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National

    This is quite a dog tale. >> Read more trending news  A 10-week-old dachshund mix from southeast Missouri has what looks like a tail growing out of his forehead, and his puppy dog eyes have taken the internet by storm. The puppy's name -- Narwhal -- pays tribute to the toothed whale that has a large tusk growing from its head that is actually a protruding canine tooth. However, some people on social media are calling him a 'unicorn puppy.' 'He’s got an extra what looks like a perfect tail sitting in the center of his forehead,” Brian Heuring, a veterinarian at Cape Small Animal Clinic in Cape Girardeau, told WFVS. Narwhal was found earlier this month by Mac's Mission, an area rescue group, KDSK reported. Officials from Mac's Mission took the puppy to the veterinarian, who said there was no reason to remove the growth, KVFS reported. Since Narwhal's photo was posted Friday on social media, the pup has received thousands of comments and the original post has been shared numerous times. Narwhal is not bothered by the tail, and he is unable to wag it. “He is pretty much the most unique amazing example of what we do here, and we are so thankful to have the chance to be part of his journey,” officials with the rescue said in a Facebook post.
  • Southern California Edison has agreed to pay $360 million to local governments to settle lawsuits over deadly wildfires sparked by its equipment during the last two years, including one blamed for a mudslide that killed more than 20 people, the utility and attorneys announced Wednesday. The sum will reimburse counties, cities and other public agencies for firefighting costs and repairing damage from two of the worst blazes in the region’s history. The figure will not fully repay taxpayer costs, but it will help pay the bills to rebuild roads, other infrastructure and clean up debris, among other things. “While this is not 100%, it’s not pennies on the dollar,” said attorney John Fiske, who represents local governments. “A lot of these communities ... were hit very hard. In the aftermath of these wildfires, all sorts of public resources and taxpayer resources are lost.” The Thomas Fire that broke out in dry brush in Ventura County was sparked when the utility’s power lines slapped together in high winds on Dec. 4, 2017. Two people were killed and 440 square miles (1,139 square kilometers) were burned. The area that was hit included a mountainside above the seaside city of Montecito, where a deluge a month later on fire-scarred terrain triggered a devastating mudslide that killed at least 21 people. Two people remain missing. The Woolsey Fire started with the company’s equipment a year ago just outside Los Angeles and quickly spread to the coast, jumping a highway and crossing the Santa Monica Mountains into Malibu. It destroyed more than 1,600 structures — mostly homes — and killed three people. The settlement does not include private lawsuits for deaths and homes destroyed. The payout will be split among the counties of Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles and includes the cities of Santa Barbara, Malibu, Calabasas, Thousand Oaks and Westlake Village. The settlement is the most comprehensive in state history because it involves 23 public entities, Fiske said. But the overall figure is dwarfed by the $1 billion settlement Pacific Gas & Electric reached with local governments in Northern California for fires its equipment caused in recent years. The damage from those fires, however, was much greater with more than 20,000 homes destroyed.
  • The 53rd annual CMA Awards ceremony is set for Wednesday with a trio of female country superstars hosting the event. >> Read more trending news  Carrie Underwood, who has hosted the show for 12 years, will get help from Dolly Parton and Reba McEntire during this year’s show.Country stars Willie Nelson and Garth Brooks will perform. You could see a lot of Maren Morris who has six nominations this year, more than any other nominee.Keith Urban, who won entertainer of the year last year, is nominated for the honor again.Here is what you need to know about the show.When is the show?The CMA Awards are set to air on Wednesday.What time is it on?The show begins at 8 p.m. ETWhat channel is broadcasting it?The show will be on ABC.Who is performing?Here are some of the stars set to perform Wednesday:Garth BrooksBlake SheltonDierks BentleySheryl CrowChris JansonJohn OsborneDolly PartonFor King & CountryZach WilliamsChris StapletonLady AntebellumEric ChurchBrothers OsborneKacey MusgravesHalseyDan + ShayWillie NelsonPinkKelsea BalleriniMiranda LambertOld Dominion Who has the most nominations?Maren Morris has six nominations this year.Who is nominated for new artist?New artist nominees are Cody Johnson, Carly Pearce, Midland, Ashley McBryde and Morgan Wallen.Who is nominated for entertainer of the year?Nominated are Garth Brooks, Eric Church, Chris Stapleton, Carrie Underwood and Keith Urban.
  • Jimmy Carter’s pastor said the former president is “in good spirits” just one day after undergoing brain surgery. >> Read more trending news The Rev. Tony Lowden, pastor of Maranatha Baptist Church in Plains, Georgia, was in Atlanta on Wednesday visiting Carter at Emory University Hospital. “His spirits are good, and he is up and walking,” Lowden said. Carter was admitted to the hospital on Monday to deal with bleeding near his brain, caused by a series of falls over the past few weeks. Carter was diagnosed with a subdural hematoma and was operated on early Tuesday morning to relieve pressure on his brain. A spokeswoman for Carter said there were no complications from the procedure, but wouldn’t give a timetable on his release. He “will remain in the hospital as long as advisable for observation,” said Deanna Congileo on Tuesday. Lowden drove to Atlanta on Wednesday with dozens of well wishes from the president’s boyhood home of Plains and his home church, Maranatha. “Everyone is praying and concerned about him and making sure that he is OK,” Lowden said. Young visited their church on Sunday to teach Sunday School with Carter. Lowden said he expects to field at least one question from Carter: When can he return to teaching Sunday School? Carter has been teaching Sunday School regularly at Maranatha for 40 years. After he broke his hip in May and fractured his pelvis in October, Carter missed both of his immediately scheduled classes, but quickly made them up the following Sundays. “I am going to tell him that we have everything in order at the church, and he doesn’t have to worry about anything,” Lowden said. “There is no need to rush.”
  • A neighbor told investigators Taylor Rose Williams, the 5-year-old girl who vanished last week from her home in Jacksonville, Florida, was often left home alone before her reported disappearance.  >> Read more trending news  Authorities in Alabama said Tuesday that they discovered human remains while searching for Taylor. Forensic tests were ongoing to confirm the identity of the remains. Police said Taylor was last seen around 12 a.m. Wednesday in her bedroom at her home in the Brentwood area. Her mother, Brianna Williams, has since been arrested and charged with giving false information to law enforcement and child neglect. Here are the latest updates: Update 3:50 p.m. EST Nov. 13: A warrant issued for the arrest of 5-year-old Taylor Williams' mother, Brianna Williams, shows a neighbor told detective he saw Taylor wandering the apartment complex alone on multiple occasions. He told authorities he first noticed Taylor alone on the morning of April 17, while he was sitting on his balcony talking on the phone. He said he saw Taylor wandering up the stairs from the breezeway and that he asked her what she was doing. 'Looking for my momma,' she answered, according to the neighbor's account. He told police he took her back to her apartment. He described the inside of the apartment as cluttered, with trash bags and boxes stacked on top of each other. He said he continued to see Taylor home alone at least every other day, adding that she would wave to him from within her apartment. During these times, he said Brianna Williams' car was not in the apartment parking lot. He said Taylor always wore the same pajamas and held the same doll. He said he saw Brianna Williams routinely arrive home between 6:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. He told authorities the last time he saw Brianna Williams and her daughter together was May 21, 2019. He said he hadn't seen Taylor since that day and that when he asked Brianna Williams about her daughter's whereabouts, she said the 5-year-old was in Alabama with her grandparents. >> Read more on ActionNewsJax.com Update 3 p.m. EST Nov. 13: Hospital officials told WJAX-TV that Brianna Williams, the mother of Taylor Williams was no longer listed Wednesday afternoon as a patient. She was taken to the hospital Tuesday afternoon after being found unresponsive at Naval Air Station Jacksonville from an apparent overdose. Update 8:07 a.m. EST Nov. 13: Brianna Williams' bond has been set at $1.1 million, according to the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office Department of Corrections website. That includes $100,000 for one count of giving false information to law enforcement and $500,000 each for two counts of child neglect, the website said. Update 5:35 p.m. EST Nov. 12:  Search teams recovered the remains of a child in Alabama. Exact identification has not been made. Brianna Williams has been arrested and charged with child neglect and giving false information to investigators. Brianna Williams is in the hospital due to an apparent overdose. Williams is in serious condition. Anyone with additional information is still asked to contact the Sheriff's Office. This investigation is 'no where near done,' according to Sheriff Mike Williams. Update 3:50 p.m. EST Nov. 12: Sources told WJAX-TV that Brianna Williams, mother of missing Florida 5-year-old Taylor Rose Williams, was taken to a hospital Tuesday, hours after authorities announced they had found human remains while searching for her daughter. Brianna Williams, who is a Petty Officer 1st Class at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, had previously been identified as a person of interest in her daughter's disappearance. Officials with the Demopolis, Alabama, Police Department said Tuesday that human remains were found between Demopolis and Linden, Alabama, during the search for Taylor. Forensic testing was ongoing Tuesday to identify the remains. Brianna Williams previously lived about 15 miles from Demopolis. Update 1:30 p.m. EST Nov. 12: Police in Demopolis, Alabama, said human remains were found in a wooded area between the Alabama cities of Linden and Demopolis during the search for Taylor Rose Williams. Authorities said Tuesday that the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office was awaiting the results of forensic tests to identify the remains. Update 1:15 p.m. EST Nov. 12: Authorities in Demopolis, Alabama, said human remains have been discovered during the search for Taylor Rose Williams, 5. Update 2:15 p.m. EST Nov. 11: Jacksonville Sheriff Mike Williams said Taylor Williams' mother is considered a person of interest in her daughter's disappearance. Williams said Monday at a news conference that Brianna Williams has remained uncooperative since shortly after Taylor's disappearance. 'She has not spoken to us since Wednesday and she was the last person to see Taylor,' Williams said. Authorities confirmed officials were searching the Demopolis, Alabama, area in hopes of finding Taylor. Williams said the search area was large Monday afternoon, but added that he expected it to be whittled down later in the evening. 'There's a lot of different efforts going on right now in this investigation,' Williams said. 'The information that drove us to Alabama demanded this response, and we absolutely hope to find her alive.' Williams asked that anyone who saw Taylor or her mother between Jacksonville and Alabama in the last two weeks contact authorities. Rachel Rojas, special agent-in-charge of the Jacksonville FBI office, said several teams, including the Child Abduction Response Team and the Cellular Analysis Survey Team, have been part of the investigation. Update 1:40 p.m. EST Nov. 11: Officials with the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office are holding a news conference Monday afternoon to update the public on the search for Taylor Williams. Update 10:50 a.m. EST Nov. 11: Police in Jacksonville have expanded their search efforts for a missing girl to include Georgia and Alabama. The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office said in a news conference last week that they were working with investigators in Alabama because Taylor's mother, Brianna Williams, has family there. The Demopolis Police Department said Sunday afternoon that they were assisting the FBI and other out-of-state agencies in a search for a missing person around the Demopolis area. It was not immediately clear whether the search was connected to Taylor's disappearance. Demopolis is about 15 miles away from where Brianna Williams previously lived.  Update 8:53 a.m. EST Nov. 10: Detectives are looking into a Craigslist ad that may have been posted by Brianna Williams the day before reporting her daughter, Taylor Rose Williams, was missing. The poster of the ad states 'childcare needed tomorrow' because they were 'bailed on,' Action News Jax reported. Brianna Williams’ name is not on the ad, but the poster mentions having a 5-year-old daughter, working at the Jacksonville Naval Air Station, and living in Jacksonville's Northside section. Update 9 p.m. EST Nov 7: First Coast Crime Stoppers announced it has increased the reward in the case for missing 5-year-old Taylor Williams to $4,000. The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office is working with another agency in a different state as it investigates the disappearance of Taylor Williams.  Brianna Williams, Taylor's mother, is from Alabama. The Sheriff's Office said it is working with investigators in Alabama because Brianna Williams has family there. While Sheriff Mike Williams said Brianna Williams is not cooperating in the investigation, some of her family members are. Some family members have come from out of town to speak with police. Update 4 p.m. EST Nov 7: Jacksonville Sheriff Mike Williams said Taylor's mother Brianna S. Williams is no longer being cooperative with the investigation. When asked if Brianna Williams is considered a person of interest in her daughter's disappearance, Sheriff Williams said 'Nothing's off the table.' Sheriff Williams is asking anyone who has seen Taylor and Brianna Williams together in Jacksonville in the last six months to contact the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office at (904) 630-0500. Original report: Taylor's mother, Brianna S. Williams, who is a Petty Officer 1st Class at NAS Jacksonville, told police she put Taylor to bed around midnight. Williams told police when she woke up at 7 a.m., she did not see Taylor in her bedroom and the back door was unlocked. Taylor was last seen wearing a purple shirt and pink pajama pants. She is 3 feet tall and weighs 50 pounds.  >> Read more trending news  Officers have been going door-to-door in the Brentwood neighborhood and have a helicopter to get an above view to aid in the massive search. Crews with the JSO Dive Team arrived at one of the search areas near the Southside Villas apartment complex where Taylor had lived with her family until recently, as well as two JSO trucks, a small boat and ATV/tractor type vehicle. They searched in the water in a former neighborhood looking for Taylor, Wednesday afternoon. A dumpster was taken from the Southside Villas apartment complex and eventually, the contents were emptied. Law and Safety Expert Dale Carson said the first 12 hours are critical when searching for a child, in a situation like this, because evidence can disappear in a 12-hour period and clues could be lost that can help find them. Officials in Jacksonville said more than 100 police officers, firefighters search dogs, dive teams, mounted police, drone units and volunteers are assisting to help find her. If you see her or know of her whereabouts, you are asked to call police at 904-630-0500. The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.
  • Some Capital One customers might see a delay in their paychecks Friday as the bank investigates a technical issue impacting direct deposits, company officials said. >> Read more trending news  Capital One representatives said in a tweet Friday morning that the bank was 'experiencing a technical issue impacting customer money movement, including direct deposits, and the ability for some customers to access accounts.' 'We are actively working to resolve the issue and restore all services,' company officials said. 'We greatly apologize for the inconvenience.' The issue was resolved around 3:10 p.m. EDT Friday. The technical issue is at least the second this week to affect Capital One customers. On Monday, bank customers reported issues with the Capital One mobile app and the bank's website. It was not immediately clear how long it would take to resolve the technical issue discovered Friday.
  • Sara Krauseneck was 3 years old the day her mother was found dead with an ax blade embedded in her skull. Now 41, Sara Krauseneck stood by her father’s side Friday as he walked into an upstate New York courtroom to face charges that he killed Cathleen Schlosser Krauseneck and left their then-toddler daughter to spend the day alone with her mother’s dead body. James Krauseneck Jr., 67, of Peoria, Arizona, is charged with second-degree murder in Cathleen Krauseneck’s Feb. 19, 1982, slaying. The 29-year-old wife and mother was found slain in the bedroom of the couple’s Brighton, New York, home. Cathleen Krauseneck’s sister, Annet Schlosser, told MSN via phone on Friday that the charges against her former brother-in-law were long-awaited by her family. “My family will see justice for Cathy, we hope,” Schlosser said. “We still have a way to go yet with the trial, but this is a huge step forward.” James Krauseneck pleaded not guilty during his arraignment Friday. He was released on $100,000 bail and was ordered to surrender his passport. “This is one of the worst outcomes of domestic violence that this agency has investigated,” Brighton Police Chief David Catholdi said at a news conference Tuesday morning. “And this was domestic violence.” >> Read more trending news Catholdi was surrounded by local, state and federal law enforcement officers, both active and retired, who worked on the 37-year-old homicide case. “Hundreds, if not thousands, of investigative hours went into this case over the last few decades,” Catholdi said. Ultimately, it was the assistance of renowned forensic pathologist Dr. Michael Baden that led to the murder charge against James Krauseneck, who claimed he was at work when his wife was killed. Baden conducted a thorough review of the timeline of Cathleen Krauseneck’s death, the police chief said. “We believe in examining the timeline of events, speaking with witnesses and James’ timeline -- that he provided -- along with all other evidence, we will establish that James Krauseneck Jr. was home at the time of the murder,” Catholdi said. Baden, who briefly served as chief medical examiner for the City of New York in the late 1970s, chaired the forensic pathology panel of the House Select Committee on Assassinations, which probed both the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy and the 1968 assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. In the decades since then, he has testified in numerous high-profile cases -- often for the defense -- including the murder trials of former football great O.J. Simpson and record producer Phil Spector. Now a private forensic pathologist, Baden most recently spurred controversy for disputing the official claim that disgraced financier and convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein hanged himself in his jail cell Aug. 10. Baden said multiple broken bones in Epstein’s neck pointed instead to manual strangulation. Jeremy Bell, a special agent with the FBI, said he hopes Friday’s charge against James Krauseneck brings some closure to the victim’s family, but also that it puts other suspected criminals on edge. “I hope it puts criminals everywhere on notice: Just because the years go by doesn’t mean you can stop looking over your shoulder,” Bell said. “We’re coming.” Monroe County District Attorney Sandra Doorley thanked the Brighton officers in a Facebook statement for never giving up on solving the Krauseneck case.  “I want to thank the Brighton Police Department, who has worked with the Monroe County District Attorney’s Office since 1982, for never giving up on finding justice for Cathleen Krauseneck,” Doorley wrote. “We look forward to bringing this case through the criminal justice system and finally bringing justice to Cathleen, her friends and family.” A shocking crime  Catholdi said police officers responded to the Krauseneck home at 33 Del Rio Drive in Brighton around 5 p.m. Feb. 19, 1982, after a neighbor called 911. The officers were ultimately led into the master bedroom of the family’s home, where they found a grisly scene. Cathleen Krauseneck was dead, the victim of a single blow to the head with an ax. The blade of the wood-cutting tool, which was taken from the couple’s unlocked garage, was still embedded in her forehead. The handle of the ax had been wiped clean, testing would later show. “What followed was an extensive investigation that led Brighton police officers, Brighton investigators and Brighton chiefs of police across the United States to Mount Clemens, Michigan; Fort Collins, Colorado; Lynchburg, Virginia; Gig Harbor, Washington; and Houston, Texas,” Catholdi said. The Democrat & Chronicle in Rochester reported that James Krauseneck told police he found his wife dead when he came home from his job as an economist at Eastman Kodak Co. At the time, Cathleen Krauseneck’s estimated time of death could not be pinpointed to before or after 6:30 a.m., when James Krauseneck said he left for work. Krauseneck said his wife was asleep, but alive, when he left their home that morning, the Democrat & Chronicle reported. Investigators, who found a window broken from the outside, initially theorized that Cathleen Krauseneck was killed during a botched burglary, but nothing was reported stolen from the home. Along with the ax, a maul used for splitting wood was taken from the garage and, investigators theorized, was used to smash the window. Their investigation shifted, however, to the possibility of a domestic situation that turned deadly. The couple had been married since 1974, Catholdi said Tuesday. The News Tribune in Tacoma, Washington, reported that the couple attended high school together but began dating as students at Western Michigan University. According to Cathleen Krauseneck’s family, the couple lived in Colorado and Virginia before settling in their home in Brighton, the News Tribune reported. The victim’s family told the newspaper the couple began having problems in Brighton after James Krauseneck, then 30 years old, was accused at work of lying about having earned a doctorate. He also reportedly told administrators at Lynchburg College, where he was an assistant professor of economics, that he had a doctorate, the Democrat & Chronicle reported in 2016. Cathleen Krauseneck had confronted her husband about the alleged lies, her family told authorities. Neighbors and friends also indicated there may have been domestic abuse in the couple’s relationship, according to police officials. The Democrat & Chronicle reported in 2017, when the former Krauseneck home went on the market, that Cathleen Krauseneck was not the first resident of the house to die there. In 1977, five years before the killing, homeowners Dr. Anthony Schifino and his wife, Estelle, died of carbon monoxide poisoning. The newspaper reported that the couple accidentally left their car running in the garage.  Authorities said James Krauseneck participated in a police interview the night his wife was found dead but failed to show up for a follow-up interview the next day. Investigators learned he had taken his daughter and moved to his Michigan hometown of Mount Clemens. Investigators went to Michigan to speak to James Krauseneck. The News Tribune reported that, although he agreed to have a child psychologist talk to his young daughter about what she may have witnessed, that appointment never took place. According to the Press & Sun-Bulletin in Binghamton, New York, Sara Krauseneck initially told police she saw a “bad man” in the room with her mother and said the man had a hammer. She was not allowed to speak to authorities again, however.  James Krauseneck also stopped cooperating with police, as did his family, authorities said. “They’re all reluctant to offer information,” a Brighton detective told The Macomb Daily in a 1985 article, according to the News Tribune. “It’s like Cathleen was murdered, taken off the face of the Earth, and no one wants to help.” James Krauseneck later moved to Gig Harbor, just outside of Tacoma. Investigators from Brighton spoke to him there in April 2016, the News Tribune reported. He retained attorneys in both Washington and New York at that time. Two days after detectives left Washington, James Krauseneck and his wife -- his fourth at that point -- put their home up for sale, the newspaper reported. The couple moved to Arizona after he retired as vice-president from what his attorneys described in a statement as a Fortune 500 company. James Krauseneck’s wife, Sharon Krauseneck, was also in court with him Friday. Watch the entire Brighton Police Department news conference below.  ‘Not a proverbial smoking gun’  Retired Brighton Police Chief Mark Henderson began taking a fresh look at the Krauseneck homicide case in 2015, Catholdi said Tuesday. Agents with the FBI’s Cold Case Working Group digitized the boxes of handwritten case notes and other evidence. “In 1982, there were not computers,” Henderson said Tuesday. “Our files, our paperwork was not digitized. One of the first things that the FBI did was to convert everything from handwritten paper to digital, searchable files.” Investigators had a theory, an “idea which way to go,” Henderson said. They met with Doorley, the district attorney, whose own investigators began looking into the case. “This path was over a number of years,” Henderson said. “When I heard that there was an arrest made, an indictment that was going to be unsealed on Friday, I knew that it would lead to the husband of the individual.” No one piece of evidence has led investigators to charge James Krauseneck, Catholdi said. “I understand people want a singular piece of evidence that can directly point to James Krauseneck Jr.,” Catholdi said. “This is not one of those cases.” The chief said the “totality of the circumstances,” along with the evidence and the timeline of events led to James Krauseneck’s arrest. FBI testing showed no DNA from anyone but James Krauseneck on any of the evidence gathered 37 years ago. “DNA, fingerprints, or the lack thereof, can speak volumes,” Catholdi said. “James lived at 33 Del Rio Drive, and one would suspect his DNA would be in his house. “It is telling no other physical evidence at the scene, to include DNA, points to anyone other than James Krauseneck Jr.” Catholdi said Baden’s timeline will be crucial to the case when it comes up for trial. “There’s not a proverbial smoking gun,” he said. “What really cinched the case was the fresh look at it.” James Krauseneck’s attorneys, Michael Wolford and William Easton, dispute there is any evidence linking their client to Cathleen Krauseneck’s murder. “Jim’s innocence was clear 37 years ago. It’s clear today,” the attorneys said in a written statement. “At the end of the case, I have no doubt Jim will be vindicated.” Wolford and Easton said James Krauseneck was cooperative with the investigation, “repeatedly giving statements to the police, consenting to the search of his home and his car.” Wolford, who represented Krauseneck at the time of the killing, said he placed “reasonable conditions” on further questioning once he realized his client was the target of the investigation. William Gargan, who heads the domestic violence unit for the Monroe County District Attorney’s Office, countered the attorneys’ claims that their client cooperated with police. “I think the word ‘cooperation’ may have a different meaning for Mr. Wolford than it does for me and the Brighton Police Department,” Gargan said Tuesday. Gargan also disputed Wolford and Easton’s description of the prosecution, which they called “misguided” in their written statement. “I can tell you that there has been only one thing that DA Doorley, the Brighton Police Department and the town of Brighton have sought to do. And that is to seek the truth, wherever the facts, wherever the evidence may lead them,” Gargan said. ‘To have her die like that is so unfair’  Catholdi said Tuesday that following James Krauseneck’s arraignment, he, Henderson and other members of the investigative team called the victim’s family to tell them of the arrest. “They were grateful for our efforts and plan to attend the upcoming trial next year,” Catholdi said. Catholdi closed his comments with a statement that now-deceased Brighton Police Chief Eugene Shaw made to a newspaper in February 1983, days before the first anniversary of Cathleen Krauseneck’s death. “I’m not known to be a pessimist, so I’d say optimistically, hopefully, yes,” Shaw said when asked if the case would end in a successful prosecution. Catholdi expressed his own optimism about the outcome of a trial, which is tentatively slated for next summer. “Please know that the police across this region will never forget our victims,” Catholdi said. “These cases stay with us forever. “We know we are the only ones able to speak for victims. We will investigate cases like this as long as it takes, and we will use all of our investigative abilities to bring justice for victims and their families.” Henderson said Tuesday that the crime had a significant impact on the community, the Police Department and Shaw, who was never able to forget the unsolved case. “I know that the inability to bring this case forward really weighed heavily on Chief Shaw,” Henderson said. Henderson said he did not “reopen” the case in 2015 because it was never closed. Tips and prospective leads came in through the years and each was investigated, he said. In 2015, an FBI agent approached investigators about the FBI’s Cold Case Working Group, offering its services on any unsolved cases the department might have, Henderson said. Henderson said the department decided to start from “ground zero” on the case, working in conjunction with the FBI group. The retired chief said he met with the Schlosser family in 2015 at their home in Michigan. “I talked about the commitment that the town of Brighton was going to make to a fresh look at this case,” Henderson said. He and Brighton police Detective Mark Liberatore, the lead investigator on the case, sat across the dining room table from Cathleen Krauseneck’s parents, Robert and Theresa Schlosser. Theresa Schlosser has since died but Robert Schlosser, now 92, has lived to see an arrest made in his daughter’s killing.  “I assured them that we would be looking at this case, that we would commit every resource that we had in 2015 and 2016 … and that justice would be served for their daughter Cathleen,” Henderson said. Annet Schlosser watched the news conference Tuesday from her home in Warren, Michigan. She told the Press & Sun-Bulletin that her family initially thought James Krauseneck incapable of killing her older sister. His lack of cooperation with investigators made them think twice. “Why would a man ... not try to seek justice for his wife?” Schlosser said. “That never made sense to us. “It’s been 37 years. I would say that it was at least 20 years ago that we started to think he did it.” Schlosser told the newspaper James Krauseneck turned her niece against the Schlosser family, whose members have gone years without seeing Sara Krauseneck -- or her two children.  “They’re no longer part of our life, and that’s devastating to us,” she said. In 2016, Schlosser described her sister for the Democrat & Chronicle as her best friend, despite a 10-year age difference. “She was the most genuine, intelligent, loving person,” Schlosser said. “There isn’t a bad word that you can think about when describing my sister, and to have her die like that is so unfair.”
  • California regulators opened a formal investigation Wednesday into pre-emptive power outages that blacked out large parts of the state in October, drawing strong rebukes from public officials and residents who said the shut-offs were too broad and poorly executed. The unanimous vote by the California Public Utilities Commission followed testimony from a handful of people who pleaded with the regulatory body for leadership at a time of increased danger from fire and other natural disasters. “Many Californians are debating whether California is still safe. Is this a safe place to live?” said Will Abrams of Santa Rosa, whose house burned down in 2017 in wildfires that roared through Northern California wine country. The state’s largest utility, Pacific Gas & Electric Co., initiated multiple rounds of shut-offs and plunged nearly 2.5 million people into darkness at one point throughout Northern and Central California. Some of the outages lasted for several days. PG&E officials insisted on the shut-offs for public safety, but infuriated residents and a parade of public officials, including Gov. Gavin Newsom, said cutting off power should be used only as a last resort and that the company regularly botched communications. Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. also shut off power but to far fewer people. Nevada City Mayor Reinette Senum said Wednesday that her rural community had no working phones or internet. She wants local control over the power grid, which she said could take better care than the for-profit utility. “Basically, we were sent back into the dark ages,” she said. The outages raised concerns about whether the utilities “properly balanced the need to provide reliable service with public safety and were properly planned and executed,” said the order authorizing the investigation. CPUC President Marybel Batjer requested the investigation, saying that widespread outages “cannot be the new normal for California.” Commissioners said Wednesday that they want to know if utilities took the proper steps and what can be done to improve such shut-offs or lessen their scope in the future. Abrams not only lost his home in the 2017 wildfires, but his children had to endure smoke from a deadly 2018 wildfire in Paradise. Last month, the family evacuated from another Sonoma County wildfire and were terrified to cross into the San Francisco Bay Area amid smaller grassland fires sparked by PG&E lines falling amid high, hot winds, he said. “The wonderful thing about regulators is you can cut through the rhetoric,” he said. Commissioners have been stewing over the outages. Last month, they grilled PG&E officials at an emergency meeting called by Batjer, demanding answers for why the utility was so unprepared for an Oct. 9 shutdown in which counties and customers struggled with a crashing website and overworked call lines to get information. Batjer said she was “absolutely astounded” by the company’s lack of preparation. When many cell towers were down and internet services out, the utility was telling people to get information from a website, through family or call on a landline. The outages were astonishing for a state that is one of the world’s economic powerhouses. People made frantic dashes for cash and gas as businesses watched their goods spoil. Some elderly and disabled people were trapped in their apartments with elevators out of service. PG&E initiated five rounds, with the smallest affecting about 30,000 people and the largest affecting nearly 2.5 million. Residents in San Francisco suburbs and in Northern California wine country were without power for days. Bill Johnson, CEO of Pacific Gas & Electric Corp., said the outages were the right call and kept people safe, although a transmission line in Sonoma County that was not powered off malfunctioned minutes before a wildfire erupted Oct. 23, forcing about 180,000 people to evacuate. The company is in bankruptcy and faces $30 billion in liabilities after its equipment was found to have started several deadly wildfires in 2017 and 2018, including the year-old Camp Fire that killed 85 in Butte County. In September, PG&E reached an $11 billion settlement with most of the insurers covering victims of deadly wildfires, but Newsom is stepping up pressure on PG&E to fork over billions more. If PG&E doesn't make changes, Newsom is threatening to try to turn the utility into a customer-owned cooperative run by the state and local governments. The company so far has defended its proposal as a fair deal for all parties involved in its bankruptcy. Southern California Edison also initiated five preventive outages but to far fewer customers. The company has announced that its equipment likely caused last year's Woolsey Fire, which killed three people and destroyed hundreds of homes in Los Angeles and Ventura counties. ____ Associated Press Business Writer Michael Liedtke contributed to this story.
  • Two State Department officials who expressed concerns about President Donald Trump’s efforts to pressure Ukraine to investigate a potential political opponent are testifying before a House committee Wednesday morning. >> Read more trending news  William Taylor, chargé d'affaires for Ukraine, and George Kent, deputy assistant secretary for European and Eurasian Affairs, will be answering questions before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence in the first public hearing in the impeachment inquiry into Trump’s dealings with Ukraine. Watch the live stream for Wednesday’s hearings here: Follow along with live updates below.  Live updates The hearing has ended 3:35 p.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: The hearing is over, but the representatives will be coming back to consider a resolution. Closing statements have started 3:27 p.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Closing statements are being given by Schiff and Nunes. Welch offers an invitation 3 p.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Rep. Peter Welch, D-Vermont, has a suggestion for a witness in the hearings Ukrainian support  Subpoena the whistleblower 3:50 p.m. Nov. 13, 2019: A resolution to subpoena the whistleblower to testify was made, but defeated by the Democrats on the committee. Ukraine support 2:45 p.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Rep. Will Hurd, R-Texas, is making the point that Ukraine received support from the Trump administration in 2017 and 2018. Never Trumpers? 2:30 p.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Rep. Eric Swalwell asks Kent and Taylor if they are 'never Trumpers,' people who will do anything to stop Trump from being reelected. Both said no. ‘Welcome to year four’ 2:15 p.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Republican representative Chris Stewart begins his questioning by welcoming Americans to “year four of the impeachment of President Trump.” Turner: It’s hearsay 2:01 p.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Rep. Mike Turner, R-Ohio, in a combative confrontation, says Kent and Taylor’s testimony is the result of hearsay. Turner's questioning turned testy.  “So you both know that this impeachment inquiry is about the United States, don’t you — the man that neither one of you have had any contact with?” Turner asked. 'Isn’t it true, possible, that the things that you heard were not true?” Turner asked Taylor. Taylor responded, “I’m here to tell you what I know, I’m not going to tell you anything that I don’t know.” “But since you learned it from others, you could be wrong?” Turner continued. “They could be wrong, or they could be mistaken, or they could have heard it incorrectly, right?” “People make mistakes, Taylor said. But was it impeachable? 1:50 p.m. ET Nov. 14, 2019: John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, asked Taylor and Kent whether they believed Trump had done anything impeachable. “I’m not here to do anything having to do with, to decide about impeachment,” Taylor said. “That is not what either of us are here to do. This is your job.” Is anyone defending Trump? 1:44 p.m. ET Nov. 14, 2019: Jim Himes, D-Connecticut, said, 'One of the things I find startling about these proceedings is that, faced with very serious allegations of presidential misconduct, my colleagues on the other side of the aisle don't engage or defend that conduct.' Like a ‘church prayer chain’ 1:40 p.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Jordan tries to show Taylor’s argument of quid pro quo relied on secondhand information alone. Taylor pushes back some, but acknowledges he did not listen to Trump’s Ukraine call or discuss any investigations into the Bidens with Zelensky. Jordan said of the passing the alleged information among several people, “I’ve seen church prayer chains that are easier to follow. My understanding is only coming from people I talked to.” Jim Jordan is asking questions 1:37 p.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, who was moved to the committee for this hearing, is questioning Taylor and Kent. Why weren’t they on the call? 1:20 p.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Castor asks both Kent and Taylor if either were on the July 25 phone call between Trump and Zelensky. Neither were. Castor asked why they weren't involved. Kent explains the process which he says is generally handled by the National Security Council. Castor asked Kent if Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman reached out to him prior to the call. Kent said he was notified the day before the call that would be taking place. 'And to the extent I had any role, it was to reach out to the embassy, give them the heads-up and ask them to ensure that the secure communications link in the office of the Ukraine was functional so the call could be patched through to the White House situation room,' Kent said.  What was Hunter Biden doing there? 1:12 p.m.ET Nov. 13, 2019: Republican counsel Castor asks Kent about Hunter Biden. He asks if Hunter Biden has a specific talent for business or speaks Ukrainian. He asks if either one knows if Hunter Biden moved to Ukraine since he was getting $50,000 a month from the Ukrainian energy company Barisma. ‘Facts not in evidence’12:50 p.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Schiff stops the questioning to warn Taylor that he does not have to answer a question that “assumes facts not in evidence” or hearsay. Republicans immediately go after Schiff for suggesting that the hearing be conducted as a criminal trial with respect to what is asked and answered, then there will be ample objections to questions Democrats ask in the coming hours if that is the case. 'I just want to be clear, ambassador, if you're able to verify the things that counsel has asked you in the prerequisite of the question, that's fine. Otherwise, in questions from the majority or the minority that assumes facts not in evidence before you, you should be cautioned about that,' Schiff said. Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, jumped in. 'Chairman, I sat here through the first 45 minutes and literally had an objection to almost the foundation of every question that Mr. Goldman (Democratic counsel Daniel Goldman) asked regarding facts not in evidence, leading,' he said. Hearing resumes 12:45 p.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: The hearing has resumed with Republican Rep. Devon Nunes asking questions. A brief recess 12:20 p.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: The hearing is in recess for five minutes. Who interfered? 12:14 p.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Goldman asks Kent: 'To your knowledge, is there any factual basis to support the allegation that Ukraine interfered in the 2016 election?' Kent answers, 'To my knowledge, there is no factual basis, no,' Kent said. Schiff, Daniel Goldman question Kent and Taylor 11:35 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Schiff asks Taylor about the staffer who overheard Trump asking about “investigations” in Ukraine. He asks if the staffer overheard the conversation between Sondland and Trump. Taylor said he did overhear a phone conversation. Goldman asks Taylor if he had ever seen such a situation as holding up military aid for a political favor. Taylor said no he had not. ‘In a public box’ 11:20 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: In his opening statement, Taylor said Gordon Sondland “told me that he now recognized that he had made a mistake by earlier telling Ukrainian officials that only a White House meeting with President Zelensky was dependent on a public announcement of investigations—in fact, Ambassador Sondland said, ‘everything’ was dependent on such an announcement, including security assistance.” Taylor went on to say “He (Sondland) said that President Trump wanted President Zelensky ‘in a public box’ by making a public statement about ordering such investigations” into the Bidens. Taylor: Staffer overheard Trump asking about ‘investigations’ 11:10 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: According to Taylor’s prepared remarks, one of his staffers was the one who overheard a phone call between Trump and US ambassador to the EU Gordon Sondland. He said the staffer heard that the president asked about the “investigations.” Sondland told the staffer, Taylor said, that Trump cared more about an investigation into Joe and Hunter Biden than other US-Ukrainian policies. Taylor said he was not aware of the conversation when he first testified before the committee. He said he wanted to clarify that in his opening statement. Taylor gives his opening statement 10:55 a.m. ET: Taylor testifies in his opening statement that withholding any help to Ukraine is a threat to U.S. security. He says, “I said on September 9 in a message to Ambassador Gordon Sondland that withholding security assistance in exchange for help with a domestic political campaign in the United States would be crazy I believed that then, and I still believe that.” Kent raised concerns about Hunter Biden 10:52 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Kent said he raised concerns in 2015 about the appearance of a conflict of interest in Hunter Biden’s work for Burisma, the Ukrainian energy company. “In February 2015, I raised my concern that Hunter Biden’s status as board member could create the perception of a conflict of interest,” Kent said. “Let me be clear; however, I did not witness any efforts by any U.S. official to shield Burisma from scrutiny.” No one should ask another country to investigate US issues 10:51 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Kent slams the president for asking for help in investigation Biden and his son. “U.S. efforts to counter corruption in Ukraine focus on building institutional capacity so that the Ukrainian government has the ability to go after corruption and effectively investigate, prosecute, and judge alleged criminal activities using appropriate institutional mechanisms -- that is -- to create and follow the rule of law. That means if there is any criminal nexus for activity in the United States, then U.S. law enforcement should pursue that case. If we think there has been some criminal act overseas that violates U.S. law, we have the institutional mechanisms to address that. It could be through the Justice Department and FBI agents assigned oversees or through treaty mechanisms, such as the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty. As a general principle, I do not believe the United States should ask other countries to engage in selective, politically associated investigations or prosecutions against opponents of those in power because such selective actions undermine the rule of law regardless of the country.” Kent’s opening statement 10:49 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Kent says in his opening statement that Ukraine is vital to U.S. security. “Support of Ukraine’s success also fits squarely into our strategy for central and Eastern Europe since the fall of the Wall 30 years ago this past week. A Europe truly whole, free, and at peace -- our strategic aim for the entirety of my foreign service career -- is not possible without a Ukraine whole, free, and at peace, including Crimea and Donbas, territories currently occupied by Russia.” Kent, Taylor sworn in 10:43 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Taylor and Kent are sworn in after Republicans ask when Schiff will give them an answer about witnesses they wish to call and about subpoenaing the whistleblower for a private hearing. Kent is giving his opening statement. Three questions 10:34 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Nunes says three questions need to be answered about the impeachment inquiry: Who did the whistleblower have contact with What is the full extent of Ukraine meddling against Trump in the 2016 election What did Hunter Biden do in Ukraine Nunes gives his opening statement 10:30 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Rep. Devon Nunes, the ranking member of the committee, gives his opening statement calling the hearing a “carefully orchestrated media smear campaign. He goes on to say Democrats have engaged in closed-door hearings in “a cult-like atmosphere in the basement of the nation’s Capitol, then said they staged the release of closed-door testimony. The impeachment inquiry is a “horrifically one-sided process.” “Notably,” Nunes said, “they are trying to impeach the president for inquiring about Hunter Biden’s activities, yet they will not honor the GOP’s request to have him appear.” Schiff says impeach is the only avenue 10:19 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Schiff continues to lay out what he says happened between Trump and officials in Ukraine and how Trump’s actions – asking for an investigation into Biden and his son in exchange for military aid to Ukraine – is a compelling argument to impeach him. Schiff is giving his opening statement 10:11 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Rep. Adam Schiff, chairman of the Intelligence Committee, is giving his opening statement. He says Rudy Giuliani, Trump's personal attorney, helped to set up a backchannel to advance 'the president's personal and professional' interests. He says the White House, lead by Mick Mulvaney and aided by Giuliani, ran a scheme to benefit the president by getting damaging information on former Vice President Joe Biden's son Hunter.  Kent, Taylor in the room; hearing starts 10:05 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Kent and Taylor are seated and Schiff is opening the hearing. People are filing into the hearing room 10 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: The hearing was set to begin at 10 a.m. Representatives, the press and spectators are getting to their seats now. Who is Stephen Castor? 9:55 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Stephen Castor is the Republican staff member who will be questioning Taylor and Kent. He has been an investigator in GOP inquiries into Operation Fast and Furious, the terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya and the government’s response to Hurricane Katrina. Who is Daniel Goldman? 9:53 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: The man who will ask questions for the Democrats was an assistant U.S. attorney in the Southern District of New York. He prosecuted mobsters and insider traders. More hearings announced 9:33 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: House Democrats have announced that eight witnesses will testify over three days next week. On Tuesday, Alexander Vindman; Kurt Volker; Jennifer Williams, a special adviser to Vice President Mike Pence on Europe and Russia; and Tim Morrison, a former White House national security aide will testify. On Nov. 20 Gordon Sondland; Laura Cooper, the Pentagon official who oversees Ukraine policy; and David Hale, the State Department’s third-ranking official, will appear before the Intelligence Committee. On Nov. 21, Fiona Hill, who was a White House Russia adviser, will testify. Kent arrives at the Capitol 9:24 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: George Kent, wearing a bow tie, has arrived at the Capitol. Both he and Taylor received subpoenas to testify last night, according to reports. Taylor arrives at the Capitol 9:15 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: William Taylor has arrived at the Capitol for the hearing. GOP witnesses 9:13 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Of the eight named witnesses the Republicans have asked to be called to testify in public hearings, only three -- Kurt Volker, David Hale and Tim Morrison -- have been okayed by Schiff. Schiff did not agree to let Hunter Biden, Joe Biden's son, testify. Will Trump be watching? 8:50 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: The first televised hearing in the impeachment investigation of Trump’s dealings with Ukraine will begin at 10 a.m. with the questioning of Taylor and Kent. Trump on Tuesday said the impeachment inquiry efforts “are going nowhere” when he spoke at an event in New York City Tuesday night. The White House has said the president may watch some of the hearings Wednesday. Live updates are beginning 8:30 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: Good morning! Welcome to live updates of the first public hearings in the impeachment inquiry. We will be following all the testimony from today’s proceedings. Hearing begins at 10 a.m. 6:33 a.m. ET Nov. 13, 2019: The hearing is set to begin at 10 a.m. ET. Live updates will begin at 8:30 a.m. ET
  • On World Kindness Day 2019, there is another incentive to be nice — it could help you live longer. >> Read more trending news  “(Being kind) helps the immune system, blood pressure; it helps people to live longer and better,” Kelli Harding of Columbia University in New York, who penned the book, “The Rabbit Effect,” told the BBC. “It's pretty amazing because there's an ample supply and you can't overdose on it.” Daniel Fessler, with the University of California LA’s Bedari Kindness Institute, agreed, calling kindness “therapeutic,” and saying acts of kindness can treat depression and anxiety, according to Yahoo News. Researchers at the University of British Columbia tested this idea by asking part of a group of 140 people with social anxiety to perform acts of kindness for four weeks. When the month was up, those participants who showed kindness “were significantly more likely to report relationship satisfaction, as well as being less likely to avoid social situations.” In addition to relieving depression and anxiety, scientists at Purdue University found those who volunteer have lower levels of the protein CRP, which is a marker of inflammation. Inflammation has been linked to everything from depression and dementia to heart disease and cancer. World Kindness Day, an international observance on Nov. 13, was introduced in 1998 by the World Kindness Movement with the goal of encouraging people around the world to show kindness to one another. On Twitter, #WorldKindnessDay quickly became a trending hashtag, with people and organizations offering ways to be kind.