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    Kodak says a new beer hitting the market can be used to develop its Super 8 movie film. Dogfish Head Craft Brewery in Delaware created its SuperEIGHT beer after a conversation with people at Kodak, the upstate New York technology company most famous for its photographic roots. Dogfish learned from Kodak that heightened levels of acidity and vitamin C in certain beers could make them a processing agent for film. That inspired the brewery to design such a beer. Kodak helped by testing it. Dogfish founder Sam Calagione says he'll document his summer travels on Super 8 film that will be developed in SuperEIGHT beer and turned into a short film. The beer, made with pear, mango, berries, kiwi, quinoa and salt, is set for national distribution next month.
  • What if you were governor of Illinois and didn't have a thing to wear? If you're J.B. Pritzker, you look at your daily schedule. During his first six weeks in office, Pritzker's appointment calendar includes 70 'attire' recommendations for events as varied as bill signings, a state police officer's funeral, a White House dinner, surveying flood damage, and cocktails with legislators at the Illinois Governor's Mansion. Pritzker, among the nation's 400 richest people, needs sartorial suggestions? He's not alone. Joseph Rosenfeld, a fashion and personal style strategist in New York who's from the Illinois city of Buffalo Grove, maps out wardrobes with all his C-Suite executives. 'It comes back to one basic premise: relatability,' he said. Pritzker spokeswoman Jordan Abudayyeh said staff members get suggestions from organizers of the governor's events, but the governor ultimately decides what to wear. Fifty-five of the recommendations on the calendar, disclosed under the Freedom of Information Act, were simply, 'Business: suit and tie.' Khakis, 'button-down and pullover,' and 'polo with Columbia jacket' also make the mix. The Democrat was advised to forgo neckwear when he hosted dinner for union leaders, but 'Bring extra tie options' was the note on Feb. 9, the day of his official portrait. Despite his girth, Pritzker keeps his ties at a proper length, avoiding the long necktie look that President Donald Trump favors. While Pritzker often opts for a blazer and khakis, they're typically crisply pressed — no disheveled 'Mom jeans' like those for which former President Barack Obama was excoriated at baseball's 2009 All-Star Game. 'When you wear the right thing, you're message-focused,' said Patsy Cisneros, CEO of California-based Corporate Icon. 'As soon as someone does something that's off — the tie is too long, the color is wrong for the time and place — that will be the focus. What happens to the message of the day?' Gubernatorial fashion in Illinois gets a lot of attention. Disgraced former Gov. Rod Blagojevich's tailor regularly toted material swatches to the governor's Chicago office. Gov. Pat Quinn had a 'lucky' purple striped tie — more than one, as it turned out. Near-billionaire Gov. Bruce Rauner eschewed neckties with suits, wore big belt buckles, plaid shirts with rhinestone snaps, and a leather vest while astride his motorcycle. Jim Edgar, the Republican governor from 1991-1999, kept it simple. Indoors — or even at a late-season University of Illinois football game — he donned one of a dozen or so dark blue or gray suits. For a parade or picnic in fair weather, he had the same number of blue polo shirts and khakis. But there were fashion fails. Once, he was told his khakis were too light to wear in October. Another time, staff members drew straws to assign the task of telling Edgar to ditch a favorite pair of shoes. 'Times were different,' said Edgar, who frowns on the current trend of suits with no neckwear. 'I always thought you had to dress the part. You're the governor. You set the tone. ... You have to show respect for the crowd, whoever the audience is.' Democrat Quinn agreed that a governor dressed too casually 'diminishes the person and the office.' He said his ties of purple, the color of mourning, were appropriate for the more than 300 military funerals he attended while he was lieutenant governor (2003-2009) and governor (2009-2015). 'I'm not exactly a 'clothes horse' to begin with. I have three or four suits, a few shirts and ties. You wear those six, seven days a week. When they wore out, I went to Men's Wearhouse.' Rosenfeld said the fact that Pritzker's wardrobe guidance is made public 'is sort of telling in itself.' 'He's being deliberate, intentional, thoughtful,' Rosenfeld said. 'That is respectful of the public, the people he's dealing with, the way he serves as an officeholder.' ___ Associated Press researcher Jennifer Farrar in New York and writer Caryn Rousseau in Chicago contributed to this report. ___ Follow Political Writer John O'Connor at https://twitter.com/apoconnor .
  • An extremely rare albino penguin has made its debut at Gdansk Zoo in northern Poland. The albino penguin hatched in mid-December and has been under veterinary care. In the wild, such an unusual-looking penguin would be rejected by other penguins and would have little chance of survival. But in Gdansk, it has its parents and two other friendly penguins. The bird's sex has not yet been determined. It weighs over half a kilogram (1.1 pounds) and stands 28 centimeters (11 inches) tall. Zoo director Michal Targowski said Friday the albino penguin 'would have become the very first to be attacked by predators.' He said it requires special care, being prone to diseases since it lacks a protective black pigment. He said his team was astonished but are 'incredibly happy' to have a baby albino penguin.
  • A new challenge making waves on social media pokes fun at Florida's reputation for producing strange news stories involving guns, drugs, booze and reptiles — or some combination of the four. The challenge invites participants to run their birthday and 'Florida man' through a search engine to find out which headline pops up. Then they must post the result on social media. The 'Florida Man' concept crept into the nation's consciousness with the @_FloridaMan Twitter account in 2013. The account, with the tagline 'Real-life stories of the world's worst superhero,' has been home to recent headlines such as 'Florida Man Fire Bombs Garage That Impounded His Car, Hits His Own Vehicle' and 'Florida Man Tried to Pay for McDonald's With Weed.' The less common, but no less noteworthy, 'Florida Woman' subgenre has produced headlines such as 'A Florida woman was arrested and charged with aggravated assault without intent to kill after she reportedly 'farted loudly' in a Dollar Store and then pulled a knife on a man who complained.' 'Once, it seemed as though all the weird people and stories came from California. But over the past decade, it shifted to Florida,' said Jim Clark, a lecturer in the University of Central Florida's history department. 'Now, when I see a bizarre story, I am surprised when it is not from Florida.' A mixture of factors helps Florida birth these astounding tales. For starters, it's the nation's third largest state, with more than 20 million residents, and a random sample of any population that large is guaranteed to produce its share of the outrageous. Florida is also blessed with a liberal public records law that allows these stories to surface into plain view with little resistance or concern about taste. And then there's the combination of subtropical temperatures, palm trees and endless blue skies that seems to inspire some people to shed all inhibitions. Under the right circumstances, couldn't we be tempted to follow in the footsteps of 'Naked Florida man revealed on video sneaking into restaurant and munching on ramen'? ___ Follow Mike Schneider on Twitter at https://twitter.com/MikeSchneiderAP
  • Rosa Ferrigno's new suit takes recycling to an extreme — she knitted it from more than 300 plastic grocery bags. The 75-year-old woman from Greece in western New York whiled away the winter knitting a skirt and jacket from filmy brown bags scissored into thin strips that were tied together to make yarn. She lined it with cotton fabric. The finished garment is quite chic, with a tweedy look from green printing on the brown bags. Her daughter, Fran Bertalli, tells the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle that Ferrigno has been knitting and sewing since her childhood in Sicily. Last summer, Ferrigno saw someone's purse made from repurposed plastic bags and started her own bag projects, making two purses before the suit. She says she does it just for fun.
  • A sap bucket thief has brought a sour note to Vermont's maple sugaring season. Fred Hopkins tells MyNBC5 that someone took 140 of his sap buckets, a first for him. Hopkins makes award-winning maple syrup at his home in the town of St. Albans and gifts it to friends and family. He says he has since replaced many of the buckets that were located near a cemetery and the Franklin County Sportsman's Club. St. Albans police are looking for the culprit.
  • A wallaby who apparently escaped his owners went on a walkabout in an east Dallas neighborhood before being recaptured. Tim Tiernan said he and his wife were taking a morning walk Wednesday when they saw what they first thought was a dog. The wallaby hopped into the couple's driveway and up to their back door. Dallas Animal Services officers eventually caught the marsupial in the couple's backyard. The animal was identified as Muggsy and picked up by his owner. Officials didn't release the owner's name or how the wallaby escaped. The agency said the wallaby is kept on a country ranch. Wallabies are native to Australia and surrounding islands and are a close relative of the kangaroo.
  • A New Hampshire man celebrated his wedding anniversary by showing up at the airport in a bunny costume similar to the one used when he first proposed to his wife. Londonderry resident Mark DeAngelis says he asked his wife Jolene to marry him on Easter 1998, surprising her in a bunny suit. WMUR-TV reports DeAngelis went to the Manchester-Boston Regional Airport in a bunny suit Tuesday to meet his wife and daughters, who were flying back from a vacation. DeAngelis says he brought a new ring in a larger silver egg for the couple's 20th anniversary. Jolene says she was surprised and moved to tears. DeAngelis says the suit is almost identical to the one he wore 21 years ago. ___ Information from: WMUR-TV, http://wmur.com
  • Jason Windus gave his California neighbor something to look at during a dispute over the height of a backyard fence — naked mannequins having a garden party. Four of the fashion dummies are seated in wicker chairs around a matching table. Another is standing with its arms over its head and shamrocks over on its breasts. A hand-scrawled sign on top of a nearby wooden barrel reads, 'Reserved seat for the nosey neighbor that complained about my fence to the city.' 'They wanted me to tear down my fence to see inside my yard, and now they get to,' Windus said. Windus said he was building a 6-foot (2-meter) fence at his home in Santa Rosa so he could let his dogs out in his backyard when he got a letter from the city saying it violated an ordinance limiting such barriers along sidewalks to 3 feet (1 meter). 'It was a 6-foot fence, like everybody else's around here,' Windus said Tuesday. Windus asked why he was being singled out and was told City Hall was responding to a complaint. Windus, who owns a moving company, said the mannequins he had picked up from a clothing store came to mind as he pondered how to send a message to the neighbor. ___ Information from: The Santa Rosa Press Democrat, http://www.pressdemocrat.com
  • Law-breaking turned into breakdancing at the end of a Southern California vehicle pursuit. TV news helicopters were overhead Tuesday night when a suspect pursued by the California Highway Patrol finally surrendered, but broke out into a 10-second dance before being handcuffed. The pursuit began in the Calabasas area and headed east on U.S. 101 into Los Angeles, then north on Interstate 405 where the motorist exited the freeway in the San Fernando Valley. A CHP cruiser finally bumped the car and spun it out. The driver got out with hands up but did not appear to be fully complying with officers pointing guns at him. As the scene became illuminated by a law enforcement helicopter's spotlight, the driver suddenly busted a move before being busted.