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    New York Yankees shortstop Didi Gregorius played five innings of defense and went 2 for 4 with a walk Monday at extended spring training in his first game action since Tommy John surgery on Oct. 17. 'It was good,' Gregorius said. Playing against Detroit Tigers minor leaguers and in front of Yankees owner Hal Steinbrenner, Gregorius singled twice and cleanly fielded three grounders but had an error for an errant throw to first base. Gregorius is coming back from surgery to a torn ulnar collateral ligament in his right elbow. He appears on track to start a minor league injury rehabilitation assignment in a week or two and rejoin the Yankees in late June. Gregorius had an eventful first inning. He charged to field a one-hopper and then make an accurate throw to first to retire the second batter After fouling a ball off his foot and breaking a bat on a pop foul, Gregorius drew a walk in the bottom half. He slid feet first into second base on grounder, then slid headfirst into third on an infield single. Gregorius hit .268 with a career-high 27 homers and 86 RBIs last season. He injured the elbow while making a throw from left field after a ball bounced off Fenway Park's Green Monster during Game 2 of the AL Division Series at Boston last Oct. Outfielder Giancarlo Stanton was scheduled to start an injury rehab assignment for Class A Tampa on Monday night. He has not played since March 31 because of a strained left biceps and then a strained left shoulder. Shortstop Troy Tulowitzki, sidelined since April 3 by a strained left calf, resumed on-field batting practice Monday and continued taking grounders at shortstop and third base. ___ More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • The sister of former NBA player Sebastian Telfair was accused on Monday of threatening a woman who testified against him at his New York City gun-possession trial. Octavia Telfair was charged in federal court in Brooklyn with transmitting an interstate threat. There was no immediate response to an email seeking comment from her lawyer. Sebastian Telfair — a once highly touted point guard with a disappointing NBA career and a history of brushes with the law — was convicted last month of carrying loaded guns in his pickup truck. Witnesses included his estranged wife and a girlfriend. Shortly after the guilty verdict, Octavia Telfair made threatening phone calls to one of the witnesses in California, according to a criminal complaint that didn't identify the alleged victim. The sister told the woman she either was 'gonna die' or going to have to live with a 'rearranged face,' the complaint says. The Brooklyn-born Sebastian Telfair was a first-round draft pick out of high school in 2004. He started with the Portland Trail Blazers and spent time with the Boston Celtics, Minnesota Timberwolves and other teams before ending his career in China in 2014. Telfair and a friend were arrested in 2007 after a traffic stop during which police found a loaded handgun in the vehicle. He pleaded guilty to criminal possession of a weapon and was sentenced to three years' probation. Telfair faces 3 ½ to 15 years in prison at his sentencing next month for his current gun case.
  • South Carolina legislators are expected to clear the final hurdle to giving the Carolina Panthers up to $120 million in tax breaks to move their practice fields and team headquarters out of North Carolina. The Senate voted 23-16 on Monday to approve a compromise smoothing over small differences in the bill. The House is expected to pass the bill later Monday and Gov. Henry McMaster is expected to quickly sign it into law. The bill exempts the Panthers from paying state income taxes for players, coaches and other employees for 15 years as long as they use the money to build their new complex near Rock Hill. The team would continue to play games 15 miles (25 kilometers) north in Charlotte, North Carolina.
  • Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said Monday he is seeking the removal of the country's interior minister over a video scandal that has rocked the Alpine nation in recent days. The move, which must be approved by Austria's president, is expected to trigger a walk-out of Interior Minister Herbert Kickl's far-right Freedom Party from the coalition government. Kurz, who became chancellor with help from the Freedom Party in 2017, said Austrians want clarity on the apparent influence-peddling scandal involving Kickl's party and a purported Russian investor. 'I'm firmly convinced that what's necessary now is total transparency and a completely and unbiased investigation,' he told reporters in Vienna. Pledging to ensure stability over the coming months, Kurz said that if the Freedom Party leaves his government — as it has threatened to do — vacant positions would be filled with civil servants and technocrats until the next national elections, which are expected in September. Kickl's imminent removal follows the resignation on Saturday of Freedom Party leader Heinz-Christian Strache, who was also Austria's vice chancellor, after two German newspapers published a damning video showing him pandering to a woman claiming to be a Russian tycoon's niece at a boozy gathering in Ibiza two years ago. In the video, Strache and party colleague Johann Gudenus are heard telling the woman that she can expect lucrative construction contracts if she buys an Austrian newspaper and supports the Freedom Party. Gudenus has quit as leader of the party's parliamentary group and is leaving the party. Kurz noted that at the time the video was shot, Kickl was general-secretary of the Freedom Party and therefore responsible for its financial conduct. Kurz added that in conversations with Kickl and other Freedom Party officials following the video's release, he 'didn't really have the feeling (they had) an awareness of the dimension of the whole issue.' Strache's resignation represents a setback for populist and nationalist forces as Europe heads into the final days of campaigning for the European Parliament elections, which run from Thursday through Sunday. Kurz has endorsed a hard line on migration and public finances, and chose to ally with the Freedom Party after winning the 2017 election. The 32-year-old, who is personally popular, said Saturday that 'enough is enough' — a reference to a string of smaller scandals involving the Freedom Party that had plagued his government. In recent months, those have included a poem in a party newsletter comparing migrants to rats and questions over links to extreme-right groups. Kickl, a longtime campaign mastermind of the Freedom Party, has drawn criticism over matters including a raid last year on Austria's BVT spy agency, which opposition parties claimed was an attempt by the new government to purge domestic political enemies. His party said he had done nothing wrong. The Russian government, meanwhile, said it couldn't comment on the video 'because it has nothing to do with the Russian Federation, its president or the government.' President Vladimir Putin's spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, said of the woman in the Strache video that set off the crisis: 'We don't know who that woman is and whether she's Russian or not.' ___ Frank Jordans and Geir Moulson contributed from Berlin. Vladimir Isachenkov contributed from Moscow.
  • Alabama's governor said Monday the new abortion ban she recently signed into law reflects the high value residents place on the 'sanctity of life,' adding she doesn't expect any fallout from the controversial measure on tourism or business recruitment. Gov. Kay Ivey last week approved the most stringent abortion law in the nation— making performing an abortion a felony in nearly all cases unless necessary for the mother's health. The law provides no exception for rape and incest. Asked about criticism the state has received— particularly over the lack of an exception for rape and incest— the Republican governor noted the bill was overwhelmingly approved by the Alabama Legislature without the exceptions. 'The Legislature has spoken,' she said. 'It underscores the sanctity of life the people of Alabama value so highly.' The Republican governor was asked about the ban after a news conference Monday about the state tourism industry. The bill's passage drew calls on social media by some opponents to boycott the state in protest. Ivey brushed off any suggestions protesters could do any possible harm to tourism and efforts to woo new industry and business to Alabama. 'Alabama has a lot of different variety of things to visit and enjoy and our visitors will continue to come,' Ivey said. The law does not take effect for six months and legal challenges are widely expected to block it in the courts. On Sunday, hundreds of marchers took to the streets in Montgomery, Birmingham and Huntsville to protest the abortion ban that Ivey signed into law. Crowds chanted 'my body, my choice!' and 'vote them out!' 'Banning abortion does not stop abortion. It stops safe abortion,' said Staci Fox, CEO and president of Planned Parenthood Southeast, addressing the cheering crowd outside the Alabama Capitol. Carrying an orange sign with a coat hanger and the caption 'No Never Again,' 69-year-old Deborah Hall of Montgomery said she remembers life before Roe and can't believe the push to return there. 'I know what that time is like. I had friends who had illegal abortions and barely survived,' said Hall, who for a time ran a clinic in Montgomery that provided abortion, birth control and other services. Alabama is part of a wave of conservative states seeking to mount new legal challenges to Roe v. Wade , the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide. Governors in Kentucky, Mississippi, Ohio and Georgia have approved bans on abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected, which can happen as early as the sixth week of pregnancy. Marchers on Sunday said the measures have energized supporters of legalized abortion, and they say they are digging in for a legal and political fight. 'We are coming for their seats,' Fox said of legislators who approved the ban.
  • A Taco Bell employee in Missouri lost her job after a video depicting a profanity-laced tirade against Muslims went viral, KTVI reported. >> Read more trending news  The May 14 incident took place around 1 a.m. in the drive-thru at the fast-food restaurant in Bridgeton, the television station reported. According to a tweet by Tarek Hamdan, who recorded the exchange, he had a “25-minute debate” with a worker who insisted “all Muslims are terrorists. “It’s not what you think and what you see in the news,” Hamdan tells the worker in the video. We don’t follow those people. Those people are monsters. Those people are disgusting. Those are the people who make the religion look bad.” After uttering a slur against Muslims, the woman, who had given Hamdan her phone number, invited him to call her to change her mind, according to the video. “They tore down my country,” the worker said. “They killed thousands of my people. So you need to change my mind, and I’m not going to cater to you, you’re going to need to cater to me ’cause this is on my territory.”  In a statement, Taco Bell officials said the employee had been fired. “We welcome everyone in our restaurants and do not tolerate this type of behavior,” the company said. “This is a franchise location and the team member involved no longer works for this franchisee. The franchisee has reached out to the customer to apologize.” “I am utterly appalled by this ugly display of anti-Muslim bigotry and ignorance,” Faizan Syed, executive director of the Council of American-Islamic Relations-Missouri, told KSDK. “Taco Bell needs to take this incident seriously, apologize to the customer and immediately implement cultural competency training for all of their staff.”
  • Greek NBA star Giannis Antetokounmpo has agreed to fund the construction of an indoor basketball court in a fire-ravaged area outside Athens where at least 100 people were killed last year. The mayor of the Rafina area where the fire occurred last July said on Monday the local authority received the offer from the Milwaukee Bucks player to build the court at a new recycling park that is being planned in the area. The mayor, Vangelis Bournous, gave no details of the construction cost but said the venue would be ready at the end of this summer. The blaze gutted the seaside resort of Mati, east of Athens, and other coastal areas, destroying more than a thousand homes. 'Antetokounmpo, the well-known Giannis Antetokounmpo, has made a donation at the site to build an indoor court — I'm announcing this for the first time,' Bournous said at a campaign event ahead of local elections on Sunday. 'It will be built with a modern method using a steel building frame so it can be ready by the end of the summer.' Antetokounmpo's Bucks are leading in the NBA Eastern Conference finals 2-1 over the Toronto Raptors. The forward, the son of immigrants from Nigeria, was born and grew up in Athens and moved to the United States in 2013 to join the Bucks. He has a huge following in his home country, with fans following his games in the middle of the night. Antetokounmpo maintains close ties with Greece and has taken part in campaigns to promote a Greek airline and tourism, as well as recycling. His older brother, Thanasis Antetokounmpo, lives in Athens and plays for local club Panathinaikos, coached by Rick Pitino, formerly of the Boston Celtics and the Louisville Cardinals. ___ More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports ___ Follow Gatopoulos at http://www.twitter.com/dgatopoulos
  • A judge has cleared the way for the parents of a 21-year-old West Point cadet fatally injured in a skiing accident to use his frozen sperm to produce a child. Supreme Court Justice John Colangelo says in a decision dated Thursday the parents of Peter Zhu haven't decided whether to attempt conception with a surrogate mother. But he ruled it's their decision to make. Zhu, of Concord, California, died after a ski accident in February at West Point. His parents received court permission to have his sperm retrieved and frozen , but the judge waited until last week to rule on whether they could attempt reproduction. Colangelo said he found no restrictions in state or federal law. But he noted other obstacles including reluctance of some doctors to assist for ethical reasons.
  • The San Jose Sharks could be headed into their fifth elimination game of the postseason short-handed. The Sharks left town Monday to play Game 6 of the Western Conference final at St. Louis with questions about the status of captain Joe Pavelski, high-scoring forward Tomas Hertl and playmaking defenseman Erik Karlsson. Coach Peter DeBoer gave no update on their conditions and didn't say whether any of the three made the trip to St. Louis. San Jose lost all three stars to injuries during a 5-0 loss at home to the Blues on Sunday that left them trailing the best-of-seven series 3-2 headed into Tuesday night's game. The Sharks have already staved off elimination four times this postseason, rallying from 3-1 down in a first-round series against Vegas and then winning a seventh game on home ice in the second round against Colorado. 'We've dealt with this before and guys have stepped in and got the job done,' DeBoer said. 'People can write us off but I know in our room we know we have guys in there who we know can step in and get this done.' Pulling it off again against a deep and physical Blues team could be even more of a challenge, especially if the Sharks will be missing some key pieces. Karlsson has been dealing with groin injuries since January. He missed 27 of the final 33 regular-season games but returned for the start of the playoffs even if he often looked hampered by the injury. Karlsson appeared to be finding his groove, scoring two goals, including the overtime winner, in Game 3 at St. Louis before coming up lame again in the fourth game. Karlsson played just one shift in the final 9:24 of Game 4 but told DeBoer he was good to go Sunday. He wasn't moving well early in the game and committed a turnover that led to St. Louis' first goal. He played just 3:03 in the second period and was unable to accelerate on the play that led to Vladimir Tarasenko's penalty shot. Karlsson then didn't come back out for the third as DeBoer acknowledged he had regrets about playing him. If Karlsson is unable to go, Tim Heed will likely get his first action since filling in for an injured Marc-Edouard Vlasic in Games 3 and 4 of the opening round. But the Sharks will miss Karlsson, who has two goals and 14 assists this postseason. Hertl was hit high in the first period by Ivan Barbashev in a play the Sharks believe should have been penalized as an illegal hit to the head. He remained in the game through the second period but also didn't come out for the third. That was the second time this series the Sharks felt one of their players got hit in the head with no penalty in the game or supplemental discipline. Defenseman Justin Braun got hit by Sammy Blais in Game 3. 'You don't want to see your teammates get hit like that,' Braun said. 'You can't worry about the refs' calls or non-calls. You have to go out there and keep playing.' Pavelski, who led the team with 38 goals in the regular season, dealt with yet another injury early in the third when Alex Pietrangelo sent him into the boards and appeared to hit him high at the end with an elbow. Pavelski didn't return and there is concern because he missed six games already this postseason after a bloody concussion when his helmet slammed into the ice in Game 7 against Vegas. If Hertl and Pavelski can't go, the Sharks' depth up front will take a serious hit. Marcus Sorensen, who missed two of the past three games, could move back into the lineup, with winger Lukas Radil and untested center Dylan Gambrell also options. ___ More AP NHL: https://apnews.com/NHL and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • A key federal regulator says he backs T-Mobile's $26.5 billion takeover of rival wireless carrier Sprint, a crucial step for the deal's approval. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai said Monday he supported the deal because the two companies promised to expand mobile internet access in rural areas and roll out 5G , the next generation of mobile networks. While Pai's backing is important, further steps remain. The full commission of three Republicans and two Democrats must still vote, and the Justice Department must also clear it. State attorneys general may also move against the combination. Pai said Monday that the combination will help bring faster mobile broadband to rural Americans. The companies have made promises on building out 5G and expanding rural broadband before, but now they are attaching timelines and agreeing to penalties if they fail to meet their commitments. For instance, the companies promise to make fast internet available to 99% of Americans within six years after the deal's close. T-Mobile US Inc. and Sprint Corp. also said Monday that they would sell Sprint's prepaid cellphone brand Boost Mobile to address antitrust concerns. Several public-interest advocates dismissed the companies' promises Monday as not solving the issues posed by industry consolidation. Along with labor groups, the advocates have argued that the deal will lead to price increases and job cuts. Democratic lawmakers have also been skeptical of the companies' promises. Just because the FCC seems ready to approve the deal doesn't mean the Justice Department will, as the two agencies have different criteria. The Justice Department evaluates deals on whether they harm competition and raise prices for consumers, while the FCC examines whether a merger fulfills 'public interest' goals. Expanding internet access to more people could count as one such goal, for example. David Cicilline, a Rhode Island Democrat who heads the House antitrust subcommittee, called on the Justice Department to require that Sprint and T-Mobile show that the deal won't harm consumers. 'Empty promises will not make this transaction a good deal for American workers and consumers,' he said. Sprint and T-Mobile have been talking about their 5G plans even before proposing their combination, so it'll be tough to convince the Justice Department that the 5G buildout depends on it, said Amanda Wait, a partner at Norton Rose Fulbright and former Federal Trade Commission lawyer. And even then, the Justice Department has to decide if those benefits are greater than any consumer harms. Justice Department spokesman Jeremy Edwards declined to comment Monday. Sprint and T-Mobile argue that the combination will lead to better 5G service. They have made promises before to create U.S. jobs and build a home-internet business to compete with cable companies as well as Verizon and AT&T. They've also promised not to raise prices for three years. The Obama administration rebuffed the companies' earlier effort to merge, as well as an attempted deal between AT&T and T-Mobile, on concerns that such deals would hurt competition in the wireless industry. Shares of T-Mobile jumped 5.5% in afternoon trading, while Sprint's stock soared 22%. ___ Michelle Chapman reported from Newark, New Jersey.