible to play next week if they have two negative tests at least 24 hours apart. The tour made two other adjustments to its policy. Players who are coming off a break must take a home test for the coronavirus if they want to be eligible for a stipend to cover their costs if they test positive. The stipend -- reported to be worth up to $100,000 for PGA Tour players -- will be the same amount for a positive test returned at home or a tournament site. That makes eight changes to the evolving policy since the tour resumed its schedule June 8 at Colonial in Fort Worth, Texas. Other changes include players being tested before taking a charter to the next flight and when they arrive at the next event; players not receiving a stipend for a positive test if they don’t follow safety protocols; and players or caddies being banned from the golf course until their tests results are back. — More AP golf: https://apnews.com/apf-Golf and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • The NFL will cut its preseason in half and push back the start of exhibition play so teams have more time to train following a virtual offseason made necessary by the coronavirus pandemic, a person with knowledge of the decision told The Associated Press. The person spoke Wednesday on condition of anonymity because the league hasn’t announced that the preseason will be cut from four games to two. Players are still discussing with their union whether to ask for cancellation of all preseason games, according to two people familiar with their thinking. Both people spoke on condition of anonymity because a decision hasn't been made. The pandemic forced teams to conduct their entire offseason programs via videoconference. So, teams will be gathering together for the first time when training camps open July 28. Minus the usual minicamps, on-field practices and in-person weight training from April to June, players’ conditioning won’t be what it normally is. So, eliminating the first week of preseason games Aug. 13-16 will give them more time to ratchet up their football fitness. Teams will now play exhibitions Aug. 20-24 and Aug. 27-31 during what were originally the second and third weeks of exhibition play, with all 32 teams playing one home and one road game. Most of those games will remain the same as originally scheduled, although some matchups in that second slate will have to be changed so every team gets a game at home. The exhibition finales on Sept. 3 were also scrapped, giving teams more time to get ready for the regular season, which opens Sept. 10 with Houston at Kansas City. There are no changes to the regular season schedule. The league continues to draw up protocols, not only for COVID-19 mitigation but for ramping up practices during the first few weeks of training camp. The annual Hall of Fame Game pitting Pittsburgh and Dallas on Aug. 6 was recently scrapped as the induction ceremonies were pushed back to 2021. ___ AP Pro Football Writer Rob Maaddi contributed to this report. ___ Follow Arnie Melendrez Stapleton on Twitter: http://twitter.com/arniestapleton ___ More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • The 2020 NBA champion, if one is crowned, will have emerged as the ultimate winner from a season that lasted more than a full year from start to finish. A season that saw political unrest between the NBA and China, the deaths of David Stern and Kobe Bryant,racial issues across the nation and, if that wasn’t enough, a pandemic. It is a season like none other. So, an asterisk-bearing champion? Not a chance. To the teams in the NBA, this championship might be the toughest one ever claimed. It’ll come after more than three months of living in a quasi-bubble at the Disney complex near Orlando, Florida, after an entire postseason is played without fans, with most if not all that time spent away from friends and family. And only one of the 22 teams headed to Disney will be able to say it was absolutely worth the trouble. “I’ve heard a lot of people say that there’s going to be, like, a star next to this championship,” Milwaukee forward and reigning NBA MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo said. “I feel like at the end of the day this is going to be like the toughest championship you could ever win because the circumstances are really, really tough right now. So, whoever wants it more is going to be able to go out there and take it.” He’s not alone in feeling that way. Most of the 22 teams that will be headed to the Disney campus next week — the first arrivals are scheduled for July 7 — spent Wednesday beginning Phase 3 of the NBA’s restart process. Workouts are still individual, but now mandatory. No team can practice or play 5-on-5 until arriving at Disney. Teams won’t be back together, all at once, in person, until getting to Central Florida. “I think this might be certainly the most worthy of all world championships in the NBA because of all the things that every team is going to have to navigate and overcome to be able to be crowned a champion,' Miami coach Erik Spoelstra said. The season has been daunting and won’t get any easier. That’s why Los Angeles Lakers coach Frank Vogel — whose team was in China when the political issues hit this fall, took the enormous emotional blow that followed Bryant’s death, has championed societal change during these troubled times in the country and has had players infected with the coronavirus — wholeheartedly agrees with Antetokounmpo’s stance. “Our team has been through a lot this year,” Vogel said. “And we’ve endured, and we’ve come out strong each time we’ve faced adversity. I don’t know about other teams but if we were able to come through all of this and achieve the ultimate prize, I do think it deserves a harder-than-ordinary asterisk. If you’re going to put an asterisk on it, I don’t think it weakens it at all.” There are elements of the restart that are not easy for anyone involved, such as the isolation from the outside world, the daily testing, and the highly restrictive rules that the NBA put in place after consultation with health officials. Denver coach Michael Malone said that will prove someone’s championship mettle. “If you’re able to go into a bubble to be isolated from your friends and family, to have no home court advantage, to have a league interruption of four months, and you’re able to spend 90 days and come out of there a champion, I think this will be the toughest championship ever won,” Malone said. “There’s no asterisk. You win an NBA championship anytime, it’s a hell of an accomplishment. But in these circumstances, these unprecedented times, with everything going on ... I think it will be a remarkable accomplishment.” Some may argue otherwise, but the 1999 championship by San Antonio after a 50-game regular season and the 2012 championship by Miami after a 66-game season — both shortened because of labor strife in the league — come with no formal asterisk attached. This NBA season will see the 22 remaining teams all play between 71 and 75 games before the playoffs, and the league’s plan is for a full four-round, best-of-seven-throughout postseason. No one is being gifted a title this season. “I saw (Houston guard) Austin Rivers said today, you know that the idea of an asterisk next to this championship, I think he said it exactly right,” Boston coach Brad Stevens said Wednesday. “This is going to be a super unique situation and whoever wins it is going to really earn it.” Los Angeles Clippers coach Doc Rivers — Austin’s father — relayed a recent conversation he had with NBA Commissioner Adam Silver, who said if anything, the team that wins this title merits more than an asterisk. “He said the team that wins this will deserve a gold star, not an asterisk,” Rivers said. “If you think about the mental toughness it’s going to take ... it’s going to come down to talent. It’s going to come down to teams trying to get back together and play together. There’s going to be so many things that are thrown at us that we don’t even know yet. It’s really going to be a mental toughness challenge.” ___ AP Sports Writer Steve Megargee in Milwaukee contributed. ___ More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Webb Simpson is competing on the PGA Tour again after his family had a coronavirus scare. One of Simpson’s daughters tested positive for COVID-19, leading to him withdrawing from last week’s tournament as a precaution. “The first test was positive, but (she) got tested again by the more accurate tests, along with my other four kids and my wife, and everyone was negative,' Simpson said Wednesday, a day before the first round of the Rocket Mortgage Classic. “So we felt confident that she never had it.' Simpson, who leads the tour in FedEx Cup points and scoring average, is attempting to become the PGA Tour's first player with three victories during this pandemic-interrupted year. Most importantly, the No. 6 player in the world is trying to stay healthy. And Simpson does not believe that doing his job is putting him or his family at risk. “I mentioned to the commissioner last week that based on our numbers, our stats, I told him the safest place anyone can be in the United States right now is on the PGA Tour,' Simpson said. “We had at that point, I think seven out of 2,300, 2,400 positive, which is amazing. ... But I do think the elephant in the room and the tough thing that they’re dealing with every week is these positives.' Chad Campbell withdrew from the Rocket Mortage Classic on Tuesday after becoming the sixth player to test positive for the coronavirus as the PGA Tour entered a fourth week of its restart. The tour policy requires self-isolation for at least 10 days. Earlier this week, Harris English tested positive and also withdrew from the tournament. “Guys are so aware of how easy it is to catch this disease that I think everyone else is becoming more strict,' Simpson said. “That first week at Colonial there were still fist bumps after the round, closer contact I think on the range or player dining. There’s way less of that now. “Now, nobody’s touching. Maybe an elbow here or there. I’m definitely seeing how it’s affecting everyone, not just those who have had contact with someone.' While the PGA Tour has resumed play, the pandemic is keeping the fans away. That will take away a chance for defending champion Nate Lashley to hear the roar of the crowd again in the Motor City. “It’s a little different, you know, not having fans here,' he said. Last year, Lashley went from being an anonymous player to someone fans wanted to root for during a wire-to-wire victory, his first on the PGA Tour, after they heard about how his parents and girlfriend were killed in a 2004 plane crash. Lashley won the inaugural Rocket Mortgage Classic by six shots. He will be paired Thursday with Simpson and Rickie Fowler. “Rickie and I, we decided that we’re just going to follow Nate around and whatever he hits because he shot 25 under last year,' Simpson joked. The field includes just 18 of the top 50 in the world ranking and none of the top five. In the previous three PGA Tour events, the top five competed each week. Simpson, along with Bryson DeChambeau, the only player with top-10 finishes in each of the last three tournaments, and No. 7 Patrick Reed, are among the favorites to earn the winner's share of $1.35 million. The Donald Ross-designed Detroit Golf Club is a short course by PGA Tour standards. The greens have significant slopes and multiple tiers that potentially pose a challenge if there are windy conditions. Chances are, though, the field will take full advantage of the old-school course and continue a trend in which many are going low. Over the last three weeks, there have been 56 rounds of 64 or better and 14 players have set or tied their career low scores on the PGA Tour despite coming off a three-month break. ___ More AP golf: https://apnews.com/apf-Golf and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports ___ Follow Larry Lage at https://twitter.com/LarryLage
  • An emotional Chicago Cubs pitching coach Tommy Hottovy is recovering from a severe case of COVID-19 that quarantined him for 30 days. The 38-year-old Hottovy broke down as he detailed a harrowing ordeal during a conference call on Wednesday. The Cubs resume workouts Friday for the first time since Major League Baseball shut down camps on March 12. “It's still kind of raw in the fact that we just got through it and to relive it,” said Hottovy, in his second season as the Cubs' pitching coach. “Obviously, it affected us pretty significantly for a month. I felt it was important for me to talk through what I went through because too much of what's out there is the easy stories of what people go through with this.” The former major leaguer learned he had the virus on the third day he felt ill, following a nasal test. He isolated in a spare bedroom with symptoms that got so bad he spent part of one day at the hospital. Hottovy tested negative about two weeks ago and still gets winded easily. He is grateful his wife, Andrea, and young children did not get sick. Hottovy had a relentless fever, difficulty breathing, dehydration and an increased heart rate. It was particularly bad at night, making sleep just about impossible. He got depressed, wondering if he could have done more even though he wore masks and gloves outside the house prior to becoming ill. Hottovy spent eight hours at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago on the 12th day and was prepared to stay overnight. Instead, he got sent home with a breathing apparatus. “If my story, if my journey through this, helps one person realize how severe this can get — and if that saves one life — then I want my story to be heard,' he said. 'Again, I’m sorry I’m emotional. It’s still fresh.” Hottovy coughed so much during one Zoom meeting with pitchers that manager David Ross took over for him. Hottovy kept a cooler filled with drinks in the spare room because he didn't want to risk exposing his family by going to the kitchen. He said his wife was constantly cleaning and neighbors brought supplies to sanitize the home. If he went outside, Andrea and the kids would clear the house and open the doors. Hottovy would then exit as quickly as he could, without touching anything, and he would go straight to his room when he went back inside. Hottovy thought about opting out of the season. But he has faith in the league's protocols and will be with the team at home and away. “I do still believe for society and for people, having sports and having baseball ... is important,” he said. “But at the same token, one little misstep, one little contact situation by one person, can derail an entire industry.” ___ More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Yoán Moncada has spent the past couple of months working out in what he called a “controlled and limited environment” in Florida, where the White Sox slugger could continue to get at-bats while protecting himself from the coronavirus. That's a good description of the environment that greeted him upon his return to Chicago. Players began reporting to their teams and home ballparks Wednesday in the most significant step yet as Major League Baseball presses ahead with its plan for a 60-game sprint of a season. Most players underwent a battery of health checks, not only for COVID-19 but also for any other lingering ailments from spring training, ahead of planned workouts beginning Friday and Saturday. “We were doing workouts by time, you know? You have to reserve a time. I wasn't interacting with a lot of people there,” Moncada said of his sessions in Florida. “The last couple of weeks I started lifting a little bit. I was hitting with limitations that we had during this situation. But I feel good. I'm ready to go.” Much like other clubs, the White Sox intend to split their 60-man roster into two groups, one working out in the morning and the other in the afternoon. All players will have their temperatures checked multiple times each day, observe increased social distancing and get accustomed to stringent safeguards that MLB has put into place for the season. “That's going to be different to see and feel as a team,” Moncada said. “We'll have to wait and see Friday how it goes.” The Yankees won't hold their first full-team workout until Saturday, even though manager Aaron Boone said players began intake testing Wednesday. That's when he plans to address the team for the first time — also in waves. “We’ll have to get creative with how we communicate,” said Boone, who plans to make the same speech three or four times. Faced with the prospect of playing 60 games in 66 days, time-consuming safety protocols, the responsibility to remain diligent health-wise off the field and the general anxiety of working amid a pandemic, Boone believes focus and toughness can be as important to a team this season as baserunning or bullpen management. “How do you deal with that mentally and emotionally?” Boone asked. “How you’re able to separate that out when you take the field each and every night? There’s an advantage to be had there.' After gauging workloads for pitchers during the shutdown, Boone expects his starters will be ready to face live hitters on the first day of summer camp. He plans to stay flexible on usage and may consider using a six-man rotation or openers, but nothing has been determined yet as all teams adjust to a new norm. “An injury can wipe out a season in a hurry,” Boone said, adding that he’s likely to be cautious with players early after New York placed a major league record 30 players on the injured list a total of 39 times last season. Orioles general manager Mike Elias said there had been no positive tests for COVID-19 among players and staff who were examined Wednesday, but he acknowledged that “it's going to be an ongoing process.” Elias has thus far named only 44 players of the 60 available to participate in the preseason workout. He will decide later which prospects will fill out the preseason roster in advance of a projected season-opener July 23 or July 24. And despite rising numbers of COVID-19 across the country, and a few players opting out, most players and executives have been bullish on the season taking place. They believe in protocols hammered out during lengthy negotiations between MLB and its players' association and are eager to provide fans with some much-needed diversion. “We’ve got to make sure we understand best practices in social distancing, make sure we know we are keeping ourselves not only apart from one another but also behaving in a way that’s consistent to what’s going to keep us all healthy,' Mets general manager Brodie Van Wagenen said. “Provided we can all work together to comply with these protocols and respect — as I said earlier —- respect each other and respect the rules, I’m optimistic that we can make this happen.” ___ AP Sports Writers David Ginsburg, Jake Seiner and Mike Fitzpatrick contributed to this report.
  • The St. Louis Cardinals have replaced the New York Yankees as the opponent for the Chicago White Sox in the Field of Dreams game on Aug. 13 at Dyersville, Iowa. The schedule change caused by the new coronavirus pandemic meant the White Sox no longer play the Yankees this season. The new opponent, first reported by The Des Moines Register, was confirmed to The Associated Press by a person familiar with the arrangements who spoke on condition of anonymity Wednesday because the matchup has not been announced. Major League Baseball hopes to announce its new schedule next week. Each team will play 60 games, 40 against division rivals and 20 against teams in the corresponding regional division in the other league. “We hope to have the option to play,” MLB said in a statement. “Construction is continuing and we are following all CDC and state protocols regarding recommended safety practices, including social distancing, washing hands, and temperature checks before arriving to the site.' It remains unclear whether fans would be allowed at the game, which is to be televised nationally by Fox. 'We are monitoring ongoing events and plan to remain as flexible as these circumstances demand,” MLB said. A temporary 8,000-seat stadium is nearing completion at the site, about 200 miles west of Chicago, adjacent to where the movie was filmed on a diamond in a cornfield. This would be the first major league game played in Iowa. The movie, released in 1989, starred Kevin Costner, Amy Madigan, James Earl Jones, Burt Lancaster and Ray Liotta. ___ More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports