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Local Education

    Fulton County Schools will give families the choice to either send their children to school or to learn online at home. The district also will delay the start of the 2020-2021 school year. The board on Monday unanimously agreed to move the first day of school from Aug. 10 to Aug. 17. That will give teachers and staff more time to make preparations amid the coronavirus pandemic.  The Fulton school system is Georgia’s fourth largest school district, with more than 93,500 students. Parents have been closely watching the reopening decision after the coronavirus forced school buildings to close in mid-March.  Superintendent Mike Looney outlined his current thinking during Monday’s board meeting. He said the district plans to open schools for in-person instruction but also allow students from first through 12th grades to enroll in full-time virtual instruction.  Pre-kindergarten and kindergarten classes will only be offered in an in-person setting.  “Everything that we are communicating today is our intent as of today, but it’s completely dependent on what the data says when it’s our turn to turn the first school bell on,” Looney said.  Online registration for the virtual model will be open Tuesday through July 17.  Initially, district officials had planned to require high school students who pick the online option to leave their school and enroll at one of the district’s two alternative high schools.  But on Monday, after hearing feedback from parents, officials said online students could remain enrolled at their high school and register for a program offered through one of the district’s alternative schools. >>Read MORE on AJC.com.
  • My paternal grandmother, Mary L. Crane, imbued in me at a young age an attitude towards life which has always served me well. If you start each day willing to learn something new, you probably will.
  • The COVID-19 restrictions Governor Brian Kemp enacted with the shelter in place order for any residents or visitors to Georgia over age 65 has been lifted. That may contribute to more family gatherings for weekend social events, and increased travel on state roadways. Expect increased surface street volume and expressway travel, as the weekend will also provide ideal weather for some (restricted) outdoor activities.
  • Emory University announced Thursday plans for how it will conduct classes for the fall semester when it will return to in-person instruction. Plans include limiting how many students can reside in dorms, mandatory COVID-19 testing of students in those dorms and those taking in-person classes, and concluding the semester by Thanksgiving. The plans also include random temperature checks across campus each day by trained university staff and setting limits on most in-person, large lectures to minimize class sizes. The fall semester will begin Aug. 19 and finals will be conducted remotely. “COVID-19 testing will be mandatory for all students living in residence halls, along with those taking in-person classes, upon or shortly before returning to campus, and will be available at any time during the semester for those who are symptomatic and for their close contacts. Faculty and staff will have access to testing on demand,” Emory said on its website. Read more at AJC.com.
  • The cases against three murder suspects have been bound over to Superior Court after an all-day hearing in Glynn County. The three men accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery are scheduled for probable cause hearings in Brunswick today amid nationwide protests over the killing of another unarmed black man — George Floyd — in Minneapolis.  Travis and Greg McMichael and William “Roddie” Bryan have each been charged with felony murder in the Arbery case, which has drawn national attention and sparked demonstrations. Because of concerns surrounding the coronavirus pandemic, the McMichaels and Bryan will appear by video for their hearings from the Glynn County Detention Center.  Read more on this story at www.ajc.com. 
  • ABC news coverage of the memorial service for George Floyd.WATCH LIVE
  • WATCH LIVE: Gov. Brian Kemp holds a press conference to address #coronavirus updates as well as recent protests:
  • Vice President Mike Pence is in Atlanta to meet with Gov. Brian Kemp and gather with restaurant executives to discuss the state's aggressive approach to reopening the economy during the coronavirus pandemic.Vice
  • Gov. Brian Kemp gives an update on the state's response to coronavirus. This comes just a day after the state was counting antibody test results in with regular test results by the tune of about 57,000. WATCH LIVE BELOW>>> Gov. Brian Kemp gives an update on the state's response to coronavirus. 
  • The system that runs Georgia’s 22 technical colleges introduced a plan to its board Wednesday that proposes furloughs and layoffs to meet the state government’s demand to cut its budget by 14% for the 12-month fiscal year that starts July 1. The plan does not specify how many employees would be laid off. The system said it still in the process of evaluating to determine an exact number. Regarding furloughs, the system is planning a tiered approach that includes up to 12 days. The furloughs would begin July 1. The system’s commissioner, Greg Dozier, would participate in the furlough plan, a spokesman said. State officials earlier this month asked all departments and agencies to come up with the 14% cuts in response to revenue declines created by the coronavirus pandemic. The proposed 14% cuts total $52.3 million across the technical college system, with more than $46 million coming from general education programs and the rest from its adult education budget, administrative costs and other programs. > RELATED: Furloughs likely, again, as part of Georgia agencies’ budget cut plan Dozier told board members that some educational programs being done on multiple campuses would be consolidated, such as auto collision or fire services. Some adult education programs would have more students and more classes would be taught online. The system has metro Atlanta colleges in Cobb, DeKalb and Gwinnett counties and the city of Atlanta.