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    The heads of some international sports federations complained this month that Tokyo Olympic organizers were cutting too deeply to save money. One said the cost reductions could make venues look cheap, reminding of deep, last-minute budget slashing at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics. John Coates, the IOC member who heads an inspection team that toured venues being built for the Tokyo Olympics, said Tuesday he was confident the problems will be solved. 'There were some issues identified recently,' Coates said, speaking to open three days of meetings. 'We think that you've been working them through. We're confident that you will be able to address them. They'll be the subject of more discussion.' Local organizers and the International Olympic Committee face a full agenda that includes labor issues, rising costs, worries about summer heat when the games open in less than 15 months, transportation and complaints about cost cutting from international sports federations. Issued last week, a report titled 'The Dark Side of the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics,' focused on alleged labor abuse at the new national stadium and the Olympic village, the two centerpiece venues. With an aging and declining population, Japan is shorthanded in many industries. The government has provided more visas for construction workers tied to the Olympics, and in April started allowing more foreign workers to reside in the country. Ambet Yuson, general secretary of Building and Wood Workers' International based in Geneva, said the critical report had been sent to IOC President Thomas Bach. 'We were informed by the IOC that they are in direct contact with the Tokyo 2020 to find remedies,' Yuson said in an email to The Associated Press. Yuson said he had not received a response from the Tokyo Metropolitan Government, which is building the Olympic village, nor the Japan Sport Council, a national government body that is building the stadium. The municipal government and the sports council told the AP they were reviewing the report but offered few other details. The report said interviewed workers complained about 'a pervasive culture of fear' that discouraged speaking out. It said almost half of the workers interviewed did not have formal contracts, and it found 'dangerous patterns of overwork' at both high-profile venues. It said some workers at the Olympic village reported working 28 consecutive days, and up to 26 straight at the national stadium. Yuson said some problems are exacerbated by tight Olympic deadlines and pressure to finish on time. 'The situation is even worse with so-called interns or migrant workers with issues — language, employment contracts and immigration issues,' Yuson said by email. 'Massive overtime in construction is really a big problem in Japan.' The labor federation began monitoring the Tokyo Olympics in 2016 and last interviewed workers in February. The report noted two workers have died on projects for the Tokyo Olympics. Death by overwork, known as 'karoshi,' is a problem in Japan with employees often forced to work long hours despite government measures to try to prevent it. Tokyo organizers also say they are trying to cut spending . This drew strong rebukes this month at an annual meeting in Australia of Summer Olympic sports federations. Federation heads said Tokyo organizers are trying to cut items they view as 'decorative' and might be out of the view of television cameras. They also complained about high hotel prices, and items being cut that they deem basic like food services, storage facilities and the 'look' of the venues. Francesco Ricci Bitti, head of the Summer Olympic sports federations, is also an IOC member and part of the inspection team. He has promised to push organizers about the cuts. Tokyo appears to be well-financed. The $5.6 billion privately funded operating budget — the budget to run the games themselves — is twice as large as that for the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. Still, the national government, cities and prefectures are chipping in at least $15 billion more to update infrastructure, build venues and get the country ready when the games open. Costs are higher in Japan than Brazil, with the governments still picking up about 70% of the Olympic bill. Tokyo officials have said operating costs have increased, partly by a decision to use more existing venues. Earlier plans called for constructing new venues, most of which would have been built at government expense. Coates said Tuesday that $2 billion to $4 billion had already been saved, partly by using existing venues. But doing so has also shifted more costs to local organizers. 'We think there is still more savings to be obtained,' Coates said, implying more reductions in certain areas. ___ Stephen Wade on Twitter: http://twitter.com/StephenWadeAP ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Susan E. Rice, the former national security adviser and U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, has a book coming out this fall. 'Tough Love' will be published Oct. 8, Simon & Schuster announced Tuesday. She will reflect on challenges and controversies that arose during the Obama administration, including the deadly 2012 raid on a diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya. Conservatives would accuse her of making misleading remarks about the attack, the subject of extensive, Republican-led investigations. Rice said in a statement that becoming 'synonymous with Benghazi' made her anxious to tell her story. According to the publisher, she has written an 'inspiring account' of her public and private life and will offer advice on how an African-American woman can compete in a field where few share her background.
  • A powerful storm system spawned a confirmed tornado Tuesday morning near Tulsa International Airport, after shutting down an interstate highway and prompting water rescues elsewhere in the state. More tornadoes, along with hail and damaging winds were predicted as the storms moved to the east. In Tulsa, forecasters confirmed a tornado near the airport at about 6:30 a.m. There were no immediate reports of damage or injuries, but tornado warnings remained in effect in many parts of the state. Many flights were canceled or delayed at the Tulsa airport because of the storms. Along with severe weather, the storms brought a deluge of rain, causing the Oklahoma Department of Transportation to shut down Interstate 40 in El Reno, about 25 miles (40 kilometers) west of Oklahoma City, because of high water Tuesday morning. The National Weather Service says up to 5 inches of rain had fallen since Monday. In Stillwater, home to Oklahoma State University, emergency responders were rescuing people from their homes because of high water. The Storm Prediction Center had warned of an unusually high risk for severe weather Monday for parts of Oklahoma and Texas. Damage was reported in many areas Monday night, including the town of Mangum, but no deaths have been reported.
  • The Latest on severe weather in the central United States (all times local): 8:15 a.m. Officials say there was at least minor damage, but no injuries reported when a tornado touched down near Tulsa International Airport. Oklahoma Office of Emergency Management spokeswoman Keli Cain said the area is being assessed following the Tuesday morning twister and that so far one home has been found damaged by a falling tree. Airport spokesman Andrew Pierini said there was no damage at the airport, approximately four miles (6 kilometers) from where the tornado touched down, but passengers were moved into shelters for about 30 minutes. The tornado comes as part of a powerful storm system that spawned dozens of tornado sightings Monday and caused significant flash flooding in parts of Oklahoma. The stormy weather is expected to continue Tuesday in eastern Oklahoma before moving into Arkansas, Missouri and western Illinois. ___ 7:25 a.m. Much of Kansas remains under flood warnings or watches as heavy rains are expected to push streams and rivers out of their banks. The National Weather Service says more than 3.5 inches of rain fell onto already-saturated ground in parts of Kansas Monday and overnight, and more is expected Tuesday. New Cambria, a central Kansas town near Salina, asked residents on Monday to voluntarily evacuate for up to 48 hours. Officials say Saline County faces the potential for record flooding along Mulberry Creek near Salina and Smoky Hill River near New Cambria. Pittsburg officials say an apparent tornado touched down south of the city Monday afternoon, damaging outbuildings and knocking down power lines and trees. Roof damage was also reported to Grubbs Hall at Pittsburg State University. No injuries were reported. ___ 6:45 a.m. The National Weather Service says a confirmed tornado has been spotted near the Tulsa International Airport. A tornado warning was issued early Tuesday morning for the area. Forecasters say the tornado is moving to the northeast at about 50 mph (80 kph). The tornado comes as part of a powerful storm system that spawned dozens of tornado sightings Monday and caused significant flash flooding in parts of Oklahoma. The stormy weather is expected to continue Tuesday in eastern Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri and western Illinois. ___ 6:15 a.m. A powerful storm system that spawned dozens of tornado sightings is now causing significant flash flooding in parts of Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Department of Transportation shut down Interstate 40 in El Reno, about 25 miles (40 kilometers) west of Oklahoma City, because of high water Tuesday morning. The National Weather Service says up to 5 inches of rain has fallen since Monday. In Stillwater, emergency responders were rescuing people from their homes because of high water. The Storm Prediction Center had warned of an unusually high risk for severe weather Monday for parts of Oklahoma and Texas. Damage was reported in many areas, including the town of Mangum, but no deaths have been reported. Forecasters say more stormy weather is expected Tuesday, especially in Arkansas, Missouri and western Illinois.
  • Authorities say police visited the motel room of a Texas man suspected of kidnapping an 8-year-old girl but didn't see the child, who was eventually found safe about two hours later. Michael Webb is charged with aggravated kidnapping after authorities say he snatched the girl as she walked with her mother Saturday night in Fort Worth. The child was found early Sunday at the motel in nearby Forest Hill. The Star-Telegram reports Forest Hill officers questioned the man after a motel clerk called police, but they left when they didn't see the child. Officers returned at about 2 a.m. Sunday after receiving another tip and found the girl inside the room. Forest Hill Police Chief Dan Dennis says the department is looking into the officers' handling of the earlier call.
  • Heavy rainfall in Germany has caused widespread flooding, particularly in the south, leaving one person dead. Police in Bavaria said Tuesday that a 44-year-old driver died after losing control of his vehicle on a wet road near the town of Aurach late Monday and crashing into a forest. German news agency dpa reported that the roof of a hospital delivery room collapsed in the northern town of Helmstedt after a drain got blocked. At least three railway lines in southern Germany have been interrupted due to flooded tracks. Officials in several districts are preparing for rivers and streams to spill over their banks as further rain is predicted through Wednesday.
  • What's next for 'Game of Thrones?' The author, whose work was adapted into the HBO series that drew a record-setting numbers of viewers for Sunday's finale, says it's 'been a wild ride.' George RR Martin wrote on Monday that it 'was an ending, but it was also a beginning.' The 70-year-old says he's working on the next installment, 'The Winds of Winter.' He says he knows it's late 'but it will be done.' He's just not saying when. He says 'A Dream of Spring' will follow. Martin says he hears people asking will it have the same ending as the show or will it be different. Martin writes: 'Well. yes. And no.' He says he'll write it, people can read it and then everyone can 'argue about it on the internet.
  • Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver's British restaurant chain has become insolvent, putting 1,300 jobs at risk. The firm said Tuesday that it had gone into administration, a form of bankruptcy protection, and appointed KPMG to oversee the process. The company operates 23 Jamie's Italian restaurants in the U.K. Oliver, known around the world for his cookbooks and television shows, said he was 'deeply saddened by this outcome and would like to thank all of the staff and our suppliers who have put their hearts and souls into this business for over a decade.' He said 'I appreciate how difficult this is for everyone affected.
  • J.C. Penney and Kohl's struggled during the start of the year, raising concern about the challenges for the department store industry ahead. Penney reported a wider than expected loss and sales declines during the first quarter while Kohl's cut its fiscal 2020 profit outlook as it struggled with slumping sales in the quarter. Meanwhile, Home Depot reported better than expected profit and revenue for the first quarter despite a damp start to 2019. That inclement weather and an extra week in the previous fiscal year dragged down the home improvement retailer's comparable store sales. The downbeat reports from the mid-priced department stores, announced Tuesday, were in contrast to Macy's performance, reported last week. Macy's first-quarter profit smashed Wall Street estimates. Macy's also put up its sixth consecutive quarter of increases in comparable store sales — or sales in stores open a year — fueled by its robust online business after a three-year sales slump. But it also said that President Trump's escalating trade war could mean higher prices for Macy's customers. Department stores have been trying to reinvent themselves as more shoppers go online. They've also been hurt by increasing competition from the likes of T.J. Maxx and other off-price stores, which offer coveted brands at discount prices. So, retailers have been offering more exclusive merchandise and expanding online services. Last month, Kohl's said it was expanding is partnership with Amazon, with plans to accept Amazon returns in all of its 1,150 stores starting in July. But apparently, those efforts didn't translate to higher sales. 'The year has started off slower than we'd like, with our first quarter sales coming in below our expectation,' said Michelle Gass, Kohl's CEO in a statement. 'We are actively addressing the opportunities that impacted our first quarter sales, and we have strong initiatives that will enhance our sales performance in the second half.' Penney, meanwhile, has been struggling for several years and is still trying to claw its way back after a disastrous reinvention plan in 2012 by its former CEO Ron Johnson. J.C. Penney Co. reported a quarterly loss of $154 million, or 48 cents per share. Losses, adjusted for one-time gains and costs, came to 46 cents per share. That's worse than the per share loss of 39 cents Wall Street was expecting, according to a survey by Zacks Investment Research. The Plano, Texas-based company's revenue was $2.56 billion, down 5.6%. Same-store sales fell 5.5%. The company attributed part of the sales drop to its move to get rid of major appliances and furniture, which were eating away at profit margins. Kohl's Corp., based in Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin, reported fiscal first-quarter net income of $62 million, or 38 cents per share. Earnings, adjusted for asset impairment costs, came to 61 cents per share, missing the average Street estimate of 67 cents per share. The department store operator posted revenue of $4.09 billion in the period, also falling short of forecasts of $4.2 billion. Kohl's now expects full-year earnings per share earnings in the range of $5.15 to $5.45, down from a previous range of $5.80 to $6.15. Analysts expect $6.03 per share for the year, according to FactSet estimates. Kohl's shares tumbled more than 9%, or $5.62, to $57.29 in premarket trading, while J.C. Penney's shares fell down more than 8%, or 10 cents, to $1.05 per share. _____ Portions of this story were generated by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research. Access a Zacks stock report on JCP at https://www.zacks.com/ap/JCP
  • German authorities are handing over to Israel some 5,000 documents kept by a confidant of Franz Kafka, a trove whose plight could have been plucked from one of the author's surreal stories. The papers being returned Tuesday include a postcard from Kafka from 1910 and personal documents kept by Max Brod, which experts say provide a window into Europe's literary and cultural scene in the early 20th century. They are among some 40,000 documents, including manuscripts, correspondence, notebooks and other writings that once belonged to Brod, which are being brought together again in Israel's National Library. They had ended up in bank vaults in Switzerland and Tel Aviv, a Tel Aviv apartment and in a storage facility in Wiesbaden, Germany, where police found them tucked among forged Russian avant-garde artworks. 'I think he (Kafka) would really be amused,' said National Library archivist and humanities collection curator Stefan Litt, who helped identify the papers recovered in Germany. 'He couldn't invent by himself a better plot.' The documents recovered in Wiesbaden have little to do with Kafka himself, but make the Brod collection complete and shine a light on Brod and his circle, which included Kafka and other writers, Litt said. 'This is an important chapter in Max Brod's estate,' Litt said. 'And it's always good for researchers to have as complete a picture as possible.' Kafka, a Bohemian Jew from Prague who lived for a while in Berlin, was close friends with Brod, himself an accomplished writer. Shortly before his untimely death at 40 of tuberculosis in 1924, Kafka bequeathed his writings to Brod, reportedly telling him to burn them all unread. Instead, Brod published much of the collection, including the novels 'The Trial,' The Castle,' and 'Amerika,' helping to posthumously establish Kafka as one of the great authors of the 20th century. He also brought 'Kafkaesque' into the English language to describe a situation evoking a bizarre, illogical or nightmarish situation like the ones Kafka wrote about. After the Nazis occupied the Sudetenland region of Czechoslovakia in 1938, Brod fled to escape persecution with the entire collection to what was then British-ruled Palestine. When Brod died, he left his personal secretary Esther Hoffe in charge of his literary estate and instructed her to transfer the Kafka papers to an academic institution. Instead, she kept the documents for the next four decades and sold some, like the original manuscript of Kafka's 'The Trial,' which fetched $1.8 million at auction in 1988. She kept some of the items in a bank vault in Tel Aviv, some in Switzerland, and others at her apartment in Tel Aviv. When she died in 2008, the collection went to her two daughters, who fought to keep it but eventually lost a battle in Israel's Supreme Court in 2016. The court sided with the country's National Library, whose lawyers had argued the Kafka papers were 'cultural assets' that belonged to the Jewish people. Both daughters have now died, and the documents stored in Israel have already been transferred to the National Library's care. The documents held in Switzerland should be on their way soon after the National Library won a court case in Zurich last month, which upheld the Israeli verdict and ordered that several safe deposit boxes be opened and their contents shipped to the institution in Jerusalem. But that left the documents in Germany, which had been stolen from Hoffe's apartment about a decade ago. They ended up with an Israeli dealer, who tried in 2013 to sell them to the German Literature Archive in Marbach — the same institution that bought 'The Trial' manuscript at auction in 1988. The German archive instead reported the offer to Israel's National Library, which then got authorities involved, Litt said. The documents resurfaced at the Wiesbaden storage facility of an international forgery ring that produced and sold millions of euros (dollars) worth of forged paintings, which was taken down by German authorities that same year, Litt said. Since then, they have been stored by German authorities as Litt and others sought to confirm their provenance. Those being returned include correspondence between Brod and his wife, and even some of his notebooks from high school, Litt said. 'There's no doubt these materials were part of his papers,' he said. The manuscript of 'The Trial,' however, was properly purchased by the German Literature Archive in the 1988 Sotheby's auction, and the National Library has no claim on it, he said. 'We're happy it's in safe hands,' Litt said.