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State & Regional

    ATLANTA (AP) - A billionaire technology investor and philanthropist says his family is providing grants to wipe out the student debt of the entire 2019 class at Morehouse College. Robert F. Smith made the announcement Sunday morning in front of nearly 400 graduating seniors and elicited the biggest cheers of the morning. Smith received an honorary doctorate from Morehouse during the ceremony. He had already announced a $1.5 million gift to the school. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports the pledge to eliminate the student debt for the class has been estimated at $40 million. Morehouse College is an all-male historically black college located in Atlanta. Smith is the Founder and CEO of Vista Equity Partners, a private equity firm that invests in software, data, and technology-driven companies. ___ Information from: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, http://www.ajc.com
  • SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) - Former state senator and executive director of the state Republican Party David Shafer has been elected chairman of the Georgia GOP. Shafer was elected Saturday at the party's state convention in Savannah. His victory comes just months after losing a bruising runoff for lieutenant governor. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that the election puts Shafer in charge of an apparatus that will coordinate millions in spending and plan campaign strategy ahead of the 2020 presidential race. Shafer had pledged to strengthen what he called 'neglected' grassroots operations in several counties that have no local GOP organizations. And he said he wanted to reverse a trend of Democratic victories in suburbs near Atlanta by reviving more confrontational tactics and going 'back on the offensive.' Shafer succeeds John Watson, who didn't seek another term. ___ Information from: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, http://www.ajc.com
  • ATLANTA (AP) _ These Georgia lotteries were drawn Sunday: 03-04-06-07-09-11-12-13-14-16-18-19 (three, four, six, seven, nine, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, sixteen, eighteen, nineteen) Estimated jackpot: $367 million Estimated jackpot: $288 million Mega Millions Powerball
  • ATLANTA (AP) _ The winning numbers in Sunday morning's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's 'All or Nothing Morning' game were: 03-04-06-07-09-11-12-13-14-16-18-19 (three, four, six, seven, nine, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, sixteen, eighteen, nineteen)
  • ATLANTA (AP) - A Georgia woman has opened a gender-neutral children's clothing store in Atlanta's Kirkwood neighborhood. The children's unisex clothing store is among the first of its kind, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported . Mini Friday sells clothes for children between the ages of 24 months and 8 years. Retailers have typically separated children's clothing into two categories. They've included pinks and purples and princess-inspired clothing for girls; and blues and grays and designs of trucks and dinosaurs for boys, the newspaper reported. Recently, a growing number of brands are embracing a non-gender specific style. Celebrities have also promoted the trend, such as singer Celine Dion, who has three children. Dion has unveiled a line of gender-neutral children's clothing in partnership with Israeli company Nununu, the newspaper reported. In Atlanta, sleeveless hoodies in shades of brown and gray hang next to brightly colored shirts with sea horses at Mini Friday. A row of track pants - in blue, orange, yellow - fills a long wooden table. 'At the end of the day, I just want a happy kid,' said Allie Friday, who opened the store. 'I decided I wanted to open my own gender neutral, safe space for all children who simply want to wear what they like, without judgment.' The idea harkens back to how Friday enjoyed dressing her young daughters, only two years apart, in matching outfits. They included sparkly dresses, frilly skirts, polka dot leggings. Before long, however, younger daughter Erin started complaining about the outfits. By the time she was 5, she refused to wear dresses, skirts, leggings and certainly anything pink. That experienced changed the way Friday viewed clothing for her youngest child - and other children as well, the newspaper reported. ___ Information from: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, http://www.ajc.com
  • ATLANTA (AP) - The Atlanta City Hall is renaming its council chambers after retired Superior Court Judge Marvin S. Arrington Sr. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports the council passed a resolution in February to name the chambers after Arrington, who was elected to the Atlanta Board of Alderman - now called the Atlanta City Council - in 1969 and served as president for 17 years. In 2002, former Gov. Roy Barnes appointed Arrington to the Fulton County Superior Court, where he served until his retirement in 2012. The renaming ceremony will be held at 1 p.m. Monday. ___ Information from: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, http://www.ajc.com
  • ATLANTA (AP) - As multiple states pass laws banning many abortions, questions have surfaced about what exactly that means for women who might seek an abortion. The short answer: nothing yet. Governors in Kentucky , Mississippi , Ohio and Georgia have recently approved bans on abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected, which can happen in the sixth week of pregnancy, before many women know they're pregnant, and Alabama's governor signed a measure making the procedure a felony in nearly all cases. Missouri lawmakers passed an eight-week ban Friday. Other states, including Louisiana , are considering similarly restrictive laws. None of the laws has actually taken effect, and all will almost definitely be blocked while legal challenges play out. The U.S. Supreme Court's landmark decision in Roe v. Wade said a woman has the right to choose whether to have an abortion. Supporters of the the new laws acknowledge that that they will initially be blocked, but they welcome the challenges. They've made it clear that their ultimate goal is to get the nation's highest court to reconsider its 1973 ruling now that the balance seems tipped in their favor. CAN WOMEN STILL GET ABORTIONS IN STATES WHERE THESE LAWS HAVE PASSED? Yes. Abortion remains legal nationwide. Abortion providers say that with all the coverage of the new laws, they've been getting calls from patients and potential patients who are confused about whether the procedure is still available. Although abortion is still legal everywhere, lawmakers in some states have passed less-restrictive measures that make accessing the procedure more difficult. That has resulted in six states having only a single abortion provider, while others have only two or three, according to the Guttmacher Institute, an abortion rights research group. WHO'S CHALLENGING THESE LAWS AND WHERE DO THOSE CHALLENGES STAND? Opponents of the laws are filing lawsuits and fully expect the measures won't be allowed to take effect while the court challenges are pending. A court blocked Kentucky's law from taking effect after the American Civil Liberties Union sued, and that case is ongoing. The ACLU and Planned Parenthood on Wednesday challenged Ohio's law, and they expect a court to keep it from entering effect as scheduled in July. Mississippi's law also is set to take effect in July, but it has been challenged by the Center for Reproductive Rights. Alabama's law would become enforceable in six months and Georgia's would take effect Jan. 1, but the ACLU plans to challenge both of those laws. WHY IS ALABAMA'S LAW GETTING SO MUCH ATTENTION? Alabama's law goes farther than the others. It makes abortion a felony in nearly all cases and includes no exceptions for cases of rape or incest. The only exception is when the pregnant woman's health is at serious risk. Republican state Rep. Terri Collins, who sponsored the bill, said adding any exceptions could harm the goal of creating a legal case that embryos and fetuses are people with rights of personhood. Another GOP lawmaker, Rep. Clyde Chambliss, said the bill was not about privacy, which is the legal foundation for Roe, but rather 'the right of an unborn child to live.' HOW DOES GEORGIA'S LAW CONFERRING PERSONHOOD ON A FETUS WORK? The law says, 'It shall be the policy of the State of Georgia to recognize unborn children as natural persons.' That caused some speculation that the law would allow women to be charged with murder if they get an abortion. Although a prosecutor could interpret the law that way, University of Georgia law professor emeritus Ron Carlson said he believes a woman 'cannot be successfully prosecuted' under the law, which seems primarily to target abortion providers. Elizabeth Nash with the Guttmacher Institute said some states have tried to enact fetal personhood measures by ballot initiatives in the past, but those have failed. That's partly because it could have such broad implications, including access to fertility treatments, inheritance rights and taxation, she said. 'There are a lot of consequences that we don't know yet,' she said.
  • ATLANTA (AP) - Jimmy Carter carved an unlikely path to the White House in 1976 and endured humbling defeat after one term. Now, six administrations later, the longest-living chief executive in American history is re-emerging from political obscurity at age 94 to win over his fellow Democrats once again. A peanut farmer turned politician then worldwide humanitarian, Carter is taking on a special role as several Democratic candidates look to his family-run campaign after the Watergate scandal as the road map for toppling President Donald Trump in 2020. 'Jimmy Carter is a decent, well-meaning person, someone who people are talking about again given the time that we are in,' Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar said in an interview. 'He won because he worked so hard, and he had a message of truth and honesty. I think about him all the time.' Klobuchar is one of at least three presidential hopefuls who've ventured to the tiny town of Plains, Georgia, to meet with Carter and his wife, Rosalynn, who is 91. New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker and Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Indiana, also have visited with the Carters and attended the former president's Sunday School lesson in Plains. Carter had planned to teach at Maranatha Baptist Church again Sunday, but he is still recuperating at home days after hip replacement surgery following a fall as he was preparing for a turkey hunt. 'An extraordinary person,' Buttigieg told reporters after meeting Carter. 'A guiding light and inspiration,' Booker said in a statement. Klobuchar has attended Carter's church lesson, as well, and says she emails with him occasionally. 'He signs them 'JC,'' she said with a laugh. It's quite a turnabout for a man who largely receded from party politics after his presidency, often without being missed by his party's leaders in Washington, where he was an outsider even as a White House resident. To be sure, more 2020 candidates have quietly sought counsel from Trump's predecessor, Barack Obama. Several have talked with Bill Clinton, who left office in 2001. But those huddles have been more hush-hush, disclosed through aides dishing anonymously. Sessions with Carter, on the other hand, are trumpeted on social media and discussed freely, suggesting an appeal that Obama and Clinton may not have. Unlike Clinton, impeached after an affair with a White House intern, Carter has no #MeToo demerits; he and Rosalynn, married since the end of World War II, didn't even like to dance with other people at state dinners. And unlike Obama, popular among Democrats but polarizing for conservatives and GOP-leaning independents, Carter is difficult to define by current political fault lines. He's an outspoken evangelical Christian who criticizes Trump's serial falsehoods, yet praises Trump for attempting a relationship with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Carter touts his own personal relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin, another Trump favorite. 'I have his email address,' Carter said in September. For years, Carter has irked the foreign policy establishment with forthright criticism of Israel and its treatment of Palestinians. He confirms that he voted for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, a democratic socialist, over Hillary Clinton in Georgia's 2016 presidential primary. In 2017, Carter welcomed Sanders, who's running again this year, to the Carter Center for a program in which the two men lambasted money in politics. Carter called the United States 'an oligarchy.' Yet Carter has since warned Democrats against 'too liberal a program,' lest they ensure Trump's re-election. Klobuchar credited Carter with being 'ahead of his time' on several issues, including the environment and climate change (he put solar panels on the White House), health care (a major step toward universal coverage failed mostly because party liberals thought it didn't go far enough) and government streamlining (an effort that angered some Democrats at the time). But she also alluded to how his presidency ended: a landslide loss after gas lines, inflation-then-unemployment, and a 14-month-long hostage crisis in Iran. 'Their administration was not perfect,' she said. Carter is enough of an enigma that he is the only living president not to draw Trump's ire or mockery, even if Republicans have caricatured Carter for decades as a failure. Trump and Carter chatted by phone this spring after Carter sent Trump a letter on China and trade. Both men said they had an amiable conversation. Buttigieg said he and Carter 'talked about being viewed as coming out of nowhere' and how Carter ran two general election campaigns entirely on the public financing system that now sits unused as candidates collectively raise money into the billions. Klobuchar recalled Carter telling her that 'family members would disperse to different states and then they would all come back on Friday, go back through the questions they had gotten.' Then 'he would talk about how he would answer them' so they'd all be prepared on their next trips, she said. It was 'a different era,' Klobuchar added, recalling that Carter said he felt 'high-tech because they had a fax machine on his plane.' Indeed, Klobuchar, born in 1960, wasn't old enough to vote for Carter until he sought a second term. Booker, 50, recalls voting for Carter, but in a grade-school mock election. Buttigieg, 37, wasn't even born when Carter left office. Nonetheless, Klobuchar said she regularly meets Iowans who remember Carter and his family members campaigning in 1975 before his rivals and national media recognized his strength. She said sometimes refers in the campaign to how her fellow Minnesotan and Carter's vice president, Walter Mondale, remembers their term: 'We obeyed the law. We told the truth. We kept the peace.' Whatever the reasons for the renewed attention, Carter allies say they hope the 2020 campaign is part of bolstering his reputation as a president. 'People are tired of hearing that he was a better ex-president than president,' said DuBose Porter, a former Georgia Democratic chairman who has known the Carters for decades. 'Of course he's done amazing things at the Carter Center, but he did great things for the country, and we're proud of it.' ___ Follow Barrow on Twitter at https://twitter.com/BillBarrowAP .
  • Milwaukee Brewers (27-21, second in the NL Central) vs. Atlanta Braves (25-21, second in the NL East) Atlanta; Sunday, 1 p.m. EDT PITCHING PROBABLES: Brewers: Brandon Woodruff (6-1, 3.72 ERA, 1.32 WHIP, 59 strikeouts) Braves: Mike Foltynewicz (6-3, 8.02 ERA, 1.55 WHIP, 14 strikeouts) LINE: Brewers favored by 1 1/2 runs; over/under is 9 1/2 runs The Braves are 14-11 in home games. Atlanta has a team on-base percentage of .337, good for third in the National League. Freddie Freeman leads the team with a mark of .403. The Brewers are 11-13 on the road. Milwaukee has hit 75 home runs this season, fourth in the league. Christian Yelich leads the club with 18, averaging one every 8.5 at-bats. TOP PERFORMERS: Freeman leads the Braves with 23 extra base hits and is slugging .566. Josh Donaldson is 9-for-32 with two doubles, two home runs and five RBIs over the last 10 games for Atlanta. Yelich leads the Brewers with 18 home runs and has 40 RBIs. Mike Moustakas is 11-for-44 with four doubles, three home runs and seven RBIs over the last 10 games for Milwaukee. LAST 10 GAMES: Braves: 7-3, .282 batting average, 4.30 ERA, outscored opponents by five runs Brewers: 5-5, .255 batting average, 3.12 ERA, outscored opponents by 15 runs Braves Injuries: Arodys Vizcaino: 60-day IL (shoulder), Chad Sobotka: 10-day IL (abdomen), Darren O'Day: 10-day IL (forearm), Ender Inciarte: 10-day IL (lumbar strain). Brewers Injuries: Bobby Wahl: 60-day IL (knee), Brent Suter: 60-day IL (elbow), Jimmy Nelson: 10-day IL (shoulder), Corey Knebel: 60-day IL (elbow), Travis Shaw: 10-day IL (wrist), Manny Pina: 10-day IL (hamstring). ___ The Associated Press created this story using technology provided by HERO Sports, and data from Sportradar.
  • ATLANTA (AP) _ The winning numbers in Saturday evening's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's 'Cash 3 Night' game were: 5-8-0 (five, eight, zero)