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    According to the New Hampshire Union Leader, former Cafe Services employee Bonnie Kimball, who worked in the Mascoma Valley Regional High School lunchroom, said she let the boy take $8 worth of food on March 28 as a district manager looked on.  'I quietly said, 'Tell (your) mom you need money,'' Kimball told the Valley News.   The boy paid the tab March 29, the same day Kimball was fired. In a letter dated April 9, the food vendor said the district manager saw Kimball violate the company's 'cash handling procedures, the school's charge policy and federal regulation governing free meals,' the Valley News reported.   The incident came as Cafe Services was vying to have its contract renewed with the school district, the Union Leader reported.
  • [Don’t see the video? Click here] We open with a producer off-camera asking, “Can you give us a brief explanation of what’s going on with your voice?”  Jamie Dupree, dressed for Capitol Hill, immediately begins writing down his response on his tablet. He looks up at the camera with a smirk and simply replies, “No.”  In essence, the documentary ‘Voice of Reason’ is the story of Jamie Dupree’s return to air. But, Jamie’s story transcends radio waves.  Directed by WSB Videographer Jesse Brooks, ‘Voice of Reason’ is a story of triumph and how in Jamie’s words, despite life’s adversity, “There is no reason to give up.”  As a Cox Media Group Washington correspondent, Jamie spent more than three decades covering Capitol Hill. Nearly two years ago, his method of communication had to change.  Doctors say a rare neurological condition is making it difficult for his brain to tell his tongue what to do while speaking. Placing a pen in his mouth helps him speak. “It’s hard, but I’m working to come back hard,” Jamie tells WSB.  As it became obvious in the last year that his voice was not coming back, Jamie doubled down his efforts to find answers. And that’s when Mike Lupo at CMG’s corporate headquarters contacted a company in Scotland called CereProc.  With innovative technology, CereProc developed a special voice app that allows Jamie to use a simple text-to-speech program to generate news reports in his old voice.  ‘Voice of Reason,’ which became a labor of love for WSB’s Jesse Brooks, delves deeper into CereProc’s technology and Jamie’s emotional journey over the past few years  The documentary is peppered with moving interviews with Jamie’s colleagues, and even a few candid glimpses of Jamie with his kids.  He’s thankful to all who have wished him well. While the condition has obviously affected his job, that’s not what Jamie says hurts him the most –  “Think about not being able to talk to your kids, or your wife or your father or your friends. While my work is hard and different, life is about a lot more than that.”  Specialists at Emory University in Atlanta are trying a new treatment that will slow down the movement of Jamie’s tongue to make it easier for him to speak. In the meantime, Jamie wants everyone to know his overall health is good.  “Let’s be frank about this whole situation -- this sucks,” Jamie tells producers in ‘Voice of Reason,’ adding through misty eyes, “But there is no reason to quit.  “There is no reason to stop trying. And so I’m not going to stop trying.” >>READ MORE ON JAMIE’S 2019 REGIONAL MURROW AWARD.
  • Greetings all! I’m excited to answer some popular questions about my new show, The Power Pod.  What exactly is The Power Pod? The Power Pod is a weekly roundup show that takes a deeper, diverse dive into the current events of the week.  When does is launch? I’m happy to announce that the show will launch this Thursday, April 18th!  Where do I listen? The show will drop every Thursday and be available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, and the WSB Radio APP for the time being. You can subscribe right now to hear a promo for the show and be ready be ready for the first episode.  Who’s the crew? See below!  Jared Yamamoto is a radio personality and Lead Researcher/Producer for the fastest growing radio show in America, The Von Haessler Doctrine on News 95.5 and AM 750 WSB in Atlanta, Georgia.  He graduated from the University of West Georgia with a degree in Mass Communications, minoring in Political Science. Jared began his professional radio career in Atlanta at iHeart Radio’s 640 WGST as an Associate Producer for the Rob and Dave Show. Jared then moved to Cox Media Group’s WSB Radio in the fall of 2012 and became the Producer of Atlanta’s Evening News with Erick Erickson. While working at WSB, Jared also produced 2012 U.S. presidential candidate Herman Cain’s nationally syndicated radio show.  Jared is a mainstay at WSB and is plugged in with today’s politics, policies, and current events and is happy to share them with you. You can hear Jared daily on WSB with the entire Doctrine gang from 9-Noon in the morning and on his new podcast, The Power Pod!  'Bread and buttered' in Dallas, TX, Randi O is most known for her vibrant persona and her in-your-face personality. After leaving her home state and moving to the Peach State, she was determined to make a name for herself in Atlanta.  With a background in Broadcast Journalism, Randi focused right away on being on air. Through her matriculation in undergrad she gained firsthand experience on working for print, radio and television. Not too soon after coming to Atlanta, Randi joined Pop Life Radio and served as a radio personality on The Cool Kids Morning Show.  She later joined and produced a YouTube talk show called, “Sipping with the Girls (SWTG).” While finishing up her last year of grad school, where she received her master’s in Public Relations, she began to shoot for higher goals and envisioned having her own PR company.  Well with the help of God and her two mentors, Sasha the Diva and Charmin Lee, she made that goal a reality and started Randi O P&R. Randi O P&R is a public relations company that focuses on managing client’s brands and social presence.  She’s also the creator and talent for Black, Educated & Broke which is an Atlanta-based podcast expressing the thoughts of four millennials sharing their THOUGHTS about Le Struggle and bringing about positive change.  When Randi O isn’t tweeting, posting or tagging content, she enjoys giving back to the community, hanging out with her friends and sorority sisters, spending time with her adorable pooch Martini and throwing down in the kitchen.  Nicole Bennett is the Digital Producer for morning drive for Cox Media Group’s WSB Radio in Atlanta, Georgia.  She graduated from the University of Georgia in 2013, having majored in Mass Media Arts and minored in Communications Studies. Nicole began her professional career in journalism interning at WSB Radio, writing for online news magazine Around The Rings, and freelancing at CNN. Soon-after leaving her part-time positions elsewhere, Nicole was offered a fulltime position with WSB. Within about two years, she was promoted to the Morning Digital Producer position.  In her role, Nicole researches, reports on, and writes several stories a week that she publishes online at WSBRadio.com. She has on-air experience, and previously produced several podcast episodes for Around The Rings on international sports and just about anything related to the Olympics.  Nicole stays up-to-date on all stories related to politics, sports, pop culture, national and international news – with a self-professed (and perhaps unhealthy) focus on true crime and the royal family. You can find her work on WSBRadio.com, and of course now hear her once a week on the Power Pod.  Christina studied at the University of Tennessee (go vols!) and left Knoxville after 4 beautiful years with a degree in Journalism and Electronic Media. Upon graduation, Christina landed a job at Cox Media Group (here at WSB!) and worked in the Sales department. During her time at the White Columns, she met a lot of really cool peeps. Some of whom would stop her in the hallway to cut voice spots. She found much joy in this! A program director in the building once told her “You’re 23 but you sound like an absolute pro… we love your voice.”  Christina now works for a retail company here in Georgia as the Associate Manager for Field Sales. While Christina’s not working for a wonderful butt-shaping retail brand, you may find Christina singing Fleetwood Mac in the shower, desperately learning how to play the guitar or whipping up a delicious Mediterranean meal. Many friends tune into her weekly Snapchat update titled: Traffic Time with Tina, where you’ll find her acting a fool while driving home to and from work – HANDS FREE WE PROMISE!  Christina has a long history of entertaining. In fact, there are plenty of home videos on VHS to prove it. Music is and always has been a huge part of her life. At an early age, her parents insisted that she take voice and improv lessons along with Greek folklore dance. There also was not a school talent show that Christina Aicklen wasn’t a part of.  Without a doubt, Christina always finds her way back to a microphone one way or another! ;)  We’re looking forward to you joining The Power Pod family! If you have any questions, please reach out to me and subscribe now!  Jared Yamamoto is a Doctrinaire and Producer of The Von Haessler Doctrine radio show heard daily from 9-Noon on News 95.5 and AM 750 in Atlanta, Georgia.  Email jared.yamamoto@coxinc.com  Twitter: @jaredyamamoto  Instagram: @jaredyamamoto  Facebook: @JaredYamamotoWSB
  • October 10, 2018 5:00 PM newscast. Hurricane Michael roars ashore along the Florida panhandle and will soon threaten parts of Georgia. The six-week trial was a sensation in metro Atlanta and made national headlines: a prominent lawyer accused of murdering his wife in bizarre fashion; he claimed it was an accident. After five days of deliberation--and what seemed to be clear hints otherwise--the jury finds Tex McIver guilty of Felony Murder. WSB State Capitol Reporter Sandra Parrish covers the introduction, debate, and passage of the state's Hands-Free law, which put restrictions on cellphone use while driving--the biggest change for Georgia drivers in years. As of July 1st, it became illegal to talk on, use, or even touch your cellphone while behind the wheel--easily the biggest change for drivers here since seat belts were made mandatory. This series of reports was designed to help Georgians get ready. 1) How the law works. 2) Will people really put their phones down? 3) How to equip your car. 4) A personal story of distracted driving. 5) How your phone can betray you, if you lie to police. 6) Which cities are/aren't offering grace periods. 7) Exemptions. With the Georgia Bulldogs in the Rose Bowl for the first time in 75 years, and our news and sports staffers on scene in Pasadena, we decided to try a live and locally-produced pre-pregame special. It was a blast. Here is the first segment of our two-hour program. Two months after he covered Hurricane Michael's landfall on the Florida Panhandle, WSB's Pete Combs returns to report on residents' holiday season amid the rubble. Aired 12/18/18. On the 50th anniversary of MLK's assassination, WSB archival audio and original interviews relive one of the most significant weeks in Atlanta's history. Excellence in Innovation: Jamie Dupree 2.0
  • In mid-2016, WSB’s much respected and well-loved 30-year Washington Correspondent Jamie Dupree lost his voice after falling ill on a family vacation. His voice didn’t come back. It took a year of visits to specialists around the country to diagnose the problem—a rare neurological condition called “tongue protrusion dystonia”. No treatment has worked. While Jamie continued blogging, tweeting, and proving invaluable behind-the-scenes guidance, his absence from the air was obviously a major blow to our news coverage, particularly during the 2016 presidential campaign. A House floor mention of Jamie’s condition by Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen led to CNN, Politico, and The Washington Post picking up his story. And as it became clear that his voice wasn’t returning, our Cox Media Group tech gurus discovered a potentially-pioneering approach to getting Jamie back on the air. They sent years’ worth of his old radio reports to a software company in Scotland. Using hundreds of clips to isolate letters, syllables, and words, Jamie’s voice was essentially re-created electronically. Text-to-voice software then allows him to type his reports, run them through what we dubbed “Jamie Dupree 2.0”, then send them to us as audio.  The newsroom’s issue was how to handle Jamie’s return. We wanted to celebrate the moment without seeming exploitive, and the initial electronic voice was jarring enough that listeners would certainly realize it wasn’t real. We determined the answer was simply to cover it as a news story, blanketing it across all platforms and being as transparent as possible with our audience. Below are samples of the radio, web, and video coverage dating June 18, 2018.  News-Talk listeners are not known for being bashful with their opinions, and station management had some trepidation about the reaction to the simulated voice. But it was met with genuinely overwhelming affection and encouragement from the audience, and we feel the notably small number of questions or complaints was due partly to our use of every available platform to explain the story.  (And an update: gathering this material, we were startled to remember just how robotic the original electronic voice sounded. As you will hear in other contest entries, by the end of the year, with some tweaking, you’d never know it’s not Jamie speaking—and everybody at WSB continues to hope and pray that someday soon we’ll hear Jamie’s *real* voice on the air again). *** Radio Coverage: *** Video Coverage: *** Online Coverage: Back on the air with Jamie Dupree 2.0 Without a voice, DC reporter Jamie Dupree's work still resonates across the US My own State of the Union – still looking for voice answers
  • In mid-2016, WSB’s much respected and well-loved 30-year Washington Correspondent Jamie Dupree lost his voice after falling ill on a family vacation. His voice didn’t come back. It took a year of visits to specialists around the country to diagnose the problem—a rare neurological condition called “tongue protrusion dystonia”. No treatment has worked. While Jamie continued blogging, tweeting, and proving invaluable behind-the-scenes guidance, his absence from the air was obviously a major blow to our news coverage, particularly during the 2016 presidential campaign.  A House floor mention of Jamie’s condition by Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen led to CNN, Politico, and The Washington Post picking up his story. And as it became clear that his voice wasn’t returning, our Cox Media Group tech gurus discovered a potentially-pioneering approach to getting Jamie back on the air. They sent years’ worth of his old radio reports to a software company in Scotland. Using hundreds of clips to isolate letters, syllables, and words, Jamie’s voice was essentially re-created electronically. Text-to-voice software then allows him to type his reports, run them through what we dubbed “Jamie Dupree 2.0”, then send them to us as audio.  The newsroom’s issue was how to handle Jamie’s return. We wanted to celebrate the moment without seeming exploitive, and the initial electronic voice was jarring enough that listeners would certainly realize it wasn’t real. We determined the answer was simply to cover it as a news story, blanketing it across all platforms and being as transparent as possible with our audience. Below are samples of the radio, web, and video coverage dating June 18, 2018.  News-Talk listeners are not known for being bashful with their opinions, and station management had some trepidation about the reaction to the simulated voice. But it was met with genuinely overwhelming affection and encouragement from the audience, and we feel the notably small number of questions or complaints was due partly to our use of every available platform to explain the story.  (And an update: gathering this material, we were startled to remember just how robotic the original electronic voice sounded. As you will hear in other contest entries, by the end of the year, with some tweaking, you’d never know it’s not Jamie speaking—and everybody at WSB continues to hope and pray that someday soon we’ll hear Jamie’s *real* voice on the air again). *** Radio Coverage: *** Video Coverage: *** Online Coverage: Back on the air with Jamie Dupree 2.0 Without a voice, DC reporter Jamie Dupree's work still resonates across the US My own State of the Union – still looking for voice answers
  • In mid-2016, WSB’s much respected and well-loved 30-year Washington Correspondent Jamie Dupree lost his voice after falling ill on a family vacation. His voice didn’t come back. It took a year of visits to specialists around the country to diagnose the problem—a rare neurological condition called “tongue protrusion dystonia”. No treatment has worked. While Jamie continued blogging, tweeting, and proving invaluable behind-the-scenes guidance, his absence from the air was obviously a major blow to our news coverage, particularly during the 2016 presidential campaign.  A House floor mention of Jamie’s condition by Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen led to CNN, Politico, and The Washington Post picking up his story. And as it became clear that his voice wasn’t returning, our Cox Media Group tech gurus discovered a potentially-pioneering approach to getting Jamie back on the air. They sent years’ worth of his old radio reports to a software company in Scotland. Using hundreds of clips to isolate letters, syllables, and words, Jamie’s voice was essentially re-created electronically. Text-to-voice software then allows him to type his reports, run them through what we dubbed “Jamie Dupree 2.0”, then send them to us as audio.  The newsroom’s issue was how to handle Jamie’s return. We wanted to celebrate the moment without seeming exploitive, and the initial electronic voice was jarring enough that listeners would certainly realize it wasn’t real. We determined the answer was simply to cover it as a news story, blanketing it across all platforms and being as transparent as possible with our audience. Below are samples of the radio, web, and video coverage dating June 18, 2018.  News-Talk listeners are not known for being bashful with their opinions, and station management had some trepidation about the reaction to the simulated voice. But it was met with genuinely overwhelming affection and encouragement from the audience, and we feel the notably small number of questions or complaints was due partly to our use of every available platform to explain the story.  (And an update: gathering this material, we were startled to remember just how robotic the original electronic voice sounded. As you will hear in other contest entries, by the end of the year, with some tweaking, you’d never know it’s not Jamie speaking—and everybody at WSB continues to hope and pray that someday soon we’ll hear Jamie’s *real* voice on the air again). *** Radio Coverage: *** Video Coverage: *** Online Coverage: Back on the air with Jamie Dupree 2.0 Without a voice, DC reporter Jamie Dupree's work still resonates across the US My own State of the Union – still looking for voice answers
  • The six-week trial was a sensation in metro Atlanta and made national headlines: a prominent lawyer accused of murdering his wife in bizarre fashion; he claimed it was an accident. After five days of deliberation--and what seemed to be clear hints otherwise--the jury finds Tex McIver guilty of Felony Murder. As of July 1st, it became illegal to talk on, use, or even touch your cellphone while behind the wheel--easily the biggest change for drivers here since seat belts were made mandatory. This series of reports was designed to help Georgians get ready. 1) How the law works. 2) Will people really put their phones down? 3) How to equip your car. 4) A personal story of distracted driving. 5) How your phone can betray you, if you lie to police. 6) Which cities are/aren't offering grace periods. 7) Exemptions. Fielding nearly a dozen reporters, WSB hosts, and staff analysts, it was all hands on deck for what many called 'the most important midterm of our lifetime,” with our Georgia governor’s race making national headlines. Our coverage included contributions from our Cox sister outlets in Atlanta and Florida. Here is a representative segment, 10:00-10:30 PM, with network updates and commercial breaks deleted. On the 50th anniversary of MLK's assassination, WSB archival audio and original interviews relive one of the most significant weeks in Atlanta's history. October 10, 2018 5:00 PM newscast. Hurricane Michael roars ashore along the Florida panhandle and will soon threaten parts of Georgia. It's 7:00 AM on 'Atlanta's Morning News', as metro residents have been shaken awake by an earthquake! WSB Sports Director Jay Black covers celebrations after Atlanta United wins the MLS Cup, after only two seasons in Atlanta. With the Georgia Bulldogs in the Rose Bowl for the first time in 75 years, and our news and sports staffers on scene in Pasadena, we decided to try a live and locally-produced pre-pregame special. It was a blast. Here is the first segment of our two-hour program. BEST MULTIPLATFORM COVERAGE OF A SINGLE STORY: JAMIE DUPREE 2.0 In mid-2016, WSB’s much respected and well-loved 30-year Washington Correspondent Jamie Dupree lost his voice after falling ill on a family vacation. His voice didn’t come back. It took a year of visits to specialists around the country to diagnose the problem—a rare neurological condition called “tongue protrusion dystonia”. No treatment has worked. While Jamie continued blogging, tweeting, and proving invaluable behind-the-scenes guidance, his absence from the air was obviously a major blow to our news coverage, particularly during the 2016 presidential campaign.  A House floor mention of Jamie’s condition by Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen led to CNN, Politico, and The Washington Post picking up his story. And as it became clear that his voice wasn’t returning, our Cox Media Group tech gurus discovered a potentially-pioneering approach to getting Jamie back on the air. They sent years’ worth of his old radio reports to a software company in Scotland. Using hundreds of clips to isolate letters, syllables, and words, Jamie’s voice was essentially re-created electronically. Text-to-voice software then allows him to type his reports, run them through what we dubbed “Jamie Dupree 2.0”, then send them to us as audio.  The newsroom’s issue was how to handle Jamie’s return. We wanted to celebrate the moment without seeming exploitive, and the initial electronic voice was jarring enough that listeners would certainly realize it wasn’t real. We determined the answer was simply to cover it as a news story, blanketing it across all platforms and being as transparent as possible with our audience. Below are samples of the radio, web, and video coverage dating June 18, 2018.  News-Talk listeners are not known for being bashful with their opinions, and station management had some trepidation about the reaction to the simulated voice. But it was met with genuinely overwhelming affection and encouragement from the audience, and we feel the notably small number of questions or complaints was due partly to our use of every available platform to explain the story.  (And an update: gathering this material, we were startled to remember just how robotic the original electronic voice sounded. As you will hear in other contest entries, by the end of the year, with some tweaking, you’d never know it’s not Jamie speaking—and everybody at WSB continues to hope and pray that someday soon we’ll hear Jamie’s *real* voice on the air again). *** Radio Coverage: *** Video Coverage: *** Online Coverage: My own State of the Union – still looking for voice answers Back on the air with Jamie Dupree 2.0 Without a voice, DC reporter Jamie Dupree's work still resonates across the US *** WSB health reporter Sabrina Cupit. Award entry for Pete Combs in 'Best Reporter' category. Award entry for Veronica Waters in 'Best Reporter' category. Award entry for Michelle Wright in 'Best Reporter' category. Two months after he covered Hurricane Michael's landfall on the Florida Panhandle, WSB's Pete Combs returns to report on residents' holiday season amid the rubble. Aired 12/18/18. *** BEST WEBSITE: WSBRadio.com [Summary]
  • She even answered in the form of a question. These two are meant to be!