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Events

    If you'd like to get the family out and about this weekend in metro Atlanta, there’s plenty to do. Special swimming, hiking, running and tubing activities are just some of the offerings, and you'll also be able to relax with music or a movie if that's more your speed. » RELATED: Best festivals in Atlanta inJuly Check out the following 16 things to do this weekend in metro Atlanta: Cobb Railroad Rendezvous. 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, July 20. $10 adults, $8 seniors 65 and up, $5 military/student and kids 3-17, free for children 2 and under. $5 for Board the General, $10 for iron pour block. Southern Museum, 2829 Cherokee St., Kennesaw. 770-427-2117. https://www.southernmuseum.org. Attend a live iron pour and take your design home. The event also features model trains, crafts for kids, and a Piston Workshop, where you can build our own piston-powered machine. You can also 'Board the General' locomotive and have your photo taken. Civil War Collectors Showcase. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, July 20. $5. Kennesaw State University Civil War Center Room 400, 3333 Busbee Drive, Kennesaw. 470-578-6765. https://calendar.kennesaw.edu. Some of the country's top collectors of Civil War items will show and explain some of their most unique items. These include original Abraham Lincoln memorabilia, weapons, maps, portraits, and more. 'Shrek the Musical.' 7 p.m. Friday, July 19 and 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday, July 20. $12-$15. Smyrna First United Methodist Church, 1315 Concord Road, Smyrna. 770-436-4108, ext. 214. https://www.smyrnavillageplayers.com. The Smyrna Village Players' performance of the new age fairytale brings the heroes into modern times. ASL interpretation will be offered at Saturday's 2 p.m. matinee. Gentlemen of Soul. 7 p.m.-10 p.m. Saturday, July 20. $45. Mable House Barnes Amphitheatre, 5239 Floyd Road, Mableton. 770-819-3285. https://mablehouse.org. Enjoy music from the Gentlemen of Soul featuring Peabo Bryson, Freddie Jackson, and Howard Hewett. DeKalb Interpretive and Recreational Hike. 8 a.m.-11 a.m. Friday, July 19. Free. Davidson-Arabia Mountain Nature Center, 3787 Klondike Road, Lithonia. 770-484-3060 or ArabiaRanger@gmail.com to register. Arabiaalliance.org. Learn about the natural and cultural resources of Arabia Mountain and take in beautiful views. The ranger-led hike is moderate and lasts about one to two hours. Bring a refillable water bottle and snacks. Dive into Shabbat. 5 p.m.-7 p.m. Friday, July 19. MJCCA Outdoor Pool and Splash Pad, 5342 Tilly Mill Road, Dunwoody. 678-812-4161. https://www.atlantajcc.org. Celebrate Shabbat by bringing a picnic or potluck items to share with friends at this public event. Open swim will start at 5 p.m. followed by Shabbat songs and blessings at 6 p.m. Ice pops, challah, and grape juice are free. » RELATED: Cool off this summer with these 7 wet adventures near Atlanta 'Little Women.' 7:30 p.m. Friday, July 19 and Saturday, July 20 and 2:30 p.m. Sunday, July 21, plus additional dates. $10-$15. Tucker Recreation Center, 4898 LaVista Road, Tucker. http://www.tuckertheatre.com. The ageless story of 'Little Women' is presented in a nontraditional, diverse production. Summer Pops Concerts. 8 p.m.-10 p.m. Friday, July 19. $10-$32. Cole Auditorium, Fine Arts Building CF Perimeter College at Georgia State University – Clarkston campus, 3735 Memorial College Ave., Clarkston. 678-891-3565. https://dekalbsymphony.org. The DeKalb symphony orchestra, featuring pianist Robert Strickland and his trio, will perform 'Music from the Stage and Screen - big & small.' North Fulton Music at Twilight. 8:30 p.m. Friday, July 19. Free. Old Milton Park, corner of Milton Avenue and N. Main Street, downtown Alpharetta. https://www.alpharetta.ga.us. J. Scott Thompson will perform songs using his powerful voice and easygoing personality. His inspiration comes from James Brown, Sam Cooke, The Beatles, and Otis Redding. Roswell Farmers & Artisans Market. 8 a.m.-noon. Saturday, July 20. Free admission. City Hall, 38 Hill St., Roswell. http://roswellfam.com/. Browse through local products, enjoy music, check out the popup library, take part in a pie contest, and more. Family Movie Series. Movie starts at dark. Saturday, July 20. Free admission. Riverside Park, 575 Riverside Road, Roswell. 770-594-6158. https://www.roswellgov.com/government/departments/recreation-and-parks/news-events/free-movies. Bring lawn chairs, blanket, and snacks. You can also buy food and drink at the concession stand. Kids can romp on the playground before you all settle in to watch 'Mary Poppins Returns.' Summer Choral Project concert. 6 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Sunday, July 21. $10. Johns Creek United Methodist Church, 11180 Medlock Bridge Road, Johns Creek. https://www.eventbrite.com. The Summer Choral Project will be joined by the Orpheus Men's Ensemble for this concert. Gwinnett Whatever Floats Your Boat. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, July 20. Free admission, fee for renting tubes, etc. and mandatory life vests. Rogers Bridge Park, 4291 Rogers Bridge Road, Duluth. https://www.duluthga.net. Tube down the Chattahoochee with your own or a rental tube, raft, kayak, or stand up paddle board. You can also stay in the park for music, food, inflatables, rock climbing, and more. Click here to reserve a vessel. Movie on the Lawn. 8 p.m. Friday, July 19. Free. Lawrenceville Lawn, 210 Luckie St., Lawrenceville. https://www.lawrencevillega.org. Bring a lawn chair or blanket and let the family watch 'A Dog's Way Home.' Stamp & Scrapbook Expo. 9 a.m. early bird and 10 a.m. general-6 p.m. Friday, July 19 and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, July 20. $8-$15 with extra charges for some special events. Infinite Energy Center, exhibit halls A-C, 6400 Sugarloaf Parkway, Duluth. 888-252-3976. https://scrapbookexpo.com/. See new products and designs, learn new techniques, and swap ideas with other card makers, stampers, and scrapbook enthusiasts. Frozen/Elf/Broadway in the Park 5K/1K/Fun Run. 7 a.m. and 8 a.m. start times. Saturday, July 20. $15-$30. Suwanee Town Center Park, 330 Town Center Ave. NW, Suwanee. https://runsignup.com. This family-friendly run features medals for a variety of ages, including ones for the first stroller and first dog to cross the line. It's a fundraiser for future Broadway in the Park performances that will take place Suwanee Town Center. » RELATED: 6 Atlanta summer date ideas for the budget-conscious 
  • Wyatt began his treatment for PLTD at AFLAC when he was 10-years-old. Wyatt is a heart transplant patient and gets routine labs. He had some labs come back with results that were very unusual for him. He was admitted at Egelston to find the source and referred to Aflac when he was diagnosed with stage 3 Large B Cell Lymphoma (PTLD). Wyatt has spent a lot of time on the Aflac floor inpatient since his diagnosis. Besides getting inpatient chemo he has had several complications including fevers, anemia, BK virus and severe mucositis. >>More from WSB Radio 2019 Care-a-Thon
  • Teryn was born with Sickle Cell Anemia. We found out at 3 months old. She was hospitalized for the first time at 6 months. Teryn rode in an ambulance alone to the hospital. She laughed and smiled while her mom and grandma cried; she thought it was funny. The ambulance driver said she smiled the whole time. Sickle Cell affects Teryn mostly in her lungs, exasperating her asthma.  At seven years old she coded after a surgery on her tonsils and adenoids. She was put in ICU and had a brain injury which she could not remember her numbers, alphabets, put on clothes, shoes, etc. She rose above all of this to become an A/B student, honor roll in the gifted program. In 2017, she developed germ cell cancer and had to have a tumor removed.  >>More from WSB Radio 2019 Care-a-Thon
  • Current treatment plans are follow-up MRI scans every four months at SR followed by a meeting with Dr. Mazewski at the Aflac cancer center for results and physical evaluation. Neuro-psychology evals annually to look for any changes in cognitive functioning w Dr. Burns at SR.  Lilia is currently not taking any medication and Saville is on twice daily medication for her continued discomfort due to neuropathy in her feet caused by the chemotherapy drugs.  Article form Midtown Life Publication - July 25, 2017  It’s said the bond between sisters is unbreakable. That holds true for the Sullivan sisters who are three years apart, have strikingly different yet beautiful personalities and, most importantly, share a deep love for one another. In the last several months, however, Saville, 20, and Lilia, 17, have embarked upon an unexpected and challenging journey–but they face it together. In 2016, Saville and Lilia were both diagnosed with brain cancer within three weeks of one another. As incomprehensible as it is, it also puzzles the medical community. Their tumors are different types, in different locations of their brains and appear to have no genetic link. These truly unbelievable circumstances triggered Saville and Lilia’s fighting spirits as they have faced challenges and triumphs side-by-side. Need an inspiration for courage? Look no further than Saville and Lilia Sullivan’s story of strength, hope and love. Lilia is a typical 17-year-old…almost. She is driven scholastically, athletically and socially. From leading her tennis team to the state championship to serving as quarterback during a high school powder puff football game, she thrives on competition. Equally as adventurous as she is competitive, Lilia returned in August of 2016 from a community service trip to South Africa followed by weeks working at Camp High Harbour. Her parents noticed she was tired, but who wouldn’t be with such an active summer? When she awakened them one night with nausea complaints, Lilia began to suffer from a full-blown seizure. It was then that her journey began with a diagnosis of a brain tumor identified as astrocytoma. Initially deemed inoperable, the talented team at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite knew the risk was one worth taking. In the last 10 months, Lilia has undergone a successful brain surgery, radiation treatments and currently takes oral chemotherapy. Would you believe this girl was on homecoming court, captain of the tennis team and headed back to Camp High Harbour this summer? She and her family coined the term, “You’ve got this.” And that she does. As Saville was visiting her sister at Scottish Rite, she mentioned having a lingering headache. If you know Saville, you know that even if she were in pain, others would still be the focus. Her loving personality is evident at the University of Alabama where, in September of 2016, she was stepping into her sophomore year, a member of Kappa Delta sorority and leading a vibrant social and academic life. Just weeks after Lilia’s surgery, a tumor in Saville’s cerebellum was discovered to be the root of her increasingly painful headache. The level of devastation that the family and all connected to the girls felt is impossible to put into words–but prayer and support for the family spread like wildfire. Like her sister with the competitive spirit, Saville has a deeply courageous spirit. Now nine months following her diagnosis, Saville was treated by the same medical team that treated Lilia and has undergone a successful surgery, proton therapy radiation and completed six months of chemotherapy at Scottish Rite’s Aflac Cancer Center in June. This August, Saville will return to Tuscaloosa to pick up where she left off…but with a new major. She will start studying to be Child Life Specialist, inspired by the those that impacted her and Lilia during some of the hardest days of their lives. The University of Alabama’s tagline is “Where Legends are Made.” Saville, you are a legend and an inspiration to everyone you meet. >>More from WSB Radio 2019 Care-a-Thon
  • Allison was diagnosed with ALL Leukemia the day before her 3rd birthday. Allison spent her 3rd birthday getting a port placed and her first round of chemo. The AFLAC clinic and inpatient teams have become like family considering we have spent 7 months inpatient. Allison will be 6 during the 2019 Care-A-Thon.  >>More from WSB Radio 2019 Care-a-Thon
  • The Southeast Region of the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation was established in August 2014 when the Atlanta-based Brain Tumor Foundation for Children united with the national PBTF to create a louder voice and greater impact for the children served by both organizations. The rich history of the Southeast Region, however, remains deeply embedded in the story of the Brain Tumor Foundation for Children. In 1980, Rick and Sheila Sauers’ 5-month-old daughter, Shaye, was diagnosed with a highly malignant brain tumor. Offered only a 2 percent chance of Shaye's long-term survival, the Sauers began a relentless campaign to seek knowledge and treatment to save their child. They found that very little information was available on brain tumors in children and that little research was being conducted. The overall message at that time was that most children died from this disease. Together with several other parents, Rick and Sheila began a local parent support group where families could exchange coping skills, comfort and information. In 1983, Rick and several other parents established the Brain Tumor Foundation for Children as the country’s first nonprofit organization focused on pediatric brain tumor disease. Over the years, in addition to raising funds for research, the BTFC became a direct patient and family services-oriented organization. And in 2000, the board of directors established the Butterfly Fund to provide emergency financial assistance for families at the time of a child’s treatment. The name Butterfly Fund was born from the BTFC’s butterfly logo, which represented the significant change during the child’s life and the metamorphosis experienced when a child is diagnosed with a brain tumor. Rick provided 23 years of service as a dedicated president and later chairman of the board of the BTFC. Many other devoted parents of affected children and business professionals served in board positions over the organization’s 31 years of existence. Today, the programs offered by BTFC continue as part of the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation’s Southeast Region. The largest of these programs is the Butterfly Fund, which provides emergency financial assistance to hundreds of families throughout the United States. The Southeast Region will forever be grateful to Rick Sauers and the many board members for their wisdom, guidance, hard work and perseverance in serving countless children and families affected by brain tumors. >>More from WSB Radio 2019 Care-a-Thon
  • Remi Hegwood is 2 years old and was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on 10/6/18. She went to the E.R. for discoloration, tiredness, and bruises and was then transported to CHOA Egleston where she got her diagnosis. She started chemo a few days later.  Her Mom and/or Mimi have been with her every day and every step of the way. Remi is still sassy and fighting every day. She won't give up! >>More from WSB Radio 2019 Care-a-Thon
  • Nene was born in March 2013. When his new birth blood screening results came back as 'Abnormal', we followed up to see a hematologist at the AFLAC Cancer and Blood Disorder clinic at Hughes Spalding. At 2 months old, he was diagnosed with Beta Thalassemia major, a blood disorder in which the body is unable to make normal adult hemoglobin. We started seeing symptoms of the disease when he was 6 months old, with his RBC starting to drop to low levels. At age 6 months, he received his first blood transfusion and continued getting blood in subsequent months at the AFLAC clinic at Scottish Rite with Dr. Maa-Ohui Quarmyne. He'll be taken to the hospital every 3 weeks for labs and will be transfused every 4-5 weeks.  At age 2, Nene started iron chelation treatment to reduce his high iron levels due to the monthly blood transfusions.  His treatment and diagnosis had a major impact on our family since one parent had to give up work to help him keep Nene in treatment.  We started asking for cure options for him. Dr. Quarmyne helped us connect to Be The Match. We then followed up with blood works and later received good news that they had found two perfect matches for him.  He was referred to the AFLAC BMT clinic at Egleston to continue his treatment for bone marrow transplant (BMT). He had his first BMT on September 22, 2015, at the Aflac BMT inpatient unit. Our 6 weeks stay there was especially made comfortable and easier due to the staff and volunteers who'll come by to spend time playing with him and bring him toys and souvenirs. Sometimes, it didn't feel like he was being treated at all due to all the activities he was able to be engaged in. We stayed at the Ronald McDonald's house (RMH) at Egleston for Christmas in 2015, until he was fully discharged to go home. Our stay there was awesome. A year later, Nene started losing the donor cells and received a second BMT on January 20, 2017.  We had similar great experience at hospital, both inpatient and outpatient. The staff was great, and he was always excited to see his doctors and nurses. The second transplant had been successful. He was discharged from the AFLAC BMT Clinic at Egleston and was sent back to Dr. Quarmyne at the AFLAC clinic at Scottish Rite to continue his care. The doctors and care team, including social workers, have been there to provide us with answers to all our questions. Doctors have been available on call for my family during late night emergencies. Our overall experience with AFLAC has been awesome. Having a child who needs regular medical care can be stressful but the entire clinic staff help make things a whole lot easier. They're always very nice and welcoming to us. They provide us with resources to make things easier for our family. Most importantly, Nene always leaves the clinic with a broad smile in his face. Thank you for all you do! You are the real heroes. >> More from WSB 2019 Care-a-Thon
  • My name is Luke England and I am a 16-year-old sophomore at East Hall High School. I am your typical high school kid. I enjoy playing baseball and football and spending time with my friends. However, I am anything but typical. Last year, I fought and beat cancer.  My cancer story starts in early November 2017. I had just come back from a hunting trip when I had developed a fever. I had been to my pediatrician where they ran tests to understand what exactly was going on. After missing a lot of school due to constant pain and fevers and a few negative tests, I had now hit day 17 of my fever. 17 days of a fever -- this is when we knew something wasn’t quite right.  During the week of Thanksgiving that year, the doctors did tests only to find that there were masses all over the organs in my body. After biopsy-ing the masses, my team of doctors believe these masses were part of an infectious disease. The infectious disease teams continued to run tests to understand how to best relieve my pain and constant fevers.  Then… January rolled around. During the month of January, things started to progress. The pain increased significantly. I continued to play baseball, because I was a 15-year-old kid, and my life revolved around sports. While at baseball practice, the best option for me was to hit because I had some much adrenaline from making contact with the ball that it appeased the pain for a while. Then, one night at practice, I was hitting when I missed the ball and all the pain hit me at once. This is when I knew I just had to throw in the towel because the pain was too much. Walking off a baseball practice was pretty extreme from me, so this is when my friends, coaches, and parents knew they had to find answers.  Throughout the month of January, I also started taking baths to appease the pain. My house has two hot water heaters in the bathrooms, so I would fill one bathtub with hot water and sit in it until it got cold then I would move to the next bathtub. Because spending all my spare time jumping from bathtub to bathtub was the only way to fight this pain. I also had a very difficult time sleeping. Regardless of which way I slept, it was hurting my shoulder or my elbow, so I spent about 2 weeks without sleep. Just standing and walking around my room in the middle of the night because the pain was not worth the sleep.  In the beginning of February, I lost about 30% movement in my elbow and a mass popped up the size of a fist of my left shoulder blade. On Feb. 14 I hit a breaking point of no longer being able to handle the pain.  The next day my mom took me back to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta determined to stay until we found some answers. After more tests, the masses were now showing cancer cells. We spent the weekend at the Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center waiting to understand what type of cancer it was. We were told that there was a slim chance that the cancer could be lymphoma since it was ruled out back in November. My clinical team believed that the tests would more than likely come back to show a solid tumor mass – possibly a cancer like Ewing Sarcoma – which is rare and aggressive. Essentially, that weekend my parents were told to get ready to expect the worst. I, on the other hand, spent that weekend with the 200 visitors that had come to see me. Yes, that very first weekend, I had over 200 people who had driven the hour drive to come see me in the hospital. That Tuesday, we received the news that the cancer that presented itself on my body was indeed non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which seemed like a far more promising diagnosis than a rarer solid tumor. In fact, my parents had spent the weekend praying that it was a type of lymphoma.  I was then prescribed 6 months of chemotherapy where I was in the hospital for about 5 days every 21 days. While being at the hospital was not ideal, I developed relationships with the clinical team that truly started to feel like family. Some of my nurses would come in on their days off if they were going out of town to come see me before the left. Me and some of the nurses would have coffee dates regularly and a lot of them would come in to share the Mountain Dew and Sour Patch Kids that my many visitors were constantly bringing. Treatment almost instantly made an impact. The fist-size mass on my shoulder went away almost immediately. I was also very lucky that chemo never made me sick or nauseas and I never experienced any setbacks, like spiking a fever. In fact, 31 days after my first round of chemo, I played in my first high school baseball game and attended prom. I can confidently say that after starting treatment, things were officially looking up.  The six months of chemo led to me ringing the end of treatment bell in July. The ringing of the bell was a milestone in my cancer story as that is when I was officially deemed done with treatment and no signs of cancer left in my body.  I have continued my life as a typical high schooler. I am now in my sophomore year and have a pretty busy schedule with football, baseball, and spending time with friends and family. The biggest impact that my journey with cancer has left on me is maturity. I understand how valuable life really is. There can be a lot of drama in high school which can be hard for me since I understand there is so much more to life. All this to say, I am doing great now. I have my driver’s license and endless opportunities in front of me.  >>More from WSB Radio 2019 Care-a-Thon
  • Malachi Russell, a seventh grader at Sherwood Christian Academy in Albany, is currently in treatment at the Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta for a rare, aggressive cancer.  RELATED: Young soccer player battling cancer honored as team retires his jersey On March 21, the Sherwood Eagles honored Malachi by retiring his soccer jersey, number '00,' in an emotional ceremony at the stadium. Teams often retire player's jerseys as an honor for accomplishments on the field. Malachi, an avid soccer player, is unfortunately not able to play right now, but he got to kick off the game in his favorite position -- as starting goalkeeper.  As Malachi took his position at midfield in his wheelchair, a member of the opposing team swiftly kicked the ball toward him and Malachi caught it, bringing cheers from the crowd.  Eagles head coach Jeremy Davidson delivered an emotional message to Malachi as he was honored at halftime, the Albany Herald reported.  'You have been extraordinary and forever changed all of us who are a part of Sherwood FC,' Davidson said. 'You have never been focused on yourself, but instead on those around you. You have shown us was family really looks like. You will be the only person to ever wear the “00” jersey. Thank you for what you have taught us.” Malachi also got a jersey with all of the varsity players' signatures.  His 00 jersey will be hung in the field house at Sherwood Christian Academy. >>More from WSB Radio 2019 Care-a-Thon