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    Georgia officials say a woman was raped and spotted her attacker years later at a train station, leading to his arrest and conviction. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported Monday that 54-year-old Antonio White was convicted of rape Friday and sentenced to life in prison. Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard says the woman recognized White in 2013 while waiting at a commuter train station. Howard says the woman began screaming that White had previously raped her, prompting his arrest. Prosecutors say White offered the woman a ride home in 2007. They say the woman knew White and accepted. Prosecutors say he then raped her at gunpoint inside the car. White has a history of sexual assault, including a rape conviction in another case and a guilty plea to sexual battery. ___ Information from: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, http://www.ajc.com
  • The Georgia Historical Society in Savannah marked the anniversary of the adoption of the U.S. Constitution by displaying a draft copy. Monday marked the 231st anniversary of the adoption. The historical society's copy was that of Abraham Baldwin, a delegate from Georgia to the Constitutional Convention of 1787. The Savannah Morning News reports that Baldwin's draft is one of 13 surviving copies. It includes handwritten margin notes Baldwin made at the convention. Typically, the document is kept under lock and key in the GHS Research Archive to protect against humidity. The draft has been in the GHS collection since the 19th century. GHS Senior Historian Stan Deaton said nobody knows how it got there — adding that Baldwin had no connection to Savannah. ___ Information from: Savannah Morning News, http://www.savannahnow.com
  • A federal judge said forcing Georgia to scrap its electronic voting machines in favor of paper ballots for the upcoming midterm elections is too risky, though she said the state needs to move quickly to address concerns about the security of the machines and its elections system. U.S. District Judge Amy Totenberg's Monday ruling means the state won't have to use paper ballots for this year's midterm elections, including a high-profile gubernatorial contest between the state's top elections official, Republican Secretary of State Brian Kemp, and Democrat Stacey Abrams, a former state House minority leader who's trying to become the country's first black, female governor. Totenberg said the voting rights advocates who sought the change to paper ballots have demonstrated 'the threat of real harms to their constitutional interests,' but that she worried about the 'massive scrambling' required for a last-minute change to paper ballots. Early voting starts Oct. 15 for the Nov. 6 midterm elections. 'Ultimately, any chaos or problems that arise in connection with a sudden rollout of a paper ballot system with accompanying scanning equipment may swamp the polls with work and voters — and result in voter frustration and disaffection from the voting process,' she wrote. 'There is nothing like bureaucratic confusion and long lines to sour a citizen.' Voting integrity advocates had sued state and county election officials, arguing that the touchscreen voting machines Georgia has used since 2002 are vulnerable to hacking and provide no way to confirm that votes have been recorded correctly because there's no paper trail. They had sought an immediate change to paper ballots for the midterm elections while the case is pending. Coalition for Good Governance executive director Marilyn Marks and David Cross, a lawyer who represents a small group of voters, both noted that Totenberg found merit in their arguments and that they plan to continue fighting for a secure voting system. Both said they're reviewing the decision to decide whether to appeal. The case is being watched closely because Georgia is among five states, along with more than 300 counties in eight other states, that exclusively use touchscreen voting machines that provide no paper record, according to Verified Voting, a nonprofit group focused on ensuring the accuracy of elections. 'My view is that this ruling has huge national significance,' said Larry Schwartztol with Protect Democracy, which has brought a similar case in South Carolina. 'The court acknowledged that states violate the Constitution if they fail to provide an election system that can stand up to modern cyber-threats.' Totenberg chastised the state, saying it had been slow to respond to 'serious vulnerabilities of its voting system' as well as software and hardware issues that have long been evident and said 'further delay is not tolerable in their confronting and tackling the challenges before the State's election balloting system.' Kemp said in an emailed statement that the state will move forward 'to responsibly upgrade Georgia's secure — but aging — voting system.' The judge noted a general consensus among cybersecurity experts and federal officials about the insecurity of electronic voting machines with no paper record, specifically pointing to a Sept. 6 report from the National Academy of Sciences report that says all elections should be conducted with 'human-readable paper ballots' by 2020 with every effort made to use them in this year's general election. 'Advanced persistent threats in this data-driven world and ordinary hacking are unfortunately here to stay,' she wrote, adding that state elections officials 'will fail to address that reality if they demean as paranoia the research-based findings of national cybersecurity engineers and experts in the field of elections.' Kemp, who rejected federal offers of assistance with election system security in 2016, has conceded that the current machines should be replaced. He established a commission earlier this year to look into a change and last month called for proposals to implement a system with voter-verifiable paper records in time for the 2020 presidential election. But he and other election officials argued the machines are still secure and a last-minute change would be costly and cause chaos. In addition to worries about the machines, Totenberg seemed concerned that the state did not seriously address the impact of a breach of a state election server in its arguments. Security experts last year disclosed a gaping hole that exposed personal data for 6.7 million Georgia voters, as well as passwords used by county officials to access election-staging files. That hole still wasn't fixed six months after it was first reported to election authorities. Kemp's office blamed the Center for Elections Systems at Kennesaw State University that managed the system. But ultimately, it reported to his office. Less than a week after the lawsuit was filed in July 2017 demanding the touchscreen system be replaced, the server that had been accessed was wiped clean by staff at Kennesaw State. Kemp denied ordering the data destruction or knowing about it in advance.
  • Judge declines to order Georgia to scrap electronic voting machines that critics said are vulnerable to hacking.
  • The winning numbers in Monday evening's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's 'Cash 3 Night' game were: 7-5-5 (seven, five, five)
  • The winning numbers in Monday evening's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's 'Cash 4 Night' game were: 4-9-5-8 (four, nine, five, eight)
  • The winning numbers in Monday evening's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's 'Fantasy 5' game were: 12-20-23-28-33 (twelve, twenty, twenty-three, twenty-eight, thirty-three) Estimated jackpot: $125,000
  • A creepy, whiteface character from the FX hit series 'Atlanta' has been seated in the front row and taking selfies at the Emmy Awards. Teddy Perkins appeared Monday night at the Microsoft Theater in the same attire as worn on the comedy-drama on the show, sporting red velvet dinner jacket, heavy white makeup, prosthetics and a bob cut wig. The character was played by the show's star Donald Glover, but it's unclear whether the actor-singer dressed up as Perkins who became a main attraction in the crowd and social media taking selfies during commercial breaks. Perkins congratulated Bill Hader, who won an Emmy for best actor in a television comedy over Glover — last year's winner. Even Hader had no idea who was dressed up as Perkins. 'I don't know who it was, but I know it was that guy from 'Atlanta,'' Hader said backstage. When Glover was shown in the crowd, Perkins was not around. Perkins became one of the most intriguing figures during 'Atlanta's' second season because of his eerie appearance. The character tricked Darius, played by LaKeith Stanfield, into visiting his home.
  • Miles Mikolas has been unbeatable this season when the St. Louis Cardinals score him a couple of runs. He's 16-0 when getting at least two runs of support, a big asset for the Cardinals as they stay in the postseason hunt. 'I've been fortunate enough that when I've pitched, we've had great offense and we've put up runs and played great defense and everything has just come together,' Mikolas said. 'It's been a great season.' Kolten Wong hit the first of four St. Louis homers, Mikolas won his third straight start and the Cardinals beat the NL East-leading Atlanta Braves 11-6 on Monday night to give their playoff push another boost. St. Louis has 35 victories since the All-Star break, most in the National League, and has won two straight after losing four in a row. The Cardinals, who also got homers from Paul DeJong, Harrison Bader and Yadier Molina, are a half-game ahead of Colorado for the second NL wild card. The Braves took a third consecutive loss after winning a season-best six straight games. They remained 6½ games up in the division following Philadelphia's loss to the Mets, which reduced Atlanta's magic number to seven as the Braves try to clinch their first NL East title in five years. Mike Foltynewicz (11-10) walked three of the first five batters he faced — one intentionally — and hit Yadier Molina with a pitch before Wong's opposite-field, two-run single gave St. Louis a 3-0 lead in the first. Atlanta pitchers have issued 32 walks over the last four games, all at home, where they are 38-37 and have dropped 13 of their last 17. 'It just goes down to early on — the walks, the walks, the walks — they all score,' Braves manager Brian Snitker said. 'That's the big thing.' Mikolas (16-4) allowed four hits, two runs and one walk while striking out six in five innings. The right-hander, who leads the NL in fewest walks per nine innings, improved to 9-0 in 15 road starts. 'They fouled off some good pitches, but we played great defense, and I was able to get out of the jams when I was in a sticky situation,' he said. After Freddie Freeman's 22nd homer made it a one-run game in the third, the Cardinals went up 4-2 in the fourth on Wong's ninth homer and 6-2 in the fifth on DeJong's 18th homer and Marcell Ozuna's RBI double. St. Louis improved to an NL-best 40-19 when hitting a road homer. Foltynewicz allowed five hits, six runs and four walks with two strikeouts in 4 2/3 innings. Coming off a complete-game victory at San Francisco, Foltynewicz had gone 4-2 with a 1.84 ERA in his last eight starts, but he couldn't overcome a lack of control. Nick Markakis drove in a run with his NL-leading 42nd double, coming against Dakota Hudson in the seventh, to pull the Braves to 6-5. But then Jesse Biddle gave up a pair of two-out walks in the eighth, and Bader, a defensive replacement in the seventh, hit a three-run homer to put St. Louis up 9-5. The Braves had a chance to do more damage in the bottom of the inning against Carlos Martinez after Ronald Acuna Jr.'s RBI single cut the lead to 9-6, but Martinez struck out Freeman with the bases loaded. Freeman slammed his bat down in disgust. 'Big moment, obviously, bases loaded and a three-run game at that moment,' St. Louis manager Mike Shildt said. 'He made a money pitch.' Molina hit his 18th homer, a two-run shot off Arodys Vizcaino, in the ninth. BAD MOVES Cardinals CF Yairo Munoz made two errors in the sixth that let Atlanta cut the lead to 6-4. He dropped the ball after picking up Ender Inciarte's single, allowing Inciarte to advance to second and Johan Camargo to third. Munoz made a throwing error to third on Tyler Flowers' single, allowing both runners to score. TRAINER'S ROOM Cardinals: Shildt said RHP Bud Norris wasn't available because of irritated skin on his right middle finger. Norris left Sunday night's win over the Dodgers after walking the only batter he faced. Braves: Camargo, the team's everyday third baseman, went 1 for 5 in his return to the lineup after missing the past four games with left groin tightness. UP NEXT Cardinals: LHP Austin Gomber (5-1, 3.78 ERA) will make his first career start against Atlanta on Tuesday. Gomber allowed seven runs and nine hits in his last start, lasting three innings in a 9-7 loss to the Dodgers. Braves: RHP Anibal Sanchez (6-5, 3.01 ERA) seeks his first victory since Aug. 3, a span of eight starts in which he's 1-1 with a 3.02 ERA. ___ More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/tag/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • E_Munoz 2 (14). LOB_St. Louis 7, Atlanta 10. 2B_Martinez (25), DeJong (20), Ozuna (16), Gyorko (18), Wong (17), Markakis (42). HR_Bader (11), DeJong (18), Molina (18), Wong (9), F.Freeman (22). SF_Flowers (1). HBP_by Foltynewicz (Molina), by Mikolas (Flowers). WP_Biddle. Umpires_Home, Sam Holbrook; First, Vic Carapazza; Second, Jim Wolf; Third, D.J. Reyburn. T_3:38. A_24,304 (41,149).