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    The NFL has passed a new rule for this season that says any player who initiates contact with his helmets is subject to ejection after an in-game video review that will be decided in New York. Al Riveron, the league's head of officiating, said a foul can be called regardless of where on the body — not just the head or neck area — that one player hits another with his helmet. The rule is not position-specific, so offensive players will be subject to the same criteria as defensive players. 'This is about eliminating unnecessary use of the helmet,' Riveron said Tuesday at the NFL spring meetings. If a player is ejected, Riveron and his staff in New York will use network camera angles to determine if the ejection is necessary. He promised that games will not become 'an ejection fest' every week. 'Immediately when I learn in New York that there's an ejection, I will ask the network to give me everything you've got,' Riveron said. 'I will take a look at it, I will rule on it and I will say yes, he's ejected, (or) no, leave him in the game. 'Play will stop, and we will expedite it. That's why we won't have the referee come over and we're not going to get the replay official involved,' Riveron said. 'The only way the replay official will be involved is he will call it and immediately tell the command center, we have an ejection on 'No. 22 White.'' Atlanta Falcons CEO Rich McKay, the head of the league's competition committee, said the league had conference calls and a webinar with every coaching staff in the league last week to tell them to begin teaching a new, safer technique. McKay said the rule passed after the league looked at tens of thousands of examples on film to determine how to reduce concussions. Contact that's made by leading with the helmet no longer has a place in the NFL. 'We have always learned don't put your neck at risk and everything else,' he said. 'Now we've taken it a step further and said that we need to teach it out of the game and put a rule in and get it out of the game.' The rule applies to linemen, too. They can no longer lower their helmets to initiate contact. 'It's a culture change, and it's something that we take full responsibility' for, Riveron said. 'Prior to training camp we will have position-specific videos done by head coaches such as offensive line play, defensive line play, defensive backs, linebackers, special teams, runners. Why? Because this rule is all-inclusive for all players in all parts of the field.' ___ For more AP NFL coverage: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • The Latest on the eruption of Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island (all times local): 12:55 p.m. Lava flowing from Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island has claimed another structure, this one close to a geothermal plant. Hawaii County civil defense officials say lava from an active fissure has destroyed an old warehouse that was used in early research and development at the Puna Geothermal plant. Hawaii County spokeswoman Janet Snyder tells the Honolulu Star-Advertiser that the warehouse adjacent to the plant was destroyed late Monday night. The building was owned by the state of Hawaii. Nearly 50 structures have been destroyed by lava, including dozens of homes. ___ 12: 27 p.m. Authorities in Hawaii are racing to close off production wells at a geothermal plant threatened by a lava flow from Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island. Workers are capping the 11th and last well at the plant to prevent toxic gases from wafting out after lava entered, then stalled, on the property near one of the new volcanic vents. Hawaii County officials say lava from active fissures near the Puna plant has destroyed an old warehouse site that was used in early research and development. Puna Geothermal, owned by Nevada's Ormat Technologies, was shut down earlier this month shortly after Kilauea began spewing lava on May 3. The plant harnesses heat and steam from the earth's core to spin turbines to generate power, providing for about 25 percent of the island's daily energy demand. Earlier this month, officials removed 50,000 gallons (190,000 liters) of the gas from the plant to reduce the chance of explosions. ___ 6:15 a.m. There have been two new small explosive eruptions at the summit of Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island. Ash plumes late Monday afternoon and early Tuesday morning didn't exceed 10,000 feet (3,048 meters), officials say any danger from ash fallout would be near the summit or to the communities to the southwest of wind carries the plume that way. U.S. Geological Survey geophysicist Mike Poland says there are near continuous low-level ash emissions from the summit. He says that pattern 'is about par for the course' right now. Besides explosive eruptions from the summit, Kilauea is oozing lava into neighborhoods about 25 miles (40 kilometers) away. Some lava over the weekend began flowing into the ocean and generated plumes of lava haze. That prompted safety warnings about toxic gas on the Big Island's southern coastline. ___ 12 a.m. The eruption of Kilauea volcano in Hawaii sparked new safety warnings about toxic gas on the Big Island's southern coastline after lava began flowing into the ocean and setting off a chemical reaction. The molten rock started pouring into the sea over the weekend. It's been generating plumes of lava haze or 'laze' as it interacts with seawater. It's just the latest hazard from a weeks-old eruption that has so far generated earthquakes and featured gushing molten rock, giant ash plumes and sulfur dioxide. The eruption has destroyed more than 40 buildings forced more than 2,000 people to evacuate. On Monday, lava entered and then stalled on the property of a geothermal plant near one of Kilauea's new volcanic vents.
  • The Latest on primaries on Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky and Texas (all times local): 6:25 p.m. Hillary Clinton is urging Democrats in Georgia to support Stacey Abrams for governor. Clinton recorded a 60-second endorsement used by the Abrams campaign in direct phone calls to Georgia voters. Tuesday's primary ballot election has Abrams facing fellow Atlanta Democrat Stacey Evans. Clinton notes Abrams was the first black woman to serve as House Democratic leader in the Georgia legislature. Clinton also says Abrams has 'a proven track record' of supporting public schools, gun safety, voting rights and Medicaid expansion. A victory in the Democratic primary and in the November election would make Abrams the first black woman governor in the U.S. Clinton's message also acknowledges the potential confusion caused by two Democratic rivals with the same first name. Twice, Clinton urges voters to support 'Abrams with an 'A.'' __ 6 p.m. Polls in eastern Kentucky have closed on another multi-state primary day ahead of the November midterms. Arkansas and Georgia also are holding primaries. Texas has runoffs after an initial round of voting in March. Georgia Democrats are set to nominate a woman for governor for the first time in state history. Republicans in the state are likely going to have a runoff that some in the party fear could be a harmful turn to the right. Kentucky voters in one county could choose a gay man to run against the clerk who denied him a same-sex marriage license. Texas has Democratic runoffs in three districts that will be key to determining House control in the new Congress. __ 6 a.m. Four states are casting ballots Tuesday as the 2018 midterm elections take shape. Voters in Arkansas, Georgia and Kentucky hold primaries, while Texans settle several primary runoffs after their first round of voting in March. Texans will settle an all-female congressional runoff between liberal activist Laura Moser and Houston attorney Lizzie Fletcher in a Houston-area House race that has become a proxy for the Democratic Party's battle over style and substance. In Georgia, Democrats will tap either Stacey Abrams or Stacey Evans as the state's first female nominee for governor from either major party. Georgia's Republican candidates for governor have engaged in a sprint to the right on everything from immigration to bear-hugging Trump.
  • After working a quarter-century in the NHL, including two decades in management, Paul Fenton finally has the opportunity to run a team. The new general manager of the Minnesota Wild has been tasked with retooling a roster that has produced a consistent regular season winner but, more importantly, scant success in the playoffs. 'I'm confident we have a very good team in Minnesota and believe Paul shares that same belief. The goal remains to bring a Stanley Cup to the state of hockey,' owner Craig Leipold said. 'No pressure, Paul, but that is where it starts.' The 58-year-old Fenton was introduced on Tuesday at Xcel Energy Center, where the Wild have reached the postseason six straight times to match the longest streak in the Western Conference with the Anaheim Ducks. The problem is they've won only two series during that run, both in the first round. That's why Leipold dismissed Chuck Fletcher after nine seasons and, after a month of interviewing and considering candidates, turned to Fenton for a fresh perspective . 'As we went through the process, we kept hearing good things about our team,' Leipold said. 'We kept feeling better and better, and it really reinforced what we thought. This is not a rebuild. It's a tweaking.' Existing contracts essentially make a teardown impossible. Center Mikko Koivu, left wing Zach Parise and defenseman Ryan Suter accounted for almost 30 percent of the Wild's salary cap in 2017-18. Koivu's two-year extension kicks in this summer. Parise and Suter are signed for seven more seasons. All three players attended the news conference, as did coach Bruce Boudreau and several holdover hockey operations staffers. 'It obviously doesn't need to be overhauled,' Fenton said. 'We have a lot of really good veteran pieces, young guys that are coming, and I'm just looking forward to trying to put on some finishing touches to help us win.' Even without no-trade clauses, the Koivu-Parise-Suter core would be difficult to move with their current deals. There are plenty of other valuable players that Fenton could use as assets in trades, though, and there's precedent for him doing just that. During his 12-year tenure as assistant general manager of the Nashville Predators, Fenton teamed with general manager David Poile to pull off several bold moves. They shipped Shea Weber to the Montreal Canadiens for P.K. Subban in a swap of standout defensemen two summers ago after sending defenseman Seth Jones to the Columbus Blue Jackets for center Ryan Johansen about six months earlier, deals that set the stage for the Predators to reach the Stanley Cup finals in 2017. They had the best record in the league in the 2017-18 regular season. Fenton declined to make any evaluations or proclamations about the Wild during his session with reporters, but he did give a definitive answer to a question about whether he'd keep the aggressive approach to trading. 'I like to think outside the box,' he said, later adding: 'I'll look at small trades. I'll look at big trades. Whatever is going to improve this organization going forward to give us a chance to win the Stanley Cup, we're going to look.' As for feeling limited by the Koivu-Parise-Suter contract situation he inherited, well, if he was daunted by it he wouldn't have been hired. 'Everybody has the same problem,' Fenton said. 'We're all cap driven.' Fenton was accompanied by his wife, Nona, who was once his high school sweetheart in Massachusetts, and his two adult sons, P.J. and Owen, and daughter-in-law Stefanie. There's a granddaughter in the family as well. Suter was a familiar face to Fenton in the crowd, too. The Predators drafted him in the first round in 2003 while Fenton was director of player personnel. Leipold owned the Predators then, too. 'We have mutual friends that say good things about each other, so I don't think it's going to be a difficult transition at all,' said Boudreau, who will enter his third season with the Wild. 'We're hockey guys, and when we're getting together we're going to be talking hockey all the time. That's what we love to do. He spent a lot of years looking at the minors. I've been a lot of years in the minors. I think it should end up being a really good relationship.' ___ For more AP NHL coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/NHLhockey
  • The Mets have signed free agent Jose Bautista, getting the former home run champion two days after he was cut by the Atlanta Braves. They made the move before playing Miami on Tuesday night. The team said he was available for the game, but he was not in the starting lineup they posted. New York listed Bautista as an outfielder. He played only third base in his short stint with Atlanta, starting at the spot eight times. He hit .143 (5 for 35) with two home runs and five RBIs, and fared well against left-handed pitchers. The 37-year-old Bautista signed for the $545,000 major league minimum. He hit .203 with 23 homers and 65 RBIs in 157 games last season with Toronto, and went unsigned as a free agent during the winter. Bautista is a six-time All-Star, and led the AL with 54 homers in 2010 and 43 in 2011. He has hit at least 20 home runs in each of the past eight seasons. The Mets optioned infielder-outfielder Phillip Evans to Triple-A Las Vegas. ___ More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball
  • James Hinchcliffe once likened Indianapolis Motor Speedway to a cruel mistress. A few days ago, he found out just how cruel when he was bumped from the race that means the most to him — and really, any IndyCar driver. One of the circuit's most popular competitors and a likely contender for the overall championship, Hinchcliffe and his No. 5 car did not make the field for Sunday's Indianapolis 500. But he isn't expressing any animosity toward the 2 1/2 mile oval, however. Nothing even close. 'The Indianapolis Motor Speedway is a tricky track, a very temperamental track,' 31-year-old Canadian star said Tuesday. 'It is super sensitive to weather and car setup. You can have a perfectly good car one day and roll it in the garage, and the next morning roll out the same car and the thing is trying to kill you. 'And then the event itself, just the way the month goes, you have these good days, you have these bad days, and qualifying is super unique and super stressful. And then you have the race itself, it's the biggest deal in racing. 'It is interesting, you get so emotionally tied to that race it can be a bit cruel at times.' Hinchcliffe was the first driver out Saturday after a 2-hour, 20-minute rain delay that changed the conditions. His four-lap average of 224.784 mph was far slower than anyone anticipated. With a large group of drivers waiting to get through the qualifying line and another 51-minute rain delay, nobody got a second chance until the final hour. As Hinchcliffe's car sat in the second qualifying lane — designated for cars attempting to improve their time without withdrawing their speed — Conor Daly bumped him from the race. His team then scrambled to push him to the front of the first lane, those designated for cars withdrawing times or with no time, so he could go first. When he finally did get on the track, a vibration forced him right back to the pits. He never got another shot. 'It is crazy to think the last three years we have gone from missing the race with an injury to being on the pole to now not even being in the show,' Hinchcliffe said. 'It is crazy what a relatively short amount of time can do in terms of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. 'This sport in general has a lot of highs and a lot of lows. As a driver — I think as an athlete in any sport — you learn how to deal with those things. Indy is just so special to us that the good days are extra special and the bad days hurt a little bit more.' Hinchcliffe will be at the track Sunday, helping Indy 500 teammates Robert Wickens, Jay Howard and Jack Harvey in any way possible. He will honor commitments with Arrow, his main sponsor, and other partners, and recognizes there will be media requests. Those he will be considering on a 'case-by-case basis,' but he has no idea what emotions he will be feeling. Well, actually, he does. 'I expect Sunday to be one of the hardest days in my career, to be honest,' Hinchcliffe said. 'The difference of watching in 2015 was I couldn't physically do it if I wanted to, and frankly didn't really feel much like doing it that day. This time I am very physically capable and very much want to be doing it, so it's going to be tough. 'I got to put on a brave face. I am not running away, I am going to the track, I am going to support my team. Robbie is in his first 500, Jack and Jay have been a big addition to the team for a month, have been very helpful. I am just going to go there and do what I can for the team and the greater good, and try to get one of our cars home in victory lane.' Ah, victory lane. In a weird way, being bumped from this race could have a side benefit for Hinchcliffe and his team. No, they aren't likely to be in the championship chase after getting zero points at Indy. But their approach for the rest of the 2018 schedule could be impacted by this weekend's idleness. 'I think for us as a team, that's all we can do is really buckle down and use this as motivation,' he said. 'Not that our team needed any. It's a great group of people, a very competitive group of people, and we've actually had a really strong start to the year. 'For a championship point of view, missing a double points race is about as big a blow as you can get. So that definitely stings. But at the same time if you are no longer really thinking about the points, you might be willing to take extra risks strategy-wise during races and go for those wins. That's really where the focus goes for the rest of the season.
  • A longtime business partner of President Donald Trump's personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, has pleaded guilty to tax fraud in a deal that requires him to cooperate in any ongoing investigations. New York City taxi magnate Evgeny Freidman entered the guilty plea on Tuesday at a court in Albany. A person briefed on the plea deal says Freidman agreed to cooperate with federal or state authorities. The person wasn't authorized to publicly discuss the case and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. State prosecutors charged Freidman last year with pocketing $5 million in state taxes on taxis he managed. For years he's managed hundreds of cabs, including more than two dozen owned by Cohen. Cohen's business dealings are under investigation by federal prosecutors in New York. Cohen's lawyer hasn't returned a message.
  • A law professor put forward as Italy's next premier faced suspicions Tuesday that he overstated his academic credentials, including referring on his resume to seven summers of studies at New York University that turned out to involve only having library privileges there. The 12-page resume covering the years since Guiseppe Conte earned his law degree from Rome's Sapienza University in 1988 includes entries for time spent at an array of top universities in the United States, Britain and France, without specifying the courses or areas of research he undertook. The curriculum vitae states that Conte, 53, 'stayed' at Paris Sorbonne University in 2000 and Cambridge University's Girton College in 2001 for scientific research. The resume also states he 'perfected and updated his studies' at New York University during the summers of 2008-2014. In a statement Tuesday, New York University said records showed that Conte had 'no official status' at the school, but 'was granted permission to conduct research in the NYU Law library' during the same years listed on his resume. University spokeswoman Michelle Tsai added that Conte also 'invited an NYU Law professor to serve on the board of an Italian law journal.' Conte did not respond Tuesday to the speculation he padded his official resume, which was submitted to the Italian parliament in 2013. The 5-Star Movement, one of the populist forces that proposed the University of Florence professor without political experience as premier, offered a vigorous defense. Conte 'never boasted' of holding degrees from foreign universities, but 'stayed abroad to study, enrich his knowledge and perfect his juridical English. For a professor of his level, the opposite would have been strange,' the movement said. Cambridge declined to confirm an affiliation with Conte, citing privacy, and the Sorbonne didn't immediately respond to queries. The resume also says Conte studied at the International Kultur Institut in Vienna in 1993. No school responding to that name could be located in Vienna, but a language school called the Internationales Kulturinstitut declined to comment, citing privacy issues. Conte's CV further notes that he taught a course in European contract and banking law at the University of Malta during the summer of 1997. The University of Malta said Tuesday it has no record of Conte 'ever forming part of the resident academic staff,' but added that 'he may have been involved in lecturing duties during short courses organized in the summer of 1997' by a now-defunct foundation that worked with the university. Analyst Wolfango Piccoli, co-founder of Teneo Intelligence, said he didn't expect an exaggerated resume to necessarily affect Italian President Sergio Mattarella's deliberations over whether to formally tap Conte to form a government. 'Embellishing resumes is sport in Italy,' Piccoli said, adding that 'only an academic would have a 12-page CV.' Political observers in Italy think a bigger issue for Conte is persuading the president he would have the independence to lead a coalition government composed of the 5-Stars and the anti-immigrant League, and not just be an executor of the populists' wishes. The 5-Stars began circulating Conte's name as a possible Cabinet minister several months ago, but he never participated in the elections or in the drafting of the government program he would be expected to carry out as premier. He surfaced as a possible candidate to lead the Italian government after 5-Star leader Luigi Di Maio and League leader Matteo Salvini agreed over the weekend not to fight each other for the job. Paola Lucarelli, a professor of business law at the University of Florence, where Conte currently teaches, said Conte would bring to a new government 'his ability to mediate, a gift that maybe is not very common in politics.' Conte also has solid institutional Catholic credentials. He taught at the Vatican-affiliated LUMSA university in the mid-1990s and has close ties with Cardinal Achille Silvestrini, one of the behind-the-scenes power brokers in the Italian church and at the Vatican. During his university years in Rome, Conte lived at the Holy See-affiliated Villa Nazareth, a residential college that provides low-income students with a place to live in the Italian capital while they pursue their studies. Conte was precisely the type of motivated but economically disadvantaged Italians that Villa Nazareth sought out, said Nicholas Cafardi, a canon lawyer at Duquesne University, which has an exchange program with Villa Nazareth. 'He's a 'pull-himself-up-by-his-bootstraps' type,' Cafardi said. 'He's gotten where he is today because of very, very hard work.' While at Villa Nazareth, Conte became friends with Silvestrini, the cardinal who runs the residence, and then went on to become one of his lawyers. Cafardi said he met Conte in 1992 when Silvestrini and Conte visited the United States to set up a fundraising foundation, since disbanded, for Villa Nazareth. 'He's a great guy,' Cafardi said. 'I feel like he's walking in the lion's den with Salvini and Di Maio, but we'll see.' ___ Nicole Winfield in Rome, Francesco Fedelli in Florence, Sylvie Corbet in Paris, Jill Lawless in London and Stephen Calleja in Valletta, Malta, contributed to this report.
  • The Latest on legislation to roll back rules for banks (all times local): 5:45 p.m. Congress has moved to dismantle some key rules for banks that were installed to prevent a replay of the 2008 financial crisis. The House voted 258-159 to approve legislation rolling back the landmark Dodd-Frank law, sending the bill to President Donald Trump. He is poised to sign it into law to deliver on a campaign pledge of gutting Dodd-Frank. The Republican-led bill, which already cleared the Senate in March, garnered votes from some House Democrats. The legislation increases fivefold, to $250 billion in assets, the threshold at which banks are deemed so big and plugged into the financial grid that if one were to fail it would cause major havoc. Those banks currently are subject to stricter capital and planning requirements. __ 3:30 p.m. Congress was taking a final step Tuesday toward dismantling a chunk of the rules framework for banks installed to prevent a recurrence of the 2008 financial crisis that brought millions of lost jobs and foreclosed homes. The House planned to approve legislation to roll back the Dodd-Frank law, easing rules for banks and notching a legislative win for President Donald Trump, who made gutting the landmark law a campaign promise. The Republican legislation, pushed by Wall Street banks as well as regional banks and smaller institutions, carries bipartisan support.
  • An anti-abortion activist who shot and wounded a Kansas abortion provider and firebombed clinics in Oregon and elsewhere has been released from prison to a halfway house to finish her sentence. The Federal Correctional Institution in Waseca, Minnesota, confirmed Tuesday that Rachelle 'Shelley' Shannon has been sent to a halfway house where she will complete a 20-year sentence stemming from two Oregon cases for arson and other crimes targeting abortion clinics. Her final release date is Nov. 7. Shannon has already completed an 11-year sentence for shooting Wichita abortion provider Dr. George Tiller in 1993. Tiller was killed by an anti-abortion extremist who admired Shannon in 2009. Tiller's clinic was purchased by Trust Women. Its founder, Julie Burkhart, says Shannon's release raises concerns about the safety of clinic workers.