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    The heat is on. The National Weather Service is warning a large swath of the U.S. of hot weather this weekend, including dangerously high temperatures across the East and Midwest that can threaten the elderly and young children. Temperatures in the mid- to upper 90s and high humidity are expected in many places Saturday and Sunday. Experts are urging people to limit their time outside and drink lots of water. Cities in Vermont and New Hampshire are opening shelters where people can cool off. Some power outages have been reported in Philadelphia and after storms in Michigan's Lower Peninsula. The heat didn't stop Jeffrey Glickman from going for a run Saturday in Washington. He called the weather 'brutal' and says he's not going as far as usual but 'tried to get out early before it gets too hot.
  • Felicity Huffman's co-stars in a new Netflix movie say they found her remorseful about her role in a college admissions scandal. Actress Angela Bassett said Huffman appears ready to take whatever steps are necessary in her case. Patricia Arquette said she believes Huffman feels terrible about her participation in the case. Huffman didn't meet reporters to promote the film 'Otherhood,' which premieres Aug. 2 on Netflix. She pleaded guilty in May to paying $15,000 to a college admissions consultant to have a proctor correct her daughter's answers on the SAT. The film's producer says that Huffman's character portrays a mother who believes that her own actions can make anything possible for her child.
  • Famed Argentine-American architect Cesar Pelli, known for designing some of the world's tallest and most iconic buildings, has died. He was 92. Anibal Bellomio, a senior associate architect at Pelli's Connecticut studio, confirmed Saturday that Pelli died peacefully on Friday at his home in New Haven. Pelli was the former dean of the Yale University School of Architecture and a lecturer at the school, where he received an honorary Doctor of Arts degree. The Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia is one of the Pelli's best-known works. The twin 1,483-foot-tall skyscrapers are among the world's tallest buildings. He is also known for designing the Salesforce Tower in San Francisco and Brookfield Place, formerly the World Financial Center, a downtown Manhattan skyscraper complex. Pelli spoke of architecture's being a social art.
  • The first super-tough 2,000-meter (6,500-foot) climb of the Tour de France proved to be no obstacle for Julian Alaphilippe, the race leader who kept his yellow jersey while defending champion Geraint Thomas struggled up the Tourmalet pass and lost time on Saturday. Thibaut Pinot won Stage 14 up the famed ascent in the Pyrenees, making amends for a disaster on Stage 10, when he lost lots of time. Thomas cracked on the final inclines to the top of the pass and couldn't stay with Pinot and Alaphilippe, who increasingly appears to be justifying French hopes that he could become France's first Tour winner since Bernard Hinault in 1985. 'Since the start of the Tour I had this stage in the back of my mind. The Tournalet, it's mythical,' said Pinot, who now has three career stage wins at cycling's greatest race. Pinot said he's fueled by anger at all the time he squandered on Stage 10, when he was part of a group that got separated from other title contenders in cross-winds. 'I have this rage inside me, because in my opinion it was an injustice,' said Pinot, a podium finisher in 2014. Thomas is still second overall behind Alaphilippe, but the Frenchman is getting further and further away from him. Alaphilippe has put an extra 50 seconds of daylight between him and Thomas in two days after winning the Stage 13 time trial on Friday and, on Saturday, finishing just behind Pinot on the Tourmalet. Alaphilippe now leads the Welshman by 2 minutes, 2 seconds overall. French President Emmanuel Macron, on hand at the top of the Tourmalet to see Pinot win and Alaphilippe extend his lead, gushed about the 'two fantastic riders.' 'They attack and they have heart,' Macron said. ___ More Tour de France coverage: https://apnews.com/TourdeFrance
  • A moonstruck nation celebrated the 50th anniversary of humanity's first footsteps on another world Saturday, gathering in record heat at races and other festivities to commemorate Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin's 'giant leap.' At NASA's Kennedy Space Center, cars were backed up for miles outside the visitor complex at opening time. In Armstrong's hometown of Wapakoneta, Ohio, nearly 2,000 runners competed in 'Run to the Moon' races. 'We're celebrating the 50th anniversary of perhaps the most historic event in my lifetime, maybe in anybody's lifetime, the landing on the moon,' said 10K runner Robert Rocco, 54, of Centerville, Ohio. 'The '60s were very turbulent. But that one bright wonderful moment was the space program.' The Eagle lunar lander, carrying Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969. Armstrong was the first one out, proclaiming for the ages: 'That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.' 'Few moments in our American story spark more pride than the Apollo 11 mission,' President Donald Trump said in a Space Exploration Day message. His statement reiterated the goal of sending astronauts back to the moon within five years and taking 'the next giant leap — sending Americans to Mars.' Armstrong died in 2012, leaving Aldrin, 89, and command module pilot Michael Collins, 88, to mark the golden anniversary. Both astronauts and the Armstrong family met with Trump in the Oval Office on Friday, with Collins pushing for a direct mission to Mars and skipping the moon, and Aldrin expressing dismay at the past few decades of human space exploration. On Saturday, Aldrin and Armstrong's son, Rick, traveled with Vice President Mike Pence to Florida to visit the Apollo 11 launch pad and the building where the astronauts suited up for liftoff on July 16, 1969, now known as the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building. In New York City, organizers moved a moon-landing party from Times Square into a hotel because of the heat wave. Youngsters joined former space shuttle astronaut Winston Scott there, as a giant screen showed the Saturn V rocket lifting off with the Apollo 11 crew in 1969. Countdowns were planned across the country later in the day at the exact moment of the Eagle's landing on the Sea of Tranquility — 4:17 p.m. EDT — and Armstrong's momentous step onto the lunar surface at 10:56 p.m. EDT. The powdered orange drink Tang was back in vogue for the toasts, along with MoonPies, including a 55-pound (25-kilogram), 45,000-calorie MoonPie at Kennedy's One Giant Leap bash. Halfway around the world in the 100-degree heat (38 degrees Celsius) of Kazakhstan, meanwhile, an American, Italian and Russian boarded a Russian rocket for their own liftoff to the International Space Station. Only one of the three — cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov — was alive at the time of Apollo 11. The three already living on the space station also were born long after the moon landings. ___ AP reporter Angie Wang contributed from Wapakoneta, Ohio ___ Follow AP's full coverage of the Apollo 11 anniversary at: https://apnews.com/Apollo11moonlanding ___ The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.
  • Forensic experts have begun studying two sets of bones at a Vatican City cemetery where a missing teenage girl's family was tipped to look for her. A Holy See spokesman, Alessandro Gisotti, said on Saturday that the analyses are being done at the Pontifical Teutonic College, where the bones were found under a stone slab last week. The missing girl, Emanuela Orlandi, vanished in 1983 at age 15 after she left her family's apartment in Vatican City for a music lesson in Rome. Her family' lawyer received an anonymous tip that Emanuela might be buried near the 19th century tombs of two German princesses in the Teutonic College cemetery. The tombs turned out to be empty, but the bones were found during a search of adjoining areas.
  • At first, Tomas Monarrez didn't notice the labels when he went shopping for pots and pans. 'Completely toxin free!' said a big green message on a line of nonstick frying pans in the cookware aisle at a store in the nation's capital. 'No PFOA!' boasted the label on a 12-piece kitchen set. 'Will never release any toxic fumes,' another label promised. 'Oh, wow,' Monarrez, an economist at a think tank, said, when asked if he had ever heard of the toxic chemicals that manufacturers were declaring their products free of. 'I didn't know anything. Should I buy these?' Monarrez asked. 'So all these are bad? Federal regulators are sorting out how to handle health risks from a group of widely used nonstick and stain-resistant compounds. But even reading labels may not be enough to guide consumers who want to limit their exposure to the manmade industrial material, known as perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS. Scientists say there are many steps people can take to minimize their contact with the compounds, which federal toxicologists say show links to health problems. Some changes are simple, such as checking on the safety of your drinking water or buying different pots and pans. Others require spending and lifestyle changes — for example, passing up fast food or other takeout because the containers the food may be packaged in. For those concerned about exposure, there's one critical thing to know about PFAS compounds: 'They're everywhere,' Linda Birnbaum, head of the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, told a recent gathering of her agency's advisory council. 'The carpets and the chairs and maybe the clothes you're wearing,' Birnbaum said. She noted she used to love the ritual of spraying Scotchgard on newly bought tablecloths. No more, she made clear. There are thousands of different versions of the compounds, including PFOA and another early version, both now phased out of production in the U.S. PFAS are used in products including nonstick cookware, but also in stain- and steam-resistant bags for microwave popcorn and many other food containers and packaging, shaving cream, dental floss, stain protection for fabrics and rugs and outdoor garb — for starters. Federal studies of people heavily exposed to the compounds have found links between high blood levels of older kinds of PFAS and a range of health problems, including liver issues, low birth weights, and testicular and kidney cancer. High levels also have been found in many drinking water systems. Military installations that use PFAS-laden firefighting foam and businesses that work with PFAS are two big sources of water contamination. It's probably impossible to avoid all exposures, says Leonardo Trasande, a children's environmental health specialist and vice chair for research at New York University's pediatrics department, and a PFAS expert. But there are 'safe and simple steps to limit exposure based on what we know,' Trasande says. Trasande himself recommends two precautions. One is shunning nonstick cookware in favor of cast iron or stainless steel, Trasande said. That's despite statements from industry and manufacturers that newer forms of PFAS in nonstick cookware are safe. The other is eschewing food packaging as much as possible. In practice, that can require changing habits — cutting your consumption of takeout and packaged food, and committing to cooking more at home, from scratch. 'Literature does suggest that diet is a major route of exposure,' Trasande noted. People also can contact their local water utility to find out if their water system is one of those testing with higher levels of PFAS, Environmental Protection Agency spokeswoman Andrea Drinkard said. Eating certified organic food can guard against PFAS exposure from fields treated with treated human sewage sludge because federal rules prohibit use of the sludge on organically raised crops and livestock, environmental groups say. Older forms of the compounds are known to build up in people's bodies for years. And the chemical bonds holding PFAS compounds together are among the toughest going, so they are expected to take thousands of years to degrade. There's no across the board consensus on whether newer versions of the thousands of kinds of PFAS are safe. Industry says they are and that there's no reason to swear off all nonstick cookware and PFAS-treated food packaging. 'Consumers should have confidence in the safety of products manufactured with today's PFAS because they have been reviewed by regulators globally and found to meet relevant standards that are protective of health and the environment,' Jessica Bowman, executive director of the FluoroCouncil industry trade group, said in an email. 'Studies show that the newer PFAS do not present significant health concerns — they're not carcinogenic and not endocrine disruptors.' Several nonindustry researchers dispute that, and the Food and Drug Administration noted last month studies showing that that newer forms of the nonstick, grease- and water-repelling compounds may also be a health concern.
  • U.S. President Donald Trump said he spoke with Sweden's prime minister Saturday about jailed rapper A$AP Rocky and 'offered to personally vouch for his bail.' Trump tweeted that during a 'a very good call' with Prime Minister Stefan Lofven, he also 'assured him that A$AP was not a flight risk.' The platinum-selling, Grammy-nominated artist has been in custody since early this month over an alleged fight. Urged on by the first lady and celebrities including Kanye West and Kim Kardashian West, the president had said in a Friday tweet that he would intervene to try to free Rocky, whose real name is Rakim May. 'Our teams will be talking further, and we agreed to speak again in the next 48 hours!' Trump wrote Saturday after speaking with Lofven. The Swedish prime minister issued a statement earlier Saturday saying he would be glad to speak with Trump about A$AP Rocky's detention but that his government 'cannot and will not attempt to influence prosecutors or courts.' 'I understand that President Trump has a personal interest in the case....He has expressed the desire for a conversation with me, which is certainly positive,' Lofven said. 'I will explain that the Swedish judicial system is independent. In Sweden, everyone is equal before the law, and this includes visitors from other countries.' Rocky has been behind bars while Swedish police investigate the fight in Stockholm he allegedly was in before appearing at a music festival. Videos published on social media appear to show a person being violently thrown onto the ground by Rocky. A defense lawyer has said it was self-defense. Other recording artists have spoken on his behalf, including Sean 'Diddy' Combs, Justin Bieber, Shawn Mendes, Nicki Minaj and Post Malone.
  • A former Marine who deployed twice to Afghanistan. A patent law professor. A woman who's blind. Two Rhodes scholars. They're among the lawyers starting work this summer as law clerks at the Supreme Court. The group of 16 women and 23 men hired by the justices were already on paths to become leading judges, professors and Supreme Court advocates. The one-year clerkship will cement their high-profile status. 'I think clerking on this court affects everybody's career who does it. ... You put it on your resume and all of a sudden doors open, sometimes justifiably so and sometimes not,' Justice Elena Kagan has said . She should know. Kagan, who clerked for Justice Thurgood Marshall, is one of five current justices who was once a Supreme Court clerk. So was Chief Justice John Roberts. Justices Stephen Breyer, Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh also clerked. Justices hire four clerks annually; retired justices hire one. The clerks review potential cases, help their justice prepare for arguments, conduct research and write draft opinions. Scholars disagree about how much influence the clerks have. But what is clear is that while the justices are the public face of the court, the clerks are their behind-the-scenes assistants who help the place run. Clerks generally decline to give interviews until after their clerkships are over. Even then, they are careful about what they will say. For their work, they're paid about $83,000. When they're done, law firms have recently been offering bonuses of $400,000 to clerks who join them. This year's clerk group is not without some controversy. One Kavanaugh clerk is Sophia Chua-Rubenfeld, whose mother, Yale law professor Amy Chua, wrote a Wall Street Journal article praising Kavanaugh as a mentor to women following his nomination. The article came out before Kavanaugh was accused of a sexual assault alleged to have happened decades ago; he denied the accusation. Chua's article was criticized as self-serving given that her daughter already was in line to clerk for Kavanaugh before President Donald Trump nominated the federal appeals court judge. Another incoming clerk is Clayton Kozinski, who clerked for Kavanaugh at the appeals court and is now working for retired Justice Anthony Kennedy. Kozinski's father, Alex Kozinski, retired abruptly in 2017 from the San Francisco-based 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals following accusations by women, including former law clerks, that he had touched them inappropriately, made lewd comments and shown them pornography. Kozinski said at the time that many of the things being said about him were not true. Justices are looking for different things in their clerks. Top academic credentials are a must. Half the group this year attended law school at Harvard or Yale. Justice Sonia Sotomayor has said she wants clerks 'committed to making a contribution to the world.' Kavanaugh, during his confirmation hearing last year, highlighted his record of hiring female and minority clerks as an appeals court judge. His first group of Supreme Court clerks was all women, a court first. 'There's all sorts of quirky reasons to explain choices,' said law professor Todd Peppers, who wrote a book about clerking and noted that Chief Justice William Rehnquist liked clerks who played tennis. Justice John Marshall Harlan II preferred golfers. While most clerks are relatively recent law school graduates, two Breyer and two Gorsuch clerks are older. One Gorsuch clerk is Notre Dame law professor Stephen Yelderman, who clerked for Gorsuch when Gorsuch was an appeals court judge. The clerks have accomplishments beyond academics. Kagan clerk Jordan Bock rowed at Harvard, where she studied physics, astrophysics and government. Roberts clerk Joseph Falvey served in the Marines. Megan Braun, another Roberts clerk, played college water polo and was a Rhodes scholar. Mark Jia, retired Justice David Souter's clerk, was also a Rhodes scholar. Like other clerks for retired justices, he'll also help a current justice. Justice Clarence Thomas has said he likes to have clerks who come from different parts of the country and from modest backgrounds. He tends to hire clerks who share his conservative legal philosophy. Among his hires this year is Notre Dame graduate Laura Wolk, who lost her eyesight to retinal cancer as a child. Wolk, only the second blind person to clerk at the court, seems to share with Thomas a passionate opposition to abortion. Thomas this year likened abortion to eugenics. Wolk has said that 'even the most severely disabled' can teach others 'about what it means to be human.' Thomas also chose for his team this year James 'Matt' Rice, a law school graduate of the University of California, Berkeley. A catcher at Western Kentucky, he was picked 1,525th — dead last — in the 2010 major league draft but returned to school for his senior year. He signed with Tampa Bay after being chosen in the ninth round the next year and then played two summers in the minor leagues. ___ Follow Jessica Gresko on Twitter at http://twitter.com/jessicagresko
  • President Donald Trump's suggestion that four activist Democratic congresswomen of color 'go back' to countries 'from which they came' has excited some in his political base. Yet in many of America's workplaces and institutions, the same language would be unacceptable and possibly illegal. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which enforces federal laws against workplace bias, explicitly cites comments like 'go back to where you came from' as examples of 'potentially unlawful conduct.' Similar phrases routinely show up in lawsuits that the EEOC files against employers alleging discrimination, harassment or retaliation based on race or national origin. Apart from its legality in workplaces, Trump's language has ignited impassioned responses across racial, ethnic and political divides. 'It wasn't Racist!' tweeted Terrence Williams, a black comedian who supports Trump. 'No matter what color you are YOU can go back home or move if you don't like America.' By contrast, Rachel Timoner, a senior rabbi at a Reform Jewish synagogue in Brooklyn, said such language would never be tolerated among members of her congregation. 'I'd want to sit down with them and ask them, where that's coming from?' she said. 'If a person persistently degraded other human beings, I would need to say to them they could no longer participate. It's really important for us to create an environment where people of color and people of all identities feel welcome.' Facing an uproar from critics accusing him of racism, Trump has insisted that he wasn't being racist when he tweeted this week that the four Democratic members of Congress — all but one of them born in the United States — 'originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe.' Trump urged them to 'go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came.' Rather, his message, the president explained the next day was: 'If you hate our country, if you're not happy here, you can leave.' Yet Trump's exhortation for the four minority congresswomen to 'go back' to their countries of origin, if uttered by an employee in a workplace, could constitute a firing offense or cause for a costly lawsuit. Sam P. Israel, a New York lawyer who handles harassment cases, noted that plaintiffs usually must prove that an offensive comment wasn't made in isolation but as part of a broader hostile environment. If Trump were an employer facing a lawsuit, Israel said, there would arguably be enough examples to suggest a pattern of racially or ethnically disparaging remarks. 'All of those things are actionable if you have enough of them, and it could be illegal,' Israel said. 'The EEOC teaches that all of these things are bad and should be avoided, and the president is making a mockery of it.' In the aftermath of Trump's 'go back' tweet, a suburban Chicago gas station clerk was fired after a video posted on social media appeared to show him telling Hispanic customers to 'go back to their country.' Stephen Kalghorn, general counsel for the parent company of Bucky's Mobil gas station in Naperville, said the employee's comments couldn't be clearly heard on a surveillance video. But he was fired for engaging in a verbal confrontation with the customers. Elizabeth Tippett, a professor at the University of Oregon School of Law, suggested that Trump's comments could make things worse for anyone who tried to echo him in a workplace. Tippett explained that the president's rhetoric would make it difficult to argue that a similar comment was made innocuously or out of ignorance of its racist connotations. 'When you have these cultural environments, you might see repeated comments from multiple people,' she said. 'The more frequent the comments are, the stronger the harassment claim.' Most Republican leaders have declined to characterize Trump's comments as racist. And a few supporters have parroted his remarks, including some at a Trump rally in North Carolina this week who chanted 'send her back!' in reference to Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota. Donna Givens, an African-American neighborhood organizer who leads the Eastside Community Network in Detroit, said Trump's tweets were deeply hurtful. 'It immediately reminded me of being a child and being told to 'go back to Africa, (n-word)' — that got said to me repeatedly,' she said. 'My grandmother used to tell me to tell them to 'go back to their caves in Europe.' ' In light of the inflammatory rhetoric, 'I don't think that we can pretend like the American workplace is a safe place for immigrants, for people of color or for women,' Givens said. 'The president has a bully pulpit. And the president sets the tone. And so there are people who feel justified in their hatreds now.' Andrew Pappas, a self-described conservative Republican who holds elective office in Anderson Township, Ohio, acknowledged that Trump's language, taken in a vacuum, was 'not appropriate.' Yet he expressed some understanding of it. 'I think that when you see Donald Trump react in a human way, it upsets a lot of people that are expecting maybe your true quintessential politician,' Pappas said. 'But it also resonates exponentially with the common American who says, 'You know what? I'd react that way, too.' ' The Rev. Tom Lambrecht, general manager of the conservative United Methodist magazine Good News, cautioned against any rush to declare certain forms of political rhetoric unacceptable 'The difficulty here is, who decides what is unacceptable?' Lambrecht said by email. 'And how is that unacceptability enforced? Censorship?' 'At the same time,' he added, 'such despicable rhetoric is a teachable moment. It is incumbent upon Christians and others of good will to call out racism when we hear it in public debate or private conversation and to teach our children and grandchildren what is wrong with such attitudes.' Another pastor, E.W. Lucas of Friendship Baptist Church in Appomattox, Virginia, has firmly backed Trump, even posting sign outside the church declaring 'America: Love or Leave It,' explicitly echoing the president. 'People that feel hard about our president and want to down the president and down the country ... they ought to go over there and live in these other countries for a little while,' Lucas told ABC 13 in Lynchburg. Some advocates of free speech argued that censorship of political rhetoric should never be the solution, suggesting that there were better ways to combat it. 'Every American has the right to make up his or her own mind about what public officials say and how they say it —and if enough people disagree with a politician, they have the right make those opinions known in peaceful protest, or at the ballot box,' said Robert Shibley, executive director of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education. 'Censorship of political speech only serves to rob citizens of the right to make up their own minds, which is fatal to a democratic society.' Chris Finan, executive director of the National Coalition Against Censorship, agreed that attempts to ban racist rhetoric 'will never solve the problem.' Instead, Finan said, 'It has to be challenged and refuted wherever it occurs.' Retired college football coach Bill Curry, who grew up in the segregated South, had some advice based on playing in the NFL under legends Vince Lombardi at Green Bay and Don Shula in Baltimore. 'One racist word out of your month and you were gone,' said Curry, 76. 'It didn't matter who you were. Period.' During college coaching stints at the University of Alabama and elsewhere, Curry followed the same policy. 'When you put down those rules like those great coaches did, it doesn't become a problem,' he said. 'You cannot let that racist thing get started. It will destroy unity, just like is going on in our country now.' ___ AP video journalist Angie Wang in Cincinnati and AP writers Leanne Italie in New York, Jay Reeves in Birmingham, Alabama, and Corey Williams and Mike Householder in Detroit contributed to this report.