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    Seventy-seven-year-old María Gonzalez is tired of waking up, Monday to Friday, to sell toilet paper in the Chilean capital. Her meager $146 monthly pension puts her below the poverty line, which in Chile is around $222 a month. “I feel tired. Honestly, I’m exhausted. These last 15 days that I have been at home, I slept and ate,” Gonzalez told The Associated Press after protests shut down public transport and made it impossible for her to reach the city to sell. What started on Oct. 18 as a student protest over a modest subway fare hike has ballooned into a massive, mostly peaceful social uprising that continues to consume Chile. Those early days were marked by attacks across Santiago’s subway that rendered public transit nonexistent. Looting of grocery stores and pharmacies also broke out. The chaos meant that thousands of people couldn’t get to work. The protests include struggling retirees as well as others seeking better salaries, subsidized housing, a decrease in the cost of medicine and a new constitution. Many also want to overhaul a dictatorship-era private pension system that is widely criticized in a country with a rapidly aging population. More than 1.2-million Chileans receive a pension that is less than $216 a month, well below the minimum salary of $400. Like Gonzalez, many retirees need to work in the informal sector to make ends meet. She sells big toilet paper rolls for offices, and paper towels. “Sometimes I’m left with everything... but when I sell, I earn 5,000 to 6,000 pesos (the equivalent of $7 or $8),” she said. “With that money, I can charge my phone, buy bread, buy some chicken.” On an unusually good month, she can earn $160 this way, helping cover living expenses and her $133 rent in the impoverished settlement of Cerro Navia on the outskirts of Santiago. She says without that extra income, she would be living off the cold bread, powdered milk and soup that the state’s health system provides for the elderly who live in poverty. “I’m always eating beans, chickpeas,” she said. “For example, today I didn’t go to the grocery store and I’m living off my breakfast, which was milk, tea, and a pastry that cost 1,300 pesos ($1.70).” The limitations of her life are visible in other ways. “I don’t have a heater, I don’t have anything. ... I’m sleeping on a cot someone gave me. I don’t have enough to buy a bed,” said Gonzalez, who lives alone. “One day I sat down and I figured out I spend more than 500,000 pesos ($660) a year just on transportation.” It costs Gonzalez $42 a month to take public transportation twice a day. That’s 29% of the pension received by the poorest in society. And while a middle class household of two spends roughly $28 a month on electricity, $21 on water and $45 on gas, the cost of a basic basket of food costs, according to the government, about $58. In 1981, during the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet, Chile enacted a pension system that requires all workers to allocate 10% of their earnings to privately run pension fund administrators, known by their Spanish initials of AFP. Those who haven’t made contributions, or have very few, receive a basic pension from the state that amounts to $146 a month. That minimum wasn’t introduced until 2008 under the government of Michelle Bachelet, and later modified in response to public demands. Some 500,000 elderly receive that basic pension. Gonzalez calls the AFP system “terrible.” Women, who can retire at the age of 60 versus the age of 65 for men, typically have saved less. That is reflected in their pensions, which are smaller, although they live longer than men. Prior to the protests, President Sebastián Piñera announced a pension reform proposal that would increase contributions from 10% to 14%, with employers responsible for covering the increase. Segundo Vergara, 69, earns 400,000 pesos ($530) a month as a cleaner. If his wife wasn’t working, “we would be living off bread and water, eating rice and pasta every day,” he told the AP as he attended a demonstration in Santiago. Vergara said he is still working in hopes of taking advantage of a proposed law, not yet approved, that would reward those who retire later with an additional contribution from the state to their pension. At the moment, his pension would be about $260. Margarita Álvarez, who works at a human rights organization and has a disability pension, said that the existing pension system needs to go “because in the end, the people who win are the ones who are managing the money.” The six pension companies that manage Chileans’ savings recently announced that their earnings during the first nine months of the year had jumped 70.6%, thanks in part to better profitability, and more people contributing. Álvarez, 64, lives with her husband, a daughter and grandchildren. She says they are able to eat beef twice a month. “The rest is vegetable soup. Luckily, artichokes are around, because they are cheaper, and eggs ... which help a lot at home, especially when you have children. You have to feed them protein somehow.” Fernando Larraín, director general of the pension administrators’ association, said that the issue Chile confronts is one of meager salaries, as well as the fact a large number of retirees worked during the 80s and 90s, when the salaries in the country were even lower. “In addition, today, we have around 30% of the population that isn’t contributing” to pensions on a regular basis, he said. He also said that the 10% savings rate is “a lot lower than the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. We have retirement ages that have not adapted to the reality of the labor market ... and a basic pension in which the state uses 0.8% of its gross domestic product, compared to 6%, on average, of OECD countries.” Benjamín Saez, an economist at Fundacion Sol, an NGO that specializes in issues of inequality, said that people who made pension contributions over 30 years or more still receive just about $266.” He said that introduction of the minimum $146 pension has only served to “postpone the crisis” as it “is not enough to cover even 70% of the poverty line.” ___ Associated Press writer Marcos Sepúlveda contributed to this report.
  • Rafael Nadal staged another comeback to stay in contention for a semifinal spot at the ATP Finals. The top-ranked Spaniard still needs help from Daniil Medvedev to avoid an early exit. Nadal rallied to beat already-qualified Stefanos Tsitsipas 6-7 (4), 6-4, 7-5 on Friday for his second win of the round-robin stage. That still won’t be enough, though, if Alexander Zverev beats Medvedev in the last match of the group phase. That would leave Zverev, Nadal and Tsitispas with identical 2-1 records. But Nadal would finish third in the group based on the tournament’s tiebreaker rules. Making things worse for Nadal is that his win ended Medvedev’s chances of advancing, meaning the Russian (0-2) has only pride to play for against Zverev. Nadal lost his opening match to Zverev and saved a match point at 5-1 down in the third set against Medvedev on Wednesday before rallying to win. The comeback against Tsitsipas wasn’t quite as dramatic. Nadal never faced a break point in the match but lost the last three points of the first-set tiebreaker to hand the Greek the lead. But he broke for a 5-3 lead in the second set and again to make it 6-5 in the third, then converted his first match point when Tsitsipas netted a forehand. Regardless of whether he advances, Nadal is guaranteed to leave London with the year-end No. 1 ranking after Novak Djokovic was eliminated in the group stage on Thursday with a loss to Roger Federer. It’s the fifth time that the 19-time Grand Slam winner ends the year atop the rankings, tied for second on the all-time list with Djokovic, Federer and Jimmy Connors. Pete Sampras did it six times. At 33, Nadal is the oldest man to finish the year as No. 1. However, he has never won the ATP Finals despite qualifying for a 15th year in a row. He has had to pull out of the tournament on six occasions because of injuries and reached the final only twice, the last time in 2013. ___ More AP Tennis: https://www.apnews.com/apf-Tennis and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Mina Lioness’ longstanding battle to finally receive writing credit on Lizzo’s megahit song “Truth Hurts” is paying off in more ways than one: it could win her a potential Grammy Award. Lizzo's breakthrough tune features the signature line — 'I just took a DNA test, turns out I'm 100% that bitch” — a lyric that originated from a 2017 tweet by Lioness and was turned into a popular meme. And now Lioness, a singer based in London who Lizzo agreed to give writing credit to, has a chance at earning her first Grammy nomination if “Truth Hurts” scores a nomination for song of the year — a category reserved for the writers of a song. “I haven't really been able to kind of just sit and ponder what the ramifications is of this happening. I mean, it's just surreal to me,” Lioness said in a phone interview from London with The Associated Press this week. “I didn't actually realize that the Grammy nominations were being announced next week, but I knew that this would be a possibility for me when it’s all said and done. But for it to come through so soon as well, it's just another one of those moments when you’re like, ‘Wow.’” The Recording Academy will announce its nominees on Nov. 20. When Grammy submissions were due earlier this year, Lioness had not been a listed writer of “Truth Hurts,” but Atlantic Records, Lizzo’s label home, told the AP they are in the process of submitting Lioness’ name as a co-writer of “Truth Hurts” to the Grammys. “Truth Hurts,” which topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart for seven weeks, is a likely contender in categories like song of the year, in which Lioness would share the nomination with co-writers Lizzo, Ricky Reed, Tele and Jesse Saint John. The song could also land a nomination for record of the year, a category that awards the song’s performers, producers and engineers/mixers, or best pop solo performance, an award that would only be given to Lizzo. Lioness said next week will be one of the biggest in her life — not only does she find out if she’ll become a Grammy nominee, she will “find out the results of my master's degree, pretty much on the same day (as the Grammy nominations).” “I still got work tomorrow,” added Lioness, who studied social policy at the London School of Economics. “I’m still a regular person.” Lioness created the tweet that’s changed her life “from zero to 100” — as she put it — around 4 o’clock in the morning in 2017. She said she was responding to a tweet from singer-actress Demi Lovato, who had posted about her ancestry background results. “She was saying all these different places she’s from and in one tweet she was like, ‘And I’m 1% African.’ And I was just so besides myself. I was just laughing so hard,” Lioness said. So she replied with: “I just did a DNA test and found out I’m 100% that bitch.” She went to bed. Woke up. And she had gone viral. Her bold sentence has become so popular that even Hillary Clinton tweeted some of the line, sans the vulgar word in August around the time “Truth Hurts” became a worldwide hit. The song was originally released in 2017 but got a boost this year after it was featured in the Netflix film 'Someone Great,' and as Lizzo’s label saw the public’s interest in the song, they decided to push it. Lioness learned her words were featured in “Truth Hurts” when she and some friends were Googling some of their most popular tweets. “I was just like, ‘What?’ From then on I started to try to get in contact with Lizzo,” she said. Eventually things blew up for Lizzo last month when the songwriting brothers Justin and Jeremiah Raisen said they felt they deserved writing credit on 'Truth Hurts.” A week later, Lizzo announced she was giving credit to Lioness and later filed a lawsuit to establish that the Raisens, as well as Justin 'Yves' Rothman, are not entitled to any credit for the song. Lioness said, at first, she wasn’t sure what to do when she discovered her words were in a pop song. “I had a lot of resentment at first, I will be completely honest. It did hurt me in the beginning to know that no one actually believed that you’re the one who brought this to the internet,” she said. “It’s so easy to erase credit online, but I just wasn’t going down without a fight.” She said watching Peaches Monroee — the young girl who went viral after praising her eyebrows for being “on fleek” — not be properly credited for starting the trendy word inspired her to fight hard for her own credit. “I saw that she was pleading and it hurt to watch another black girl have to beg for something that she put on the internet just out of a sheer joke. People told me to do the same, people told me to do a GoFundMe, but I just didn't want to do any of that because I'm not begging for something that belongs to me. Absolutely not,” she said. Things worked out for Lioness, and she and Lizzo are on good terms. They met in person this month after Lizzo’s concert in London. “She’s just really kind. She spoke to my heart. She looked me in my eyes and we had a really heartfelt conversation and we hugged,” Lioness said. And now Lioness is using her newfound fame to help boost her own music career. She said she’s been singing since she was 3 and counts Jill Scott, Mary J. Blige and Erykah Badu as inspirations. She and her musical partner, Jam, have released music together, and they are busy working on more songs as well as writing for others. “It's still tough because I would like to be known for what I said, but I don't want to be defined by one moment,” said Lioness. “I’m a very multidimensional artist. And so I don't want to be known for just one thing, and I don't want this to be the peak of my career.”
  • Browns defensive end Myles Garrett was suspended for at least the rest of the regular season and postseason by the NFL on Friday for using a helmet “as a weapon” and striking Pittsburgh quarterback Mason Rudolph in the head. His violent outburst in the final seconds of Thursday’s nationally televised game against the Steelers landed him the longest suspension for a single on-field infraction in league history. Tennessee’s Albert Haynesworth was suspended five games in 2006. Garrett was also fined an undisclosed amount and must meet with Commissioner Roger Goodell’s office before his reinstatement is considered. Garrett ripped off Rudolph’s helmet and clobbered him on top of the head, triggering a brawl between the rivals. Rudolph avoided serious injury and called the defensive star's attack 'cowardly and bush league.' The league said Garrett “violated unnecessary roughness and unsportsmanlike conduct rules, as well as fighting and removing an opponent’s helmet and using it as a weapon.” Steelers center Maurkice Pouncey was suspended three games for punching and kicking Garrett, and Browns defensive tackle Larry Ogunjobi was suspended for one game. He shoved Rudolph to the ground from behind during the melee. The suspended players have three business days to appeal their penalties. The Steelers and Browns were also fined $250,000 each. “We are extremely disappointed in what transpired last evening at the end of our game,” Browns owners Dee and Jimmy Haslam said in a statement. “There is no place for that in football and that is not reflective of the core values we strive for as an organization. “We sincerely apologize to Mason Rudolph and the Pittsburgh Steelers. Myles Garrett has been a good teammate and member of our organization and community for the last three years but his actions last night were completely unacceptable. We understand the consequences from the league for his actions.” Garrett’s attack on Rudolph drew condemnation across the league and sports world. His disturbing actions will cost the Browns (4-6), who have moved back into the playoff race but must now play the rest of this season without their best defensive player. ___ More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • Cleveland police say they are not investigating Browns player Myles Garrett for striking a Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback in the head with a helmet. Sgt. Jennifer Ciaccia (CHAWCH’) said Friday that police hadn’t received a complaint from Mason Rudolph. And a city spokeswoman says the prosecutor can’t comment because Rudolph hasn’t filed a complaint. Rudolph’s agent, Tim Younger, tells media outlets that no legal options “have been removed from the table.” Rudolph called Garrett’s actions “pretty cowardly.” Garrett pulled off Rudolph’s helmet during a melee at the end of Thursday night’s game in Cleveland and used it to strike him on the head. Garrett is the NFL’s No. 1 overall pick in 2017 and was ejected from the game. The NFL on Friday suspended Garrett indefinitely.
  • There aren’t many ranked teams who bring a backup quarterback into a meeting with the media to preview their next opponent late in the season. No. 2 Ohio State (9-0, 6-0 Big Ten) isn’t your ordinary team. The Buckeyes have won 15 straight games dating to last season and lead the nation with a 42.4-point scoring margin heading into Saturday’s game against woeful Rutgers (2-7, 0-6), which fired coach Chris Ash in September. Oddsmakers have made Ohio State a 51-point favorite, which according to some bookmakers is the biggest in a Big Ten game. Expect the Buckeyes to win big and to use a lot of players. Ohio State coach Ryan Day had several players available at the press conference, including backup quarterback Chris Chugunov. The graduate student is from Skillman, New Jersey, which is about 15-to-20 minutes from the Rutgers campus. He spent the first three seasons at West Virginia. If Ohio State scores like it has been this season, Chugunov probably will play in New Jersey for the first time in his college career. “I’m looking forward to it,” he said. “I think the thing I’m most excited about is I have a large group of family and friends who can’t always make it out here to Ohio for games, so I’m excited to have them there to see me play. We’re going to prepare for Rutgers like we do for everyone else we play each Saturday.” Chugunov has played in eight games this season, hitting 20 of 27 passes for 214 yards and four touchdowns. Five things to watch on Saturday: ABSENT Ohio State star defensive end Chase Young will miss his second straight game. The nation’s leader in sacks will be held out of one more game as punishment for breaking NCAA rules by accepting a personal loan. He sat out last week’s win against Maryland. The junior will return for the last two regular-season games with No. 9 Penn State and No. 14 Michigan. Young has 13½ sacks, 29 total tackles and five forced fumbles. With fellow starting defensive end Jonathan Cooper out with an injury, freshman Zach Harrison and sophomore Tyreke Smith will start for the Buckeyes. HISTORY Ohio State and Rutgers have played five times. The Buckeyes have won all five by a combined margin of 271-27. Over the last three years, the combined margin is 166-3. That’s an average winning margin of 54.3 points. So, it is understandable Ohio State is a 51-point favorite against a team that last won a Big Ten game in November 2017. The Scarlet Knights have a lost 18 straight conference games. FIELDS DAY Justin Fields has been nearly unstoppable in his first year as Ohio State’s quarterback. The sophomore who transferred from Georgia has thrown 27 touchdowns and run for 10 more. His 37 TDs are the second most in the country behind Jalen Hurts of Oklahoma. Fields has had at least one rushing touchdown and passing touchdown in eight of nine games. His 183.53 efficiency rating ranks fifth in the nation. His 68.2% completion percentage is 14th overall. The Buckeyes have scored 40 or more points in seven of nine games. HELP Rutgers probably will get leading rusher Isaih Pacheco back for the game. The sophomore missed the Illinois game on Nov. 2 with a foot injury. With a bye last week, he should be ready to go. Pacheco has run for 541 yards and six touchdowns. He ran for 107 yards and two touchdowns against Liberty. The Ohio State defense has allowed points on 14 of 115 opponent drives this season and only three rushing touchdowns. DOMINATION The Buckeyes are fifth nationally in total offense (535.9 yards) and first in total defense (214.8 yards). They have the most touchdowns in the country (62) and given up the fewest (8). “Honestly, they're about as complete a football team as I've seen,” Rutgers interim head coach Nunzio Campanile said. “Really in all three phases of the game, they're pretty darned good. If there's a team out there better than them, I'd like to see it, but there's some pretty good teams out there.” ___ AP Sports Writer Mitch Stacy in Columbus, Ohio contributed to this report. ___ More AP college football: https://apnews.com/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25
  • Witnesses described chaos outside bars early Friday during a fatal shooting that involved police at an entertainment complex in North Carolina’s biggest city. The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department said in a tweet that at least one officer was involved in the shooting that left one person dead and another hospitalized with wounds that were not life-threatening. Police said no officers were injured. The shooting happened in the vicinity of the Epicentre complex of bars and restaurants in the heart of Charlotte’s Uptown business district, police said. The shooting created chaos and drew multiple officers to the area as bars were closing about 2 a.m., witnesses told WSOC-TV. Witness Dedrick Gamble said at least one person in the crowd fired a gun, causing police to approach, and then at least one officer fired. 'When he hit the guy, the police came up behind them and the next thing you know, they was on the ground. ... Crazy. It's madness down here,' Gamble said. Another witness told the station that he saw two fighting men pull out guns and shoot at each other. “They tumbled, stumbled, one dude was trying to get the gun off him, kept shooting the gun at the floor, ricocheting. The cops was around the corner. I heard the cops say, ‘Drop the gun,' but they kept shooting,' Jose Rodriguez said. The State Bureau of Investigation has been called in to investigate. It wasn’t immediately clear whether officers fired the shots that hit either person. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Capt. Brad Koch referred questions to the State Bureau of Investigation. The SBI said it was still gathering information Friday. Identities of those involved weren’t immediately released. WSOC reports that dozens of evidence markers, including one marking a handgun, were visible behind police tape as investigators combed the scene. Streets around the scene were blocked off for several hours before reopening about 8 a.m.
  • Two doorbell cameras captured the final seconds of the flight of a small plane that crashed into a house last month in New Jersey and burst into flames, according to a preliminary report released Friday. The Cessna crashed in the Colonia section of Woodbridge Township, about 18 miles southwest of New York, on Oct. 29, killing the pilot and damaging three homes. No one on the ground was injured. Friday’s report didn’t speculate on what caused the crash, and many of its contents were already known from witness accounts and news reports. A probable cause report could take two years. The pilot, Dr. Michael Schloss, of Port Orange, Florida, was an experienced flier who had left Leesburg Executive Airport in Virginia that morning en route to an airport in Linden, New Jersey, about 3 miles from the crash site. National Transportation Safety Board investigators wrote Friday that the plane maintained a steady altitude up to about 30 seconds before the crash, and then made a steep left turn in the final seconds. Air traffic controllers had cleared Schloss to approach the airport shortly before the crash. A doorbell camera showed the plane’s rapidly accelerating downward left turn, and another showed the plane’s final four seconds as it disappeared behind treetops and crashed. Significant portions of the plane were damaged by the impact and subsequent fire, but investigators were able to attain readings from the airspeed indicator and altimeter. Those indicated a speed of 59 knots, or about 68 mph, and an altitude of 200 feet, according to the report. Schloss didn’t make a distress call to air traffic control before the crash, investigators have said. A preliminary autopsy report last week concluded the 74-year-old cardiologist was alive at the time of impact and found no evidence his heart was in distress. The weather was overcast the day of the crash, and Schloss was flying using instruments to guide him, a technique he was qualified to use.
  • Roger Stone, a longtime friend and ally of President Donald Trump, was found guilty Friday of witness tampering and lying to Congress about his pursuit of Russian-hacked emails damaging to Hillary Clinton’s 2016 election bid. Stone was convicted of all seven counts in a federal indictment that accused him of lying to Congress, tampering with a witness and obstructing the House investigation into whether the Trump campaign coordinated with Russia to tip the 2016 election. He is the sixth Trump aide or adviser to be convicted of charges brought as part of special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation. Stone has denied wrongdoing and consistently criticized the case against him as politically motivated. He did not take the stand during the trial and his lawyers did not call any witnesses in his defense. Stone, 67, showed no visible reaction as the verdict was read aloud, count by count. He’s scheduled to be sentenced on Feb. 6. He could face up to 20 years. Another former Trump campaign aide, Michael Caputo, was removed by the courtroom by security officers after he turned his back on the jury after the verdict was read. Stone smirked at reporters as he left the courtroom, holding hands with his wife. As he walked out of the courthouse, Stone was asked if he had any comment on the verdict and replied: “none whatsoever” before he hopped into a waiting SUV with his wife. Trump tweeted minutes after the verdict, calling the conviction “a double standard like never seen before in the history of our Country,” because his frequent nemeses, including Hillary Clinton, former FBI Director James Comey and “including even Mueller himself,” have not been convicted. “Didn’t they lie?” In a trial that lasted about a week, witnesses highlighted how Trump campaign associates were eager to gather information about emails the U.S. says were hacked by Russia and then provided to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks. Steve Bannon, who served as the campaign’s chief executive, testified during the trial the trial that Stone had boasted about his ties to WikiLeaks and its founder Julian Assange, alerting them to pending new batches of damaging emails. Campaign officials saw Stone as the “access point” to WikiLeaks, he said. After the verdict was read, prosecutors asked for Stone to be jailed as he awaits sentencing, arguing that he may have violated a judge’s order that prohibits him from communicating with the media about his case. But Judge Amy Berman Jackson rejected that request and said Stone will be subject to same conditions he faced following his arrest, including the gag order. Throughout the trial, prosecutors used Stone's own text messages and emails — some of which appeared to contradict his congressional testimony — to lay out their case that he lied to Congress and threatened a witness. Stone did not testify, and his lawyers called no witnesses in his defense. On Tuesday, a top Trump campaign official, Rick Gates, who was a key cooperator in the Mueller probe, testified that that Stone tried to contact Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law, to 'debrief' him about developments on the hacked emails. Prosecutors alleged Stone lied to Congress about his conversations about WikiLeaks with New York radio host and comedian Randy Credico — who scored an interview with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in 2016, when he was avoiding prosecution by sheltering in the Ecuadoran embassy in London — and conservative writer and conspiracy theorist Jerome Corsi. During the 2016 campaign, Stone had mentioned in interviews and public appearances that he was in contact with Assange through a trusted intermediary and hinted at inside knowledge of WikiLeaks' plans. But he started pressing Credico to broker a contact, and Credico testified that he told Stone to work through his own intermediary. Earlier testimony revealed that Stone, while appearing before the House Intelligence Committee, named Credico as his intermediary to Assange and pressured Credico not to contradict him. After Credico was contacted by Congress, he reached out to Stone, who told him he should 'stonewall it' and 'plead the fifth,' he testified. Credico also testified during Stone’s trial that Stone repeatedly told him to “do a ‘Frank Pentangeli,’” a reference to a character in “The Godfather: Part II” who lies before Congress. Prosecutors said Stone had also threatened Credico's therapy dog, Bianca, saying he was “going to take that dog away from you.” ___ Follow Michael Balsamo on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MikeBalsamo1 and Ashraf Khalil at www.twitter.com/ashrafkhalil.
  • Former Browns wide receiver Antonio Callaway has been suspended 10 games by the NFL for another violation of the league’s substance-abuse policy. League spokesman Brian McCarthy said Friday that Callaway will begin serving the suspension immediately. The 22-year-old player was suspended four games earlier this season for a drug violation. He was released on Thursday by Cleveland just hours before the club played the Pittsburgh Steelers. The Browns ran out of patience with Callaway, who had legal troubles in college at Florida. Browns coach Freddie Kitchens benched Callaway for Sunday’s game against Buffalo after the receiver arrived late for the game. Despite his troubled past, Callaway was drafted by the Browns in the fourth round last year. He had 34 catches for 586 yards and five touchdowns as a rookie. Callaway is now a free agent and can sign with any team. ___ More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL