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National

    The DeKalb County health department in metro Atlanta recently announced that a mosquito in the area tested positive for the deadly Eastern equine encephalitis virus. >> Read more trending news  “It’s a very serious illness if it is to infect a person,” Ryan Cira, the environmental health director for the DeKalb Board of Health, told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, though humans are rarely infected by the virus. >> Related: Mosquito tests positive for Eastern equine encephalitis in DeKalb Here’s what you need to know about EEE: What is it? The rare and deadly disease is caused by a virus spread via infected mosquitoes. It can lead to encephalitis or inflammation of the brain. >> Related: Tick, mosquito and flea infections in US more than triple since 2004, CDC warns How rare is it really? Cases of EEE are typically reported around Atlantic and Gulf Coast states, including Florida. About 5-10 cases are reported annually, according to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How can someone become infected?The disease is transmitted via the bite of an infected mosquito. Symptoms of EEE usually appear after 4-10 days after the bite. What are some symptoms of EEE virus infection? Those suffering a severe infection may initially experience headache, chills, high fever, nausea and vomiting. However, the CDC warns, the illness can escalate to seizures, disorientation or coma. » RELATED: Expert advice to prevent mosquito bites What does treatment for EEE look like?Doctors may encourage supportive therapy, which features respiratory support and IV fluids, but there’s no effective anti-viral drug to treat EEE. How many infected people die of EEE?About one-third of patients who develop EEE die. Those who survive often suffer mild to severe brain damage, according to public health experts. Who’s most at risk of contracting the virus?Anyone who spends a lot of time outdoors, either working in woodland habitats or spending recreational time outside, is at increased risk because of greater exposure to mosquitoes. >> Related: Mosquitoes in Georgia test positive for West Nile — What to know about the virus How common are mosquito-borne diseases in Georgia?According to a recent report from Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of Americans getting diseases transmitted by mosquito, tick and flea bites has more than tripled in recent years.In Georgia, according to the report, there were 1,420 mosquito-borne disease cases reported between 2004-2016.>> Related: Here’s why diseases caused by insects are becoming more prevalent What’s causing the increase? According to the CDC, there are multiple factors involved. Since overseas travel and commerce are more common than ever before, germs are increasingly spreading and moving into new regions.  “A traveler can be infected with a mosquito-borne disease, like Zika, in one country, and then unknowingly transport it home,” the CDC report stated. In addition to travel, new germs have also been discovered and added to the list of nationally notifiable diseases. >> Related: Rare tick-borne illness worries some medical professionals How to reduce your chances of getting infectedIt’s all about preventing mosquito bites. Here are some tips from the CDC: Use EPA-approved insect repellant (DEET, Picaridin, IR3535 and more) Grow these seven mosquito-repelling plants in your garden. Eliminate larval habitats in your yards, landscapes to reduce mosquito populations. Wear light-colored clothing. Wear long sleeves and long pants.
  • Three people were injured Wednesday morning when a man opened fire at an office building outside of Madison that houses software company WTS Paradigm, according to multiple reports. >> Read more trending news Officials said the shooter, who was not identified, was shot by police after they responded to reports of the shooting around 10:25 a.m. local time. He later died, a Middleton city official told WKOW. Update 3:10 p.m. EDT Sept. 19: Middleton police Chief Chuck Foulke confirmed Wednesday afternoon that the gunman, who has not been identified, died of his injuries, WISC-TV reported. Foulke said three other people were injured before police responded to the shooting Wednesday morning and engaged the suspect. Police are expected to provide additional information about the incident at a news conference scheduled to take place at 4 p.m. Update 2:30 p.m. EDT Sept. 19: Middleton police Chief Charles Foulke said the unidentified gunman who opened fire Wednesday morning at WTS Paradigm was among the four people injured in the attack. Foulke did not identify the shooter, who was confronted by police after they were called to the building around 10:25 a.m. “He was shot by officers and he is also at a local hospital,” Foulke said. “The main thing we can say right now is the suspect was neutralized, is at a local hospital, and that the public is no longer in danger from this incident.” The chief said police believe the injured gunman is the only suspect in Wednesday’s shooting. Authorities are expected to provide another update on the investigation at a news conference scheduled for 4 p.m. local time. Update 1:50 p.m. EDT Sept. 19: Judy Lahmers, who works as a business analyst at WTS Paradigm, told WITI that Wednesday morning’s shooting was “totally unexpected.” “We’re all software people,” she told the news station. “We have a good group.” She said she heard what sounded “like somebody was dropping boards on the ground, really loud,” on Wednesday morning and ran from the building. She took shelter behind a car, according to WITI. At some point, she said the glass door to the building shattered. “I’m not looking back, I’m running as fast as I can,” she told WITI. “You just wonder, do you hide or do you run?” Hospital and city officials said at least four people were injured in Wednesday morning shooting, although their conditions were not immediately known. Citing officials with the Madison School District, WKOW reported the suspected shooter was in custody after the incident. City Administrator Mike Davis told The Associated Press that the unidentified shooter was also injured. Update 1:35 p.m. EDT Sept. 19: City Administrator Mike Davis told The Associated Press that none of the four people injured in Wednesday’s shooting at the WTS Paradigm office in Middleton were fatally wounded. The extent of their injuries was not immediately known. Davis told the AP that the person suspected of opening fire Wednesday morning was also injured. A lockdown of the building where the shooting took place was lifted a few hours after the incident, according to the AP. Update 1:25 p.m. EDT Sept. 19: A person has been taken into custody after a reported shooting at a Wisconsin office building, WKOW reported, citing a letter from the Madison School District. 'I have confirmed with the Madison Police Department that the shooter has been taken into custody,' Joseph Balles, the coordinator of school safety and security for the school district, said in the letter, according to WKOW. 'Police are still searching this particular building for any other threats.' Police confirmed few details in the immediate aftermath of the shooting, which was reported around 10:25 a.m. local time. At least four people were injured in the incident, UW Health officials told WISC-TV. Police have not commented on any injuries associated with the shooting. Update 1:10 p.m. EDT Sept. 19: Officials with Wisconsin’s UW Health told WISC-TV that four people were taken to the hospital after a reported shooting at an office building on Deming Way. Their conditions were not immediately known. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported earlier Wednesday that the shooting took place at the office for Esker Software, however, the company’s director of sales, Dan Reeve, told WISC-TV that the shooting happened next door. The shooting took place at the offices for software company WTS Paradigm, according to witnesses. Police have not confirmed any injury reports. Officials continue to investigate. Original report: In a notice posted around 11:15 a.m. local time on Nixle, Middleton police warned that they were responding to “an active shooter in the 1800 block of Deming Way.” They asked people in the area to lock their doors, stay inside and shelter in place “until further notice.” Officials with the Dane County Communications Center confirmed to WGBA that officials were called around 10:25 a.m. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported that the shooting allegedly took place at an office building on Deming Way that houses Esker Software and other companies. Few details were immediately available on the incident. Officials with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives said the agency was also responding to the report Wednesday. Authorities continue to investigate. Check back for updates to this developing story.
  • A North Dakota man accused of helping to kill a pregnant woman tightened a rope around her neck after his girlfriend sliced the baby from the victim's womb, a prosecutor said Wednesday, later suggesting the girlfriend couldn't have restrained the mom-to-be alone. William Hoehn is charged with conspiracy to commit murder in the death of 22-year-old Savanna Greywind, who was eight months pregnant when she was killed in August 2017. Brooke Crews, who then lived with Hoehn, pleaded guilty last year in the killing and is serving life in prison without parole . Hoehn has said all along that he didn't know Crews had planned to kill Greywind. Hoehn initially told police he arrived home Aug. 19 to find Crews cleaning up blood in their bathroom. Hoehn said Crews presented him with an infant girl and said: 'This is our baby. This is our family.' Hoehn said he took garbage bags containing bloody shoes and his bloody towels and disposed of them away from the apartment complex. Defense attorney Daniel Borgen said in his 10-minute opening statement Wednesday that Greywind was already dead when Hoehn entered the bathroom. Hoehn then helped cover up the crime, Borgen said, noting that his client has confessed to that. 'He helped her. He shouldn't have,' Borgen said. 'He should have immediately called police.' But prosecutor Ryan Younggren said Crews couldn't have subdued Greywind without Hoehn's help. When Hoehn entered the bathroom, Crews told him that she wasn't sure if Greywind was dead. 'He goes and gets a rope, puts it around her neck, pulls it tight and says, 'If she's not dead, she is now,'' Younggren said in a 50-minute presentation Wednesday. Kayakers found Greywind's body in late August, wrapped in plastic and dumped in a river. It is still unclear how she ended up there. A medical examiner determined Greywind had bled to death. Crews and Greywind had been friends, and Greywind had texted her mother shortly before she disappeared to say she was going to Crews' apartment. After Greywind was reported missing, police searched Hoehn and Crews' apartment three times in six days but found no trace of blood. Crews originally told police that Greywind had given her the child. Crews later admitted they had argued, saying she pushed Greywind down and knocked her out before cutting her open. Greywind's death prompted North Dakota Sen. Heidi Heitkamp to introduce Savanna's Act, which aims to improve tribal access to federal crime information databases and create standardized protocols for responding to cases of missing and murdered Native American women . A similar bill has been introduced in the U.S. House. A judge said Hoehn's trial could last up to two weeks.
  • Agribusiness company Monsanto has asked a San Francisco judge to throw out a jury's $289 million award to a former school groundskeeper who said the company's Roundup weed killer left him dying of cancer. DeWayne Johnson failed to prove that Roundup or similar herbicides caused his non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and presented no evidence that Monsanto executives were malicious in marketing Roundup, attorneys for Monsanto said in court documents filed late Tuesday. Attorneys for Johnson had no immediate comment. Johnson's lawsuit is among hundreds alleging Roundup caused cancer, but it was the first one to go to trial. Johnson sprayed Roundup and a similar product, Ranger Pro, at his job as a pest control manager at a San Francisco Bay Area school district, according to his attorneys. He was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in 2014 at age 42. A San Francisco jury last month determined that Roundup contributed to Johnson's cancer, and Monsanto should have provided a label warning of a potential health hazard. It awarded Johnson $39 million in compensatory damages and $250 million in punitive damages. Johnson's attorneys have said the jury verdict would bolster the other Roundup lawsuits. Many government regulators have rejected a link between the active ingredient in Roundup — glyphosate — and cancer. Monsanto has vehemently denied such a connection, saying hundreds of studies have established that glyphosate is safe. 'While we are sympathetic to Mr. Johnson and his family, glyphosate is not responsible for his illness, and the verdict in this case should be reversed or set aside,' Bayer AG, which acquired Monsanto in June, said in a statement. The court documents filed Tuesday ask San Francisco Superior Court Judge Suzanne Bolanos to override the jury's decision and enter judgment in favor of Monsanto or order a new trial. Bolanos also has the authority to reduce the award. Glyphosate came under increasing scrutiny after the France-based International Agency for Research on Cancer, which is part of the World Health Organization, classified it as a 'probable human carcinogen' in 2015. A flurry of lawsuits against Monsanto in federal and state courts followed, and California added glyphosate to its list of chemicals known to cause cancer. Monsanto has attacked the international research agency's opinion as an outlier. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says glyphosate is safe for humans when used in accordance with label directions.
  • If the rumors prove true, Maroon 5 will take the stage at halftime at the 2019 Super Bowl. >> Read more trending news  NFL sources haven’t confirmed the news reported by Variety that the Adam Levine-fronted outfit will play Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta on Feb. 3, 2019. In a statement, the NFL said it continues to work with sponsor Pepsi on halftime plans but there were no official announcements at this time. >>AJC Super Bowl guide If Maroon 5 is indeed the centerpiece attraction for the Super Bowl, fans might see surprise appearances by current collaborator Cardi B (“I Like It”) and Kendrick Lamar (“Don’t Wanna Know”), along with selections from the band’s trove of hits, including “Moves Like Jagger,” “This Love” and “Makes Me Wonder,” the Atlanta Journal-Constitution noted.
  • A Wisconsin woman who vanished after moving to Colorado with her boyfriend remains missing, and her family and friends are worried that her final text messages indicate she’s met with foul play. Erin Vandewiele, 40, of Menomonie, was last heard from July 23, less than a month after she arrived in Denver. Her boyfriend, Joseph Scott Mayer, 41, has since been arrested on outstanding warrants and extradited back to Wisconsin, where jail records show he is being held in the Dunn County Jail. Mandi Schmidt, Vandewiele’s sister, told ABC7 in Denver that those who know Vandewiele are worried, particularly because the missing woman said in texts and telephone conversations before her disappearance that she was worried Mayer would hurt her.  “He’s gonna kill me if I don’t get away from him today,” Vandewiele wrote in one text, according to the news station.  “I feel like something is terribly wrong,” friend Stacy Morris told ABC7. “We’re pretty much worried that she might be dead and that she’s not going to be able to come home to her kids and her sister.” Schmidt said her sister’s driver’s license and Social Security card were found on a bus in Denver. Vandewiele sent her sister a selfie taken near Union Station.  The rest of Vandewiele’s belongings were found in a motel room in Denver, according to WQOW in Eau Clair, Wisconsin.  >> Read more trending news Schmidt told the Wisconsin news station that Vandewiele spoke to a friend over the phone on July 23 and said she would call the following day -- if she was still alive. Vandewiele, who suffers from anxiety and depression, also said she was scared for her life and that she never should have gone to Colorado with Mayer, the news station reported.  “I guess we have no reason to believe that there was any foul play,” Dunn County Sheriff Dennis Smith told WQOW. “But, we don’t have any reason to believe that there wasn’t any foul play.” The Denver Police Department is leading the investigation into Vandewiele’s disappearance. Denver police officials describe her as 5 feet, 5 inches tall and weighing about 120 pounds.  Vandewiele has brown eyes and long brown hair. She also has a tattoo on her forearm that reads, “I do what I want.” Anyone with information on her whereabouts should call Denver investigators at 720-913-7867. 
  • A rollover crash on a California highway Tuesday that led to a child being ejected and suffering major injuries could have been prevented, officials said. >> Read more trending news  On its Facebook page, the California Highway Patrol office in Santa Cruz posted a photo from the accident, which shows a large debris field along the median. CHP said that a distracted driver crashed into the median, causing a 5-year-old boy, who was not properly secured in a safety seat, to be ejected from the vehicle. The boy suffered major injuries and was airlifted to a trauma center, CHP said. Officials said, 'Tragically, this child could have been uninjured if he were in the proper seat.' The CHP warned parents: “Don’t assume a seat belt will restrain a child who is not at least 4 feet, 9 inches tall.' Officers found the boy's mangled seat belt, still buckled, in the vehicle, but no booster seat was found, KSBW reported.  'It was an absolutely awful, traumatic scene,' CHP Officer Sam Courtney told KSBW, saying that the boy was ejected from the vehicle as soon as it began to roll over. The mother, identified by Highway Patrol as a 40-year-old woman from Watsonville, was treated for moderate injuries. Authorities are looking into possible criminal charges in the case. The CHP hopes the accident will be a sober reminder for other parents. On Facebook, the CHP said that it provides car seats free of charge and will help properly install them.
  • The Latest on report of active shooter at a commercial building in a suburb of Madison, Wisconsin (all times local): 1:50 p.m. Officials say the suspect in a Wisconsin workplace shooting has died after being shot by police. Middleton Police Chief Chuck Foulke says there are no other suspects in the attack that occurred Wednesday morning at software company WTS Paradigm. Foulke says the suspect died after being shot by officers. Foulke says three other people were wounded during the attack. City Administrator Mike Davis initially said four people were injured during the shooting, but he and Foulke said the correct number is three, not including the suspect. Foulke says officers were alerted to an active shooter situation at about 10:25 a.m. He didn't release details about the suspect or how the attack unfolded. He says officers are still interviewing witnesses. ___ 1:15 p.m. Police in southeast Wisconsin are conducting a secondary search of an office building where four people were shot to make sure there are no additional victims or suspects. Middleton police dispatcher Danielle Kimball says officers are still finding people who've been hiding since the Wednesday morning shooting at software company WTS Paradigm. City Administrator Mike Davis says four people were wounded when the shooter opened fire around 10 a.m. Davis says the fifth person, believed to be the shooter, was also critically injured. Davis didn't elaborate. Details about how the shooting unfolded haven't been released. University Hospital in nearby Madison says it's treating four patients from the shooting. Two were in serious condition and one was critical. The condition of the fourth patient wasn't released. St. Mary's Hospital says it's treating another patient for injuries that aren't life-threatening. __ 12:20 p.m. A city official says four people have been shot, but none fatally, during a shooting at a software company near Madison, Wisconsin. The shooting occurred Wednesday morning in Middleton. City Administrator Mike Davis says the suspected shooter was also injured. Their conditions weren't immediately known. The shooting was reported around 10 a.m. at WTS Paradigm. Davis says police have lifted a lockdown A hospital spokeswoman says four people are being treated at University Hospital in Middleton. ___ 12 p.m. An employee at a Wisconsin business where a shooting took place says she ran for her life after hearing 'really loud' shots. Judy Lahmers is a business analyst at WTS Paradigm in the Madison suburb of Middleton. She says she didn't know whether to run or hide when she heard shots about 10 a.m. Wednesday. She says she ran out of the building and hid behind a car. Lahmers says she knows one co-worker was grazed by a shot but was OK. She didn't know the extent of the shooting. Police haven't released details but numerous ambulances are at the scene . Lahmers says the shooting was 'totally unexpected.' She said: 'We're all software people. We have a good group.' Another company, Esker, is next door. Esker employee Gabe Geib says he heard a couple of shots but didn't immediately know what it was. He says he then saw numerous people running away from the building in 'full sprint.' He says he and his colleagues were still huddled in their cafeteria, away from windows, more than an hour after the shooting. ___ 11:40 a.m. Police and ambulances have converged on a commercial building where an active shooter has been reported in a suburb of Madison, Wisconsin. The Wisconsin State Journal reports the Dane County 911 communications center said the shooter was at an address Wednesday that includes companies Esker Software and WTS Paradigm. A State Journal reporter at the scene says at least 40 police squad cars and ambulances are outside the building. Police have set up a perimeter around the building. The Greenway Station shopping center next door to the office building is on lockdown. There are stores and restaurants affected. ___ 11:10 a.m. Police are responding to a report of an active shooter at a commercial building in a suburb of Madison, Wisconsin. The State Journal reports that the Dane County dispatch center said shots have been fired at Esker Software in Middleton. Police and multiple ambulances have responded. Dane County Sheriff's Department spokeswoman Elise Schaffer confirmed there is an 'active shooter situation' and that the office is assisting Middleton Police with the response. She provided no additional information. Middleton is about 90 miles (145 kilometers) west of Milwaukee.
  • The Latest on the release of a woman who helped kidnap Elizabeth Smart in Utah (all times local): 12:30 p.m. The lawyer for a woman who helped kidnap Elizabeth Smart in Utah says it's unfair to call her a threat now that she's been released from prison. Attorney Scott Williams made the comment Wednesday after Smart's father said he is concerned that 72-year-old Wanda Barzee remains capable of abusing another child. Barzee was released from a Utah prison after serving 15 years in the 2002 kidnapping of Elizabeth Smart, then 14. Williams told reporters there's no reliable evidence that Barzee will be dangerous. He says she wants to be left alone and will comply with the conditions of her supervised release. He said he's concerned about her safety but did not elaborate. Under the terms of her release, Barzee must undergo mental health treatment and not contact Smart and her family. ___ 11:10 a.m. Elizabeth Smart's father says he's grateful that one of her kidnappers will be watched closely by federal agents now that she's been freed from prison, but he remains concerned about Wanda Barzee's mental state. Ed Smart said Wednesday that he's heard reports that Barzee still believes in the teachings of David Brian Mitchell, the street preacher who took the teenage Elizabeth Smart from her bedroom at knifepoint in 2002. Ed Smart says Mitchell's so-called divine revelations prompted Barzee to help kidnap the girl and even sit next to her as Mitchell raped her. He fears Barzee remains capable of abusing another child. Barzee will be on federal supervised release for five years and is now a registered sex offender. Under the terms of her release, she must undergo mental health treatment and not contact Smart and her family. Mitchell is serving a life prison sentence. ___ 10 a.m. One of Elizabeth Smart's kidnappers has been placed on the Utah sex offender registry after her release from prison. The online registry shows Wanda Barzee's conviction on federal and state charges in the 2002 kidnapping of then 14-year-old Smart. The registry shows the addresses of convicted Utah sex offenders and is a condition of Barzee's release. Barzee's registration shows her address as the Utah State Prison in Draper, outside Salt Lake City. Prison and probation officials did not immediately respond to email and phone messages seeking comment on when her address outside prison would be listed on the site. She was released Wednesday morning after 15 years in custody. Federal agents overseeing her five years on supervised release have said she will have a place to live, but haven't released specific information. She pleaded guilty to helping her husband, street preacher Brian David Mitchell, who took Smart from her bedroom at knifepoint. 9:25 a.m. A woman who helped kidnap Elizabeth Smart when she was a teenager has been released from a Utah prison after 15 years in custody. Utah State prison spokeswoman Kaitlin Felsted said in a statement that Wanda Barzee was released Wednesday following a surprise announcement last week that authorities had miscalculated the amount of time she should serve. The 72-year-old was previously scheduled to be released in 2024. Barzee was not seen by reporters leaving the prison in the Salt Lake City suburb of Draper. She will be under federal supervision for five years. Smart, now 30, is shocked Barzee is being released and said she hopes she will be closely watched and given treatment. Smart says that during her nine-month abduction in 2002 and 2003, Barzee would encourage her street-preacher husband to rape her. 6:50 a.m. Elizabeth Smart says the woman who helped kidnap her when she was 14 and stood by as she was sexually assaulted fell short on her court-ordered apology. Part of Wanda Barzee's plea deal was a requirement that she write an apology, Smart said in an interview aired Wednesday on 'CBS This Morning.' Barzee is expected to be freed Wednesday after 15 years in custody because Utah authorities had miscalculated the amount of time the 72-year-old woman should serve. In the interview, Smart also stressed that victims like herself shouldn't be blamed, tempting though it may be.
  • It is uncertain on Wednesday if a face-off between Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and a woman who has accused him of sexual assault when the two were teenagers will take place early next week. If it does happen, it won’t be the first time a nominee to the Supreme Court will hear a woman say publicly that he acted inappropriately. Professor Christine Blasey Ford has accused Kavanaugh of trying to assault her when the two were at a party in the early 1980s. They were both in high school and Ford said Kavanaugh was “stumbling drunk” on the night he allegedly groped her and tried to take off her clothes. In 1991, a special hearing was convened by the Senate Judiciary after a woman accused then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas of sexual harassment in the workplace.  Here’s what happened in the Thomas hearing. A new nominee On June 28, 1991, Justice Thurgood Marshall announced his retirement from the U.S. Supreme Court. Marshall, the first African-American to be appointed to the court, had served for 24 years and was in failing health. Three days later, on July 1, President George W. Bush nominated Clarence Thomas, a 43-year-old, African-American from Pin Point, Georgia, to replace Marshall.  In the weeks that followed, Thomas’ nomination would become a point of contention with women’s groups railing against Thomas’ views on abortion, civil rights groups opposing his calls for the end of affirmative action and legal organizations upset over Thomas’ lack of experience – he had been a federal judge for just two years. The confirmation process Following Bush’s announcement, Thomas met with senators on the Judicial Committee, which was headed by Sen. Joe Biden, (D-Delaware). Thomas’ confirmation hearing began on Sept.10.  During the hearings, Thomas was questioned about his view on Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion in the United States. Thomas said he had not formulated an opinion on the case, sparking more protest. He was asked whether he thought the Constitution held that people had property rights and if he opposed affirmative action. On Sept. 27, the Judiciary Committee held two votes. The first was on whether to forward his nomination to the full Senate with a recommendation of support. The vote on that motion ended in a 7-7 tie with Minnesota Sen. Herb Kohl being the only Democrat to vote for Thomas. The second vote was to send Thomas’ nomination to the full Senate without a recommendation – meaning the committee was neither supporting nor opposing the nomination. That vote passed. Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell, (D-Maine), set Oct. 8 as the date for a vote on Thomas’ confirmation. Rumors of a bombshell to come On Oct. 5, reports began to circulate about a confidential statement that had been made to the Judicial Committee on Sept. 23. The story, set to be published that next day in Newsday, said that someone who had worked for Thomas at the Department of Education and at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission was claiming he had sexually harassed her. The information, the story would say, was leaked to several reporters.  One of those reporters, NPR's Supreme Court correspondent Nina Totenberg, would air the story about Anita Hill’s accusation on the same morning that Newsday’s story came out. She reported that she learned of Hill’s claims when she was given a leaked Judiciary Committee/FBI report. According to the story, Hill, a law professor at the University of Oklahoma, told the committee that Thomas had repeatedly asked her out on dates, described his sexual interests to her and had insisted on describing to her the plots of pornographic movies he had seen. She also said Thomas had talked about lurid sexual situations and bragged about his own sexual prowess. On Oct. 6, Hill held a press conference in Oklahoma accusing Thomas of harassment publicly. The Judiciary Committee decided on that day, two days before the scheduled Senate vote on Thomas’ nomination, to hold public hearings on Hill’s claims.  A special hearing grabs the nation’s attention On Oct. 11, an estimated 20 million people tuned their TV sets into the Judiciary Committee hearing to watch as Hill spelled out in sometimes graphic detail a story of continued sexually harassment by her then-boss, Thomas. “During this period at the Department of Education, my working relationship with Judge Thomas was positive. I had a good deal of responsibility and independence. I thought he respected my work and that he trusted my judgment,” Hill said. “After approximately three months of working there, he asked me to go out socially with him. What happened next, and telling the world about it, are the two most difficult things-experiences of my life. …“I declined the invitation to go out socially with him and explained to him that I thought it would jeopardize at -what at the time I considered to be a very good working relationship. I had a normal social life with other men outside the office. I believed then, as now, that having a social relationship with a person who was supervising my work would be ill-advised. I was very uncomfortable with the idea and told him so. “I thought that by saying no and explaining my reasons, my employer would abandon his social suggestions. However, to my regret, in the following few weeks, he continued to ask me out on several occasions. “He pressed me to justify my reasons for saying no to him. These incidents took place in his office or mine. They were in the form of private conversations, which not-would not have been overheard by anyone else.” Hill was asked if she was only trying to get revenge after being spurned by Thomas and questioned about claims she was delusional when it came to the accusations about Thomas.  Thomas fires back at the committee After Hill testified, Thomas appeared again before the committee. In his opening statement, after Biden had characterized the hearing as a chance to address “difficult matters,” Thomas said he wanted to appear before the committee to clear his name, then went on to call the hearing a “circus.” Thomas slammed committee members for even holding the hearing and likened it to a lynching. “This is not an opportunity to talk about difficult matters privately or in a closed environment. This is a circus. It's a national disgrace. And from my standpoint, as a black American, it is a high-tech lynching for uppity blacks who in any way deign to think for themselves, to do for themselves, to have different ideas, and it is a message that unless you kowtow to an old order, this is what will happen to you. You will be lynched, destroyed, caricatured by a committee of the U.S. Senate rather than hung from a tree.” The next two days, Saturday and Sunday, supporters of both Hill and Thomas testified before the committee. The vote On Tuesday, Oct. 15, the Senate confirmed Thomas on a vote of 52 to 48. Forty-one Republicans and 11 Democrats voted to confirm Thomas’ nomination. Forty-six Democrats and two Republicans voted against the nomination. Five sitting senators took part in the full Senate vote in 1991 – Patrick Leahy, (D-Vermont), Orrin Hatch, (R-Utah), Charles Grassley, (R-Iowa), Richard Shelby, (R-Alabama), and Mitch McConnell, (R-Kentucky). Three of those senators – Leahy, Hatch and Grassley – were on the Judiciary Committee when Thomas’ hearings were taking place. All three are on the committee now, 27 years later. What happened after the special hearing? The Judiciary Committee did not change its recommendation to the full Senate, and Thomas was sworn in as an associate justice of the Supreme Court on Oct. 23,1991. He continues to serve to this day.  He addressed the hearing in an autobiography in 2007, “My Grandfather’s Son,” saying Hill was his 'most traitorous adversary.”  In his book, he wrote of Hill, “On Sunday morning, courtesy of Newsday, I met for the first time an Anita Hill who bore little resemblance to the woman who had worked for me at EEOC and the Education Department. Somewhere along the line, she had been transformed into a conservative, devoutly religious Reagan-administration employee. In fact, she was a left-winger who'd never expressed any religious sentiments whatsoever during the time I'd known her, and the only reason why she'd held a job in the Reagan administration was because I'd given it to her.” Hill resumed teaching to the University of Oklahoma College of Law, where she faced scorn from some university officials who tried to have her tenure revoked. She left the school five years later and took a position at the University of California, Berkeley in January 1997. She left Berkeley for a position at Brandeis University.  In 2011, she also took a position with the law firm of Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll. She is the chairman for the Commission on Eliminating Sexual Harassment and Advancing Inclusion, and is on the board of directors for the National Women's Law Center, and the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights in Boston. She is also on the board of trustees for Southern Vermont College and the board of governors for Tufts Medical Center.  Hill has received numerous awards and honorary degrees. In 1998, she wrote her autobiography, “Speaking Truth to Power.” In the book, she wrote about her testimony and addressed a question many had asked her at the time – why she had not come forward earlier. “I assessed the situation and chose not to file a complaint,” Hill wrote. “I had every right to make that choice.  And until society is willing to accept the validity of claims of harassment, no matter how privileged or powerful the harasser, it is a choice women will continue to make.”  A book written by David Brock in 1992 called “The Real Anita Hill” claimed that Hill was obsessed with Thomas and had lied during her testimony. Brock would later recant his statements and denounce the book as “character assassination.” He apologized to Hill.