On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

clear-day
73°
Clear
H 91° L 68°
  • clear-day
    73°
    Current Conditions
    Clear. H 91° L 68°
  • clear-day
    91°
    Today
    Clear. H 91° L 68°
  • clear-day
    91°
    Tomorrow
    Sunny. H 91° L 64°
Listen
Pause
Error

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

World

    Spanish prosecutors called for rebellion and terrorism charges to be leveled against nine activists linked to pro-Catalan independence groups who were arrested Monday on suspicion they may have been preparing to commit violent acts, possibly with explosives. A Civil Guard police statement said the operation in Barcelona province was part of an investigation into the self-proclaimed Committees for the Defense of the Republic, a grassroots organization that favors northeastern Catalonia's independence from Spain. In the past, the group has organized street protests and blocked road and rail lines. It is known by its initials, CDR. Police said they carried out 10 raids and seized an abundance of material and substances they believe could be used to make explosives. If confirmed, it would be a considerable blow to Catalonia's mainstream independence movement, which is proud of its overwhelmingly pacific nature since it began gathering momentum in 2011. National Court prosecutors said the raids were aimed at gathering evidence to demonstrate the CDR's 'advanced preparation for terrorist acts in connection with their secessionist aims.' The police statement gave few details, saying there was a judicial secrecy blanket on the case. And police did not say when the group may have been planning the acts of violence, major protests in Catalonia are expected in the coming weeks when Spain's Supreme Court issues its verdict in the trial of 12 ex-Catalan officials and activists charged for attempting to establish an independent Catalan republic in 2017. The prosecutors said the operation was aimed at aborting expected CDR activities around the anniversary of the Oct. 1, 2017, illegal independence referendum in Catalonia and publication of the trial verdict. They said the CDR's activities could have caused 'irreparable damage given the advanced state of their preparations.' The CDR issued a statement saying the arrests and raids were a bid to 'silence' them and called for protests against what they described as Spanish state repression. In response, more than 100 people gathered in the Catalan town of Sabadell and shouted insults at police carrying out one of the raids. Spain's two main center-right parties welcomed the police operation while two Catalan pro-independence parties demanded that caretaker Interior Minister Fernando Grande Marlaska appear in parliament to explain the operation.
  • In a decision with wide-ranging political ramifications, Britain's Supreme Court plans to give its verdict Tuesday on the legality of Prime Minister Boris Johnson's five-week suspension of Parliament. Britain's highest court plans to announce the decision Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. after holding three days of testimony last week before 11 judges. The court is deciding whether Johnson acted improperly by shutting down Parliament this month for five weeks before Britain's Oct. 31 Brexit deadline, when the country is scheduled to leave the European Union. The topic has deeply divided British politicians as well as the public. The government says the decision to suspend Parliament until Oct. 14 was routine and is not subject to review by the courts. It claims that under Britain's unwritten constitution, it is a matter for politicians, not judges, to decide. The government's opponents argued that Johnson illegally shut down Parliament just weeks before the country is due to leave the 28-nation bloc for the 'improper purpose' of dodging lawmakers' scrutiny of his Brexit plans. They also accused Johnson of misleading Queen Elizabeth II, whose formal approval was needed to suspend the legislature. Johnson, an outspoken Brexit advocate who is willing to leave the EU without a deal if necessary, has been at odds with Parliament, which has passed a law requiring the government to seek an extension to the Brexit deadline if no Brexit deal is reached by Oct. 19. Johnson has said he will not seek a Brexit delay under any circumstances, but it is not clear how he will deal with the new law if no Brexit deal is reached with EU leaders. The suspension of Parliament sparked several legal challenges, to which lower courts have given contradictory rulings. England's High Court said the move was a political rather than a legal matter, but Scottish court judges ruled that Johnson acted illegally 'to avoid democratic scrutiny.
  • Two French women who pledged allegiance to the Islamic State group went on trial Monday for trying to blow up a car near Notre Dame Cathedral in 2016, in a case that authorities hope sheds light on the wave of extremism that has hit France. The trial is also highlighting the role of women in recruiting and violence by IS extremists. The Notre Dame terrorist plot fell apart after the gas canisters doused with fuel failed to explode, and no one was hurt. But the women had been recruited by one of France's most notorious jihadists, and prosecutors say the attempted explosion — in September 2016, long before the fire that ravaged the medieval cathedral this year — could have killed dozens of people in one of the French capital's most-beloved, tourist-friendly neighborhoods. The two main suspects, who face life in prison if convicted, were subdued as the trial opened in a special Paris terrorism court. Six other people are also on trial for related charges. Lawyer Thibault de Montbrial, representing French police and a terrorism victims association, described Monday's action in court as the first significant trial related to the 2015-2016 attacks in France, which deeply shook the country and hardened its security posture. He said the trial also 'puts in the forefront the role, often unknown, underestimated and sometimes even negated by some, of women in radicalization, fanaticism, and their ability to execute a terrorist act.' Ines Madani, now 22, is considered the key player. She was just a teenager when she and Ornella Gilligmann joined a channel on the social network Telegram run by French jihadist Rachid Kassim, according to court documents. Kassim was central to French recruiting efforts for IS, prosecutors say, and was believed linked to a gruesome attack on a French priest inside his Normandy church and the killing of a French police couple at home in front of their child. Kassim moved to Syria in 2015, and during the summer of 2016 he multiplied his threats against France on social networks and released a guide detailing how followers should commit attacks. Among his suggested methods were group stabbings or 'filling a vehicle with gas cylinders and spraying them with fuel.' Madani and Gilligmann tried to do just that, after sending Kassim videos pledging allegiance to IS, court documents say. On Sept. 4, 2016, they parked a Peugeot carrying six gas canisters near Notre Dame, doused them with diesel fuel and tried to set them alight. But they failed, and then fled. Police quickly found their trail. The car belonged to Madani's father, and the two women's fingerprints and DNA were found on the gas canisters. Gilligmann, who was already known to intelligence services for trying to reach Syria in 2014, was arrested two days later in southern France. Madani then tried to plot a new attack with help from Kassim and other women extremists. On Sept. 8, three of them took kitchen knives and attempted a rampage as police closed in. Madani 'acknowledges responsibility' for plotting the Notre Dame attack and is expecting a conviction, her lawyer Laurent Pasquet Marinacce told The Associated Press. The lawyer said Madani was manipulated by Kassim and is 'no longer radicalized at all. She has done a lot of self-examination.' Kassim is being tried in absentia. An international arrest warrant was issued for him, but he was believed killed by a drone strike in 2017 around the Iraqi city of Mosul. U.S. authorities confirmed his death, but no proof of death was officially reported to the French courts. ___ Masha Macpherson in Paris contributed.
  • Norwegian authorities have recorded six new cases of a mysterious and potentially fatal canine disease that has now affected at least 173 dogs across the country, killing 43 of them. Norway's Food Safety Authority says it's still investigating the cause of the disease, whose symptoms include vomiting and bloody diarrhea. The agency said Monday a conclusion on the disease is still pending and so far nearly 90 different breeds have had similar symptoms. It also has recommended that dogs should be held on a leash, avoid close contact with other animals and not be allowed to sniff areas or eat anything where other dogs might have been. As a precaution, dogs from Norway have been temporarily banned from canine shows in neighboring countries. No cases have been reported outside Norway.
  • The German government is defending a decision to have Chancellor Angela Merkel and her defense minister fly to the United States almost simultaneously on separate government planes, two days after Merkel's coalition presented a policy package aiming to combat climate change. German newspapers on Monday mocked the back-to-back departures Sunday of Merkel to New York for a U.N. climate summit and Defense Minister Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer to Washington for meetings with U.S. officials. Media reported that Kramp-Karrenbauer originally was supposed to fly out in Merkel's Airbus A340 and take a commercial flight home. Merkel spokeswoman Ulrike Demmer said the separate flights were down to 'purely organizational' reasons, stemming from the fact Merkel and Kramp-Karrenbauer were heading to separate destinations with different delegations, and the government has offset emissions since 2014.
  • Authorities say nine people have been injured in an explosion at a supermarket in southern Austria. The Austria Press Agency reported that the blast Monday at the supermarket in St. Jodok am Brenner, between Innsbruck and the Italian border, set off a fire. The local rescue service said no one sustained life-threatening injuries. The Tiroler Tageszeitung newspaper said initial reports indicate that a worker may have drilled into a gas pipe.
  • The effects of President Donald Trump's standoff with China could soon be coming to a post office near you — and higher shipping rates for some types of mail are the likely outcome. The Trump administration is threatening to pull the United States out of the 145-year-old Universal Postal Union, complaining that some postal carriers like China's aren't paying enough to have foreign shipments delivered to U.S. recipients. A showdown looms at a special UPU congress that is being held Tuesday to Thursday in Geneva. The complaint centers on the reimbursement that the U.S. Postal Service receives for providing final deliveries of bulky letters and small parcels sent from abroad — usually ones not weighing more than 2 kilograms (about 4½ pounds). Such mail can include high-value items like mobile phones, memory sticks or pharmaceuticals. For consumers, the issue has largely been overlooked. 'Whatever happens, prices to ship via the postal network ... It's going to cost more,' said Kate Muth, executive director of the International Mailers Advisory Group, which counts companies like eBay, DHL, Amazon, USPS or their affiliates as members. 'The rates are going to go up.' Companies might have to decide individually how to manage such increased rates, either by swallowing the costs or passing them on to customers. One of the few companies to chime in publicly has been eBay, whose grassroots network has warned of possible 'service disruptions and dramatically increased costs for shipping through the US Postal Service' if the United States pulls out. The administration complains that China and many other countries get to pay lower reimbursements because they're classified as developing countries, putting U.S. companies at a disadvantage. It wants postal services like USPS to set their own rates — and right away, not months from now. 'Today, manufacturers in countries as small as Cambodia and as large as China pay less to send small parcels from their countries to New York than U.S. manufacturers do to ship packages from Los Angeles to the Big Apple,' Trump trade adviser Peter Navarro wrote in the Financial Times on Sept. 11. He said other countries like Canada, Norway and Brazil are also losing money from the UPU's 'distorted system.' Navarro said the U.S. opposes one of three options being considered that would maintain limits on the amount that postal systems like the USPS can charge overseas shippers. The meeting may also be a test for a growing battle of diplomatic clout: China has been ratcheting up its presence in multilateral institutions, while the Trump administration has been largely shunning them. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and others have praised the Trump administration, which has led a multi-tiered challenge to China's rising economic might notably on trade issues, for finally stepping up to try to level an allegedly unfair playing field that has been bemoaned by several U.S. administrations. In a Sept. 16 letter to Navarro provided to The Associated Press, the chamber's chief policy officer, Neil Bradley, wrote that the Trump administration's walkout threat has put the UPU 'on the brink of accepting the most meaningful reform to inter-postal compensation arrangements in 50 years.' He wrote that the UPU reform debate 'would never have materialized' without the 'courage' of the Trump administration to contemplate withdrawal. The State Department last year formally indicated that the United States would quit the UPU, an organization it helped create, on Oct. 17 if reforms can't be agreed. The administration says the United States will start setting its own rates for reimbursement — so-called 'self-declared rates' — whether or not it stays in. Some have dubbed the withdrawal prospect 'Pexit,' short for 'Postal Exit' — a cheeky allusion to Brexit, Britain's impending departure from the European Union, which likewise carries great uncertainties. It's unclear what exactly would happen if the U.S. pulls out of the postal group. Some influencing factors include whether non-postal operators can fill the void or how soon bilateral deals between the United States and postal partners could be enacted. One thing many fear from the move: mail backlogs that start piling up. ___ Associated Press writer Tami Abdollah in Washington contributed to this report.
  • The Latest on the collapse of British tour company Thomas Cook (all times local): 1 p.m. Portugal is hoping it will see limited immediate fallout from the collapse of British tour company Thomas Cook but industry officials think the country will need more aggressive tourism marketing. Segundo Joao Fernandes, president of the Algarve Regional Tourism authority, says Thomas Cook had already reduced its operations in the popular southern region and that many holiday packages it offered in Portugal relied on flights with other airlines. Fernandes told the Expresso newspaper that only 20,000 passengers, about 0.2% of those going through the region's main airport in Faro, had bookings with Thomas Cook in 2019. Pedro Costa Ferreira, president of Portugal's Association of Travel Agencies, or APAVT, says in the long run hoteliers will need to find other travel companies and use more aggressive marketing to attract British vacationers. Portugal already fears fewer tourists due to Brexit, Britain's planned departure from the European Union. One media campaign tells British holidaymakers they are 'Brelcome' to visit and says 'Portugal will never leave you.' ___ 12:20 p.m. The German government says it is considering a request from the airline Condor, which is owned by Thomas Cook, for a bridging loan but won't say when it will decide. Economy Ministry spokesman Korbinian Wagner confirmed Monday that the government had received the application from Condor, which says it is still flying. He wouldn't specify how much money it is seeking. The news agency dpa, citing unidentified government sources, put the figure at about 200 million euros ($220 million). The British parent company Thomas Cook ceased trading earlier Monday and the future of its German subsidiaries is uncertain. The German government did provide a loan to prevent the immediate grounding of insolvent Air Berlin in 2017, but Wagner said every case is different. ___ 11:30 a.m. Tunisia's government is offering assurances that Thomas Cook clients won't be prevented from leaving the country, following British media reports that vacationers were blocked at a hotel because of a payment dispute. Tunisia's TAP news agency says the country's tourism minister, Rene Trabelsi, intervened to resolve an issue that arose with British tourists who'd been staying in a hotel in the resort city of Hammamet. The TAP report did not name the hotel, but a British vacationer told BBC radio on Sunday that the Les Orangers beach resort in Hammamet, near Tunis, demanded extra money from guests who were about to leave, for fear it wouldn't be paid what it is owed by Thomas Cook. Ryan Farmer said many tourists refused the demand, since they had already paid Thomas Cook, so security guards shut the hotel's gates and 'were not allowing anyone to leave.' Farmer said it was like 'being held hostage.' But Tunisia's Tourism Ministry, cited by TAP, denied Sunday that British tourists were sequestered at a Hammamet hotel. It said instead that 'checkout procedures were delayed for a while at the request of the hotel keeper.' It said the British group later checked out and flew home 'after being given apologies for the delay.' The ministry vowed that 'no such problem of blockage will be repeated' and said it is coordinating with hotel owners and travel agencies 'to ensure that all tourists leave Tunisia in the best conditions.' ___ 11:15 a.m. Julie Robsson and her seven friends are due to fly out of Palma de Mallorca on a chartered Titan Airways plane to Manchester following the cancellation of their Thomas Cook flight earlier in the day. The 58-year-old retiree from Yorkshire, who was ending a weeklong holiday on the island of Mallorca, was part of a group of around 300 tourists who waited on Monday for replacement flights at the main airport in Spain's Balearic Islands. Robsson said she was satisfied with the information received on the ground from the British Civil Aviation Authority and the British consulate in Palma, but that Thomas Cook's representative had not appeared in the group's hotel since the first rumors of the financial difficulties emerged last week. 'I'm quite sad because it's an old company. The prices were all reasonable. The planes were clean,' Robsson said, adding that after having used Thomas Cook's services for package holidays in Spain, Greece, Mexico and India, she was considering other alternatives now. 'I don't know which other companies I would go to,' she said. 'But one thing I know for sure is that I won't stop going on holiday because of this.' ___ 11:10 a.m. Turkey's tourism ministry says there are more than 21,000 Thomas Cook UK customers currently staying in Turkish hotels. The ministry posted on Twitter Monday that guest payments were guaranteed by the U.K.'s Air Travel Organiser's Licence, or ATOL. The statement warned there would be legal proceedings against hotels demanding payment from guests or forcing them to leave. Turkey's beaches along its western and southern coasts are popular tourist destinations. The ministry also said it would, along with Turkey's ministry of treasury and finance, launch a credit package to Turkish businesses that may be negatively affected by Thomas Cook's closure. ___ 10:55 a.m. Cyprus' deputy minister for tourism says arrangements are now underway to ferry back home the 15,000 Thomas Cook travelers now on the eastern Mediterranean island nation. Savvas Perdios said after emergency talks with tourism sector chiefs Monday that half of those clients are UK citizens, 40% hail from Scandinavian countries and the rest are from Germany. Perdios said the priority is to help people go back home. He said plans to take U.K. citizens back are already in motion but it will take some time to sort out the travel situations for others. Perdios said Thomas Cook's bankruptcy will strike a blow to the Cypriot tourism industry, as the company's clients represented 5-6% of Cyprus' annual tourist arrivals, or around 250,000 people. The company was scheduled to bring 45,000 more tourists to Cyprus until the end of the season. The deputy minister said there's a real risk that some hotels might not get paid for bookings from July, August and September. It's estimated hotel owners could lose as much as 50 million euros ($55.1 million) as a result. ___ 10:15 a.m. Spanish airport operator AENA says 46 flights have been affected by the collapse of the British tour company Thomas Cook, mostly in Spain's Balearic and Canary archipelagos. In the sun-bathed Canary Islands, a popular year-round destination in the Atlantic off the coast of Africa, up to 30,000 tourists are believed to be stranded, the head of the Las Palmas province hoteliers' federation said Monday. FEHT President José María Mañaricúa told Cadena Ser radio that hoteliers fear the economic impact of the collapse of Thomas Cook because most bookings for the high-peak winter season, one of the busiest with British tourists, had already been confirmed. The company is the second-largest tour operator in the islands, Mañaricúa said. The U.K. embassy in Madrid couldn't confirm how many of the estimated 150,000 British tourists due to be flown back to Britain would do it from Spain, but said repatriations had begun Monday from 11 airports across the southern European country. ___ 9:40 a.m. Greece's Tourism Minister says about 50,000 Thomas Cook customers are currently in Greece, and about 22,000 of them are expected to be flown home over the next three days. Haris Theocharis said more than a dozen flights are due Monday at the western islands of Zakynthos, Cephallonia and Corfu, as well as other popular Greek destinations, to start the repatriation effort. Theocharis said the company's collapse would deliver a strong blow to Greece's key tourism industry, which accounts for about a fifth of the economy. On the island of Crete, where about 20,000 people who booked holidays with Thomas Cook are currently staying, tourism officials said the company's collapse hit the local tourism industry like an earthquake. Michalis Vlatakis, head of Crete's tourist agencies' association, added that island hoteliers are now bracing for 'the following tsunami' in the form of canceled bookings stretching for months ahead. Vlatakis said about 70 percent of Cretan hotel owners had worked with Thomas Cook. ___ 9:35 a.m. The Dutch subsidiary of Thomas Cook says it is not accepting any new bookings as it looks at options to restrict the impact of the collapse of the tour company for its customers and employees. The Dutch organization says in a statement Monday that customers who have booked a holiday are covered by a nonprofit organization that protects travelers when travel companies collapse. Some 400,000 Dutch customers go on a Thomas Cook holiday each year. The company employs 200 people in the Netherlands. Britain's Civil Aviation Authority said early Monday that Thomas Cook has ceased trading. ___ 9:20 a.m. Germany's Condor airline says it can no longer carry travelers who booked with Thomas Cook companies. Condor, itself owned by Thomas Cook, said early Monday that it is still flying and is seeking a bridging loan from the German government. Thomas Cook's German branch, meanwhile, said it couldn't guarantee that tours departing Monday and Tuesday would take place and that it had stopped selling tours. It said that it is considering remaining options but, if they fail, several German Thomas Cook companies would have to apply for insolvency. News agency dpa reported that Condor then said that for legal reasons it can no longer transport passengers who booked with Thomas Cook companies. According to Thomas Cook, 140,000 people who booked with its German tour operators are currently on vacation and 21,000 were supposed to depart Monday or Tuesday. ___ 9 a.m. The Belgian branch of British tour company Thomas Cook says it continues its operations while trying to 'limit the impact' of the company's collapse. Thomas Cook Belgium employs 600 people. It says in a statement released Monday it is profitable, with some 700,000 vacationers using its services every year. Thomas Cook Belgium says it 'is currently exploring options to limit the impact of Thomas Cook Group Plc's bankruptcy on its customers and employees.' The company added that clients who booked their holidays via Thomas Cook Belgium or its local partner Neckermann are covered by a travel guarantee fund. The British tour company collapsed Monday after failing to secure emergency funding, leaving tens of thousands of vacationers stranded abroad. ___ 8:50 a.m. Unions representing Thomas Cook workers have reacted with anger to the collapse of the travel company. The general secretary of the British Airline Pilots' Association said Monday the hopes that the tour company could survive have been dashed. 'The staff have been stabbed in the back without a second's thought,' said union head Brian Strutton. He said Monday the union will do everything possible to help workers find jobs at other airlines. Manuel Cortes, leader of the Transport Salaried Staffs Association, said the collapse need not have happened. 'The government had been given ample opportunity to step in and help Thomas Cook but has instead chosen ideological dogma over saving thousands of jobs,' he said. ___ 7:40 a.m. Thomas Cook's German airline subsidiary, Condor, says it is still flying and is seeking a bridging loan from the German government. Condor said on its website Monday morning that its flights are going ahead as scheduled despite the parent company's insolvency. It said in a statement that 'to prevent liquidity shortages at Condor, a state-guaranteed bridging loan has been applied for.' It said that the German government is currently considering that application. Britain's Civil Aviation Authority said early Monday that Thomas Cook has ceased trading. ___ 6 a.m. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson says the government was right not to bail out tour company Thomas Cook, arguing that travel firms should do more to ensure they don't collapse. The 178-year-old tour operator ceased trading Monday after failing to secure 200 million pounds ($250 million) in rescue funding. Johnson said the government would help repatriate 150,000 stranded British travelers. But he said bailing out the company would have established 'a moral hazard' because other firms might later expect the same treatment. Johnson said, 'We need to look at ways in which tour operators one way or another can protect themselves from such bankruptcies in future.' He added, 'One is driven to reflect on whether the directors of these companies are properly incentivized to sort such matters out.' ___ 2:35 a.m. British tour operator Thomas Cook has ceased trading and all its hundreds of thousands of bookings canceled after the firm failed to secure rescue funding. The Civil Aviation Authority announced the film's collapse early Monday. More than 600,000 vacationers had booked through the company. CAA said 150,000 are British customers now abroad who will have to be repatriated. The group's four airlines will be grounded and its 21,000 employees in 16 countries, including 9,000 in the UK, will be left unemployed. The debt-laden company had said Friday it was seeking 200 million pounds ($250 million) to avoid going bust, was in talks with shareholders and creditors to stave off failure.
  • A school collapsed in Kenya's capital on Monday and killed at least seven children, officials said, while some outraged residents alleged shoddy construction. Two other children were in critical condition. 'We were in class reading and we heard pupils and teachers screaming, and the class started collapsing and then a stone hit me on the mouth,' one survivor, 10-year-old Tracy Oduor, told The Associated Press. 'When we got out of the gate we heard that pupils were dead. I feel so sad!' Parents wailed over the remains of The Precious Talent Top School in Nairobi, and hundreds of people gathered as emergency workers picked through debris. It was not clear whether anyone was trapped underneath. Government spokesman Cyrus Oguna confirmed the deaths, and Kenyatta National Hospital later said 64 children had been admitted, most with minor injuries. 'The children here were all running away and crying,' resident Michael Otieno said. More than 800 students are enrolled at the school, officials said. It was not immediately clear why the building of corrugated metal and wood collapsed around 7:30 a.m. Construction can be poorly regulated in some fast-growing Kenyan communities. 'You can easily break it with your own hands, as easy as that,' Peter Ouko, a resident, said of the building materials. 'This is chicken wire, not a construction material, and someone had the guts to use this to build a construction for our kids. I think this is basically premeditated murder.' Nathaniel Matalanga, a structural engineer with La Femme Engineering Services Ltd., told reporters that he didn't think 'any professionals' were involved in the school's construction and he blamed 'greed.' There was no immediate comment from school officials. ___ Follow Africa news at https://twitter.com/AP_Africa
  • Prince Harry and his wife, Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, began their first official tour as a family Monday with their infant son, Archie, in South Africa, with Meghan declaring to cheers that 'I am here with you as a mother, as a wife, as a woman, as a woman of color and as your sister.' The first day of their 10-day, multi-country tour started in Cape Town with visits to girls' empowerment projects that teach rights and self-defense. Harry danced a bit as a musical welcome greeted them in the township of Nyanga, whose location was not made public in advance because of security concerns. Violent crime is so deadly in parts of Cape Town that South Africa's military has been deployed in the city, and its stay was extended last week. The royal couple also was meeting with former residents of District Six, a vibrant mixed-race community that was relocated from the inner city during South Africa's harsh period of apartheid, or white minority rule, that ended in 1994. Their visit also will focus on wildlife protection, entrepreneurship, mental health and mine clearance — a topic given global attention by Harry's late mother, Princess Diana, when she walked through an active mine field during an Africa visit years ago. Harry later this week will break away for visits to Botswana, Angola and Malawi. The couple arrived in a South Africa still shaken by the rape and murder of a university student, carried out in a post office, that sparked protests by thousands of women tired of abuse and impunity in a country where more than 100 rapes are reported every day. This is 'one of the most unsafe places in the world to be a woman,' President Cyril Ramaphosa said last week, announcing new emergency measures and vowing to be tougher on perpetrators. While the royal visit wasn't causing the kind of excitement seen at times in other parts of the Commonwealth, some in South Africa said they were happy to see the arrival of Meghan, who has been vocal about women's rights. ___ Follow Africa news at https://twitter.com/AP_Africa