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    The 92nd Oscars is getting some fresh faces behind the production. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences says Friday that Lynette Howell Taylor and Stephanie Allain will produce the February show. While newcomers to the Academy Awards, both are veteran producers in the industry. Howell Taylor is an Oscar-nominated producer of “A Star Is Born.” Allain, who runs the company Homegrown Pictures, has been behind films like “Hustle & Flow” and “Dear White People.” Film academy president David Rubin says they’ll bring dynamism and excitement to the show, but it remains unclear whether there will be a host. Last year’s host-less Oscars saw an uptick in viewership after a record-low year. The 2020 Oscars will be broadcast live on ABC on Feb. 9.
  • Former Ukrainian Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch’s impeachment testimony on Friday spotlighted the role of conservative media in her downfall and the chilling reminder that she remains a social media target. The ousted ambassador recalled a series of articles by reporter John Solomon, writing for The Hill newspaper in March, that launched a campaign to discredit her when they were disseminated through tweets by President Donald Trump, his son Donald Jr., and Fox News Channel. Solomon, a former reporter for The Associated Press and Washington Post, now reports for his own website. In March, Solomon reported that Ukraine’s then prosecutor general, Yuriy Lutsenko, said Yovanovitch had given him a list of people who should not be prosecuted for crimes, and that she was bad-mouthing President Trump behind the scenes. In testimony on Friday, Yovanovitch denied those claims and talked about the impact it had on her that the stories were being spread. “I was worried that these attacks were being repeated by the president himself and his son,” she said. She said that colleagues in the State Department thought they were ridiculous, but that she could not get the strong statement of support that she wanted. Solomon said Friday that “I stand by each and every one of the columns that I wrote” and that they were carefully vetted by lawyers and editors at The Hill. He said multiple witnesses confirmed his reporting that the U.S. embassy applied pressure not to prosecute certain individuals. Solomon said his reporting on Ukraine was spurred by questions he had about former Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter and his involvement in a Ukrainian company. One of Solomon’s earliest articles on the topic, published by The Hill in March, alleged evidence of a “Ukrainian plot to help Clinton.” It has since been shared, reacted to or commented on by Facebook users nearly 100,000 times, according to data from Facebook-owned CrowdTangle. While Fox News Channel host Sean Hannity’s role received tangential attention on Friday, he has said that he only mentioned Yovanovitch “a few times in passing” on his top-rated show, a pillar in conservative media. Hannity has also denied earlier testimony from diplomat George Kent that the State Department applied pressure on Hannity to back off covering Solomon’s allegations. The most riveting part of Yovanovitch’s appearance Friday came when Adam Schiff, chairman of the committee conducting the hearing, asked the former ambassador to react to a tweet that President Trump had sent about her while she was testifying. Trump wrote that “everywhere Marie Yovanovitch went turned bad.” “I can’t speak to what the president is trying to do, but the effect is to be intimidating,” she said. Minutes after Trump’s tweet, his followers took up arms. “I hired Donald Trump to fire people like Yovanovitch,” read a message from the Twitter account under the name Cari Kelemen, which frequently posts pro-Trump content. Kelemen’s tweet appeared to be the first boasting the slogan and was shared 6,000 times by the close of the hearing. An email sent to Kelemen was not immediately returned. Donald Trump Jr. echoed the tweet by writing that America hired his father “to fire people like the first three witnesses we’ve seen. Career government bureaucrats and nothing more.” Despite the online effort to downplay Yovanovitch’s testimony on Friday, Fox News Channel newsmen Bret Baier and Chris Wallace testified to its power. Baier said the hearing “turned on a dime” when Trump tweeted about her, enabling Schiff to characterize it as intimidating a witness. “If you are not moved ... by the testimony of Marie Yovanovitch today, you don’t have a pulse,” Wallace said. He said that Republicans didn’t present any evidence to counter her contentions that stories spread in conservative media to smear her. “Republicans have not been able to make the case at all that she was a bad actor,” he said. ____ Associated Press writer Amanda Seitz in Chicago and researchers Monika Mathur in Washington and Jennifer Farrar in New York contributed to this report.
  • Millions of Americans are choosing to experience the impeachment hearings through media filters that depict the proceedings as either a worthless sham or like Christmas in November. That’s the chief difference between now and the two other times in the modern era when a presidential impeachment was explored, and will likely be a major factor in determining whether the hearings change anyone’s minds about President Donald Trump. Fox News Channel was the favorite network of the 13.8 million Americans who watched Wednesday’s opening of the House hearing on television. The audiences for each of Fox’s prime-time opinion hosts — Tucker Carlson, Sean Hannity and Laura Ingraham — were larger that evening than the 2.9 million people who watched the network during the day, the Nielsen company said. On MSNBC, a favorite of liberals in the same way many conservatives love Fox, Rachel Maddow’s audience beat the network’s live hearing coverage. “Today you can pick the information source that is going to talk to you and what you’d like to believe and that’s the way the audience has been dividing themselves,” said Thomas Patterson, who teaches about government and the press at Harvard University and is the author of “How America Lost its Mind,” about the nation’s polarization. By contrast, the chief option for working Americans who wanted to follow the impeachment case against President Richard Nixon in the 1970s was a rerun of the day’s hearing that aired in prime time on PBS. This year, PBS is streaming a rerun of the Trump hearing. A rerun has also been available on the HLN network. CNN, Fox News Channel and MSNBC did not exist in the 1970s, and while CNN was in its adolescence, the other networks were in their infancy during President Bill Clinton’s impeachment in the late 1990s. The same is true of an online partisan infrastructure. Today they are the dominant cable networks and each offered lively takes from their perspectives on Wednesday. On Fox, it was labeled a snooze, even though viewers were interested: Fox had its third-highest audience of the year. Hannity described the hearing as “a lousy day for the corrupt, do-nothing-for-three-years extreme socialist Democrats and their top allies, known as the media mob.” “This has all the box office mojo of ‘Grease 2,’” Ingraham said. The whole premise of the impeachment case is “just too dumb not to hurt” Democrats, Carlson said. When going over specifics from the hearing, the hosts emphasized exchanges featuring Republican members of the committee, such as the brief pause after Rep. John Ratcliffe of Texas asked diplomats William Taylor and George Kent about whether they had seen impeachable behavior from Trump. “Crickets!” Hannity said. Before the clip was cut off, however, Taylor was seen soundlessly starting to deliver an answer into his microphone. Taylor testified that it was up to lawmakers to decide what behavior is impeachable. Different clips, depending on how they looked politically, were popular on different corners of the Internet and during the prime-time opinion lineup at MSNBC. One moment that received multiple plays came when Democratic Rep. Peter Welch of Vermont suggested, to some laughter, that Trump testify before Congress. Host Chris Hayes said the hearing was historic, and gave citizens a fuller picture of Trump’s alleged abuse of power. An hour later, Maddow was also excited to run through highlights. “I learned new facts and I heard interesting new arguments and perspectives I had never heard before that I felt deepened my perspective on something I was already obsessed with,” she said. The two outlooks reminded Harvard’s Patterson of the 1992 book, “Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus.” “Republicans and Democrats have such different views of reality, they might as well be on different planets,” he said. Viewers seem to be getting used to it . A poll released this week from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that about 6 in 10 Americans say they regularly see conflicting reports about the same set of facts from different sources. Nearly half of Americans say that it’s difficult to know if they information they see is true. The hunger for straightforward summaries hasn’t disappeared. Evening newscasts on ABC, CBS and NBC routinely reach more than 20 million viewers a night cumulatively, and all gave newsy accounts of the day’s hearings. Measurements aren’t available yet of how many people watched Wednesday’s hearing online through a side computer screen at work, and what feeds they used. Yet the appeal of seeing news through specific filters was evident in a way that would have seemed unthinkable just 20 years ago. The two networks seen as appealing to specific points of view, Fox News and MSNBC, were more popular Wednesday than the traditional network news divisions of ABC, CBS and NBC, Nielsen said.
  • Officials in Wyoming have received a building permit application from Kanye West for a proposed amphitheater on property owned by the rapper. West recently announced that he plans to move the headquarters of his shoe and clothing company, Adidas Yeezy, to Cody. He also wants to build a 70,000-square-foot (6,500-square-meter) amphitheater on his 4,000-acre (1,600-hectare) ranch. The Cody Enterprise reports the Park County Planning and Zoning Commission plans to discuss the proposed “West Meditation Space Large Impact Structure” on Tuesday. West has worked on or recorded his past three albums in Wyoming, including the recently released “Jesus Is King.” The planning commission will recommend whether county commissioners should approve the project. Cody, a town with 10,000 people, was named for wild West showman William Frederick “Buffalo Bill” Cody.
  • Mina Lioness’ longstanding battle to finally receive writing credit on Lizzo’s megahit song “Truth Hurts” is paying off in more ways than one: it could win her a potential Grammy Award. Lizzo's breakthrough tune features the signature line — 'I just took a DNA test, turns out I'm 100% that bitch” — a lyric that originated from a 2017 tweet by Lioness and was turned into a popular meme. And now Lioness, a singer based in London who Lizzo agreed to give writing credit to, has a chance at earning her first Grammy nomination if “Truth Hurts” scores a nomination for song of the year — a category reserved for the writers of a song. “I haven't really been able to kind of just sit and ponder what the ramifications is of this happening. I mean, it's just surreal to me,” Lioness said in a phone interview from London with The Associated Press this week. “I didn't actually realize that the Grammy nominations were being announced next week, but I knew that this would be a possibility for me when it’s all said and done. But for it to come through so soon as well, it's just another one of those moments when you’re like, ‘Wow.’” The Recording Academy will announce its nominees on Nov. 20. When Grammy submissions were due earlier this year, Lioness had not been a listed writer of “Truth Hurts,” but Atlantic Records, Lizzo’s label home, told the AP they are in the process of submitting Lioness’ name as a co-writer of “Truth Hurts” to the Grammys. “Truth Hurts,” which topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart for seven weeks, is a likely contender in categories like song of the year, in which Lioness would share the nomination with co-writers Lizzo, Ricky Reed, Tele and Jesse Saint John. The song could also land a nomination for record of the year, a category that awards the song’s performers, producers and engineers/mixers, or best pop solo performance, an award that would only be given to Lizzo. Lioness said next week will be one of the biggest in her life — not only does she find out if she’ll become a Grammy nominee, she will “find out the results of my master's degree, pretty much on the same day (as the Grammy nominations).” “I still got work tomorrow,” added Lioness, who studied social policy at the London School of Economics. “I’m still a regular person.” Lioness created the tweet that’s changed her life “from zero to 100” — as she put it — around 4 o’clock in the morning in 2017. She said she was responding to a tweet from singer-actress Demi Lovato, who had posted about her ancestry background results. “She was saying all these different places she’s from and in one tweet she was like, ‘And I’m 1% African.’ And I was just so besides myself. I was just laughing so hard,” Lioness said. So she replied with: “I just did a DNA test and found out I’m 100% that bitch.” She went to bed. Woke up. And she had gone viral. Her bold sentence has become so popular that even Hillary Clinton tweeted some of the line, sans the vulgar word in August around the time “Truth Hurts” became a worldwide hit. The song was originally released in 2017 but got a boost this year after it was featured in the Netflix film 'Someone Great,' and as Lizzo’s label saw the public’s interest in the song, they decided to push it. Lioness learned her words were featured in “Truth Hurts” when she and some friends were Googling some of their most popular tweets. “I was just like, ‘What?’ From then on I started to try to get in contact with Lizzo,” she said. Eventually things blew up for Lizzo last month when the songwriting brothers Justin and Jeremiah Raisen said they felt they deserved writing credit on 'Truth Hurts.” A week later, Lizzo announced she was giving credit to Lioness and later filed a lawsuit to establish that the Raisens, as well as Justin 'Yves' Rothman, are not entitled to any credit for the song. Lioness said, at first, she wasn’t sure what to do when she discovered her words were in a pop song. “I had a lot of resentment at first, I will be completely honest. It did hurt me in the beginning to know that no one actually believed that you’re the one who brought this to the internet,” she said. “It’s so easy to erase credit online, but I just wasn’t going down without a fight.” She said watching Peaches Monroee — the young girl who went viral after praising her eyebrows for being “on fleek” — not be properly credited for starting the trendy word inspired her to fight hard for her own credit. “I saw that she was pleading and it hurt to watch another black girl have to beg for something that she put on the internet just out of a sheer joke. People told me to do the same, people told me to do a GoFundMe, but I just didn't want to do any of that because I'm not begging for something that belongs to me. Absolutely not,” she said. Things worked out for Lioness, and she and Lizzo are on good terms. They met in person this month after Lizzo’s concert in London. “She’s just really kind. She spoke to my heart. She looked me in my eyes and we had a really heartfelt conversation and we hugged,” Lioness said. And now Lioness is using her newfound fame to help boost her own music career. She said she’s been singing since she was 3 and counts Jill Scott, Mary J. Blige and Erykah Badu as inspirations. She and her musical partner, Jam, have released music together, and they are busy working on more songs as well as writing for others. “It's still tough because I would like to be known for what I said, but I don't want to be defined by one moment,” said Lioness. “I’m a very multidimensional artist. And so I don't want to be known for just one thing, and I don't want this to be the peak of my career.”
  • Exceptionally high tidal waters rolled relentlessly through Venice again on Friday, forcing the closure of St. Mark’s Square to the public and flooding most of the lagoon city’s already devastated center before easing. Forecasters warned that the danger for more wind-propelled high tides remained through the weekend. The Italian government issued an international appeal for donations to help repair damage to the centuries-old city’s rich cultural heritage after Tuesday’s floods, which were the worst in decades. People can donate 2 euros ($2.20) by sending a text message to a special number Culture Minister Dario Franceschini said. “All the world loves this splendid city, let them show it now,’’ he said in a statement. A senior port authority official wrote to major cruise ship companies to for donations. Massive cruise liners disgorge thousands of day-trippers into Venice on a near-daily basis, boosting its economy but also risking accidents with smaller vessels. Late Tuesday, Venice water levels reached 1.87 meters (6 feet, 1 inch) above sea level, the highest flooding since 1966. On Friday, ten minutes before noon, the tide peaked at 1.54 meters (5 feet) above sea level. Six hours later, it had receded to some 60 centimeters (two feet). Built on a series of tiny islets amid a system of canals, Venice is particularly vulnerable to a combination of rising sea levels due to climate change coupled with the city’s well-documented sinking into the mud. The sea level in Venice is 10 centimeters (4 inches) higher than it was 50 years ago, according to the city’s tide office. More than 50 churches have reported damage from the tides, Minister Franceschini said as he inspected the city. Carabinieri officers from the corps’ world-renowned and highly-trained squad of art experts were being deployed to map damage to art treasures, a job that is expected to take some time. “While the water is still there, it’s difficult to know what the (full) damage is,” Franceschini said. The minister called on lawmakers of all political stripes to quickly approve extending tax breaks for those who donate to help restore state monuments and artworks and also for those who contribute for Venice’s damaged churches. “There are so many churches which have suffered damage and were invaded by water,’’ Franceschini. Likely the most heavily damaged was St. Mark’s Basilica, since it is in one of the lowest points of the city. At the government’s request, the Italian Space Agency was gathering radar data from satellites to detect any signs that Venice bell towers may have shifted or that their foundations might have weakened after being buffeted countless times over the centuries by fast-rising waters. On Thursday, the government declared a state of emergency, approving 20 million euros ($22.1 million) to help Venice repair the most urgent damage. Venice Mayor Luigi Brugnaro has estimated damage at hundreds of millions of euros and blamed climate change for the city’s plight. He also called for the speedy completion of the city’s long-delayed Moses flood defense project. Moses consists of a series of moveable barriers in the lagoon that can be raised when high winds and high tides combine to threaten to send “acqua alta,’’ as the uniquely Venetian phenomenon is known, rushing across the city. Completion of the multibillion-euro project, under construction since 2003, has been delayed by corruption scandals, cost overruns and opposition from environmentalists who were worried about its effects on Venice’s delicate lagoon ecosystem. Opposition politicians in the Veneto Region, which has Venice as its capital, noted wryly that the local center-right majority had just voted against an amendment to fund efforts aimed at dealing with climate change when the regional assembly hall was flooded Tuesday night, forcing politicians to flee. While tourists sloshed earlier in the week in St. Mark’s Square or strolled across it on strategically placed raised walkways to witness the water rushing into ancient St. Mark’s Basilica, on Friday, the mayor said he asked police to block off the square, which covered in water up to adults’ knees. University students in Venice rushed to libraries and other institutions filled with books and manuscripts to help shift the material to higher stories. Improvising, at least one volunteer used a hair dryer to dry a valued volume, page by page. The Italian Society of Authors and Editors, which said Venice’s book stores and libraries were “gravely damaged” by the high water, launched a fundraising campaign. Pitching for donations from Italy and abroad, the group said it was important to “take the side of those who every day are on the front lines for the defense of Italian culture.” It said one Venice bookstore, poignantly named “Acqua Alta” (High Water), had been completely submerged by the rushing water. Venice’s La Fenice opera theater was left unusable by the flooding. Milan’s opera theater, La Scala, said it would mount a special ballet on Nov. 29 to raise funds for La Fenice. __ Giada Zampano and Frances D’Emilio contributed from Rome. ___ Follow AP's full coverage of climate issues at https://www.apnews.com/Climate
  • The paperback edition of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s “The Long Game” includes a foreword from a well-placed political ally: President Donald Trump. In the foreword, shared Friday by the publisher Sentinel with The Associated Press, Trump praises the Kentucky Republican as an ideal partner in confirming conservative judges, notably Supreme Court Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh. More than 150 federal judges have been nominated by Trump and confirmed by the Senate. About one-quarter of federal appeals court judges were nominated by Trump. “The effort to transform the courts is one that will benefit the American people far into the future. It is a legacy of which I am immensely proud and one for which Mitch McConnell deserves great credit,” Trump writes. “Transforming the federal judiciary is the ultimate long game!” The paperback comes out December 3, more than three years after the hardcover. The gap is unusually long but the new edition is well-timed for McConnell’s re-election campaign next year. “The Long Game” was first published in May 2016, soon after the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. McConnell famously refused to let then-President Barack Obama fill the seat, now held by Gorsuch, whom Trump nominated in 2017. In an afterword for the paperback, McConnell writes of his long friendship with Scalia, defends his decision to keep the seat open and describes close coordination between himself and Trump for the Gorsuch and Kavanaugh nominations. Trump nominated Kavanaugh in the summer of 2018 and McConnell confirms reports from the time that he was concerned Kavanaugh’s many years in government, including more than a decade as a federal judge, would result in a “paper trail” that could extend the process past the midterm elections. He then recounts the testimony of Christine Blasey Ford, who had alleged that Kavanaugh attempted to sexually assault her while both were in high school. “Immediately after Dr. Ford had completed her testimony that morning, the phone rang. It was a familiar voice: the president,” McConnell writes. “He and I both agreed that Dr. Ford had been a compelling witness. I expressed to the president that it was only ‘halftime,’ however, and that he should wait until completion of the second half before making any decisions. Again, the president needed no persuading. I then watched Kavanaugh’s afternoon appearance before the committee. Immediately after the hearing had concluded, the phone rang again. Once more, it was the president. We both thought that Kavanaugh had done well.” Kavanaugh was confirmed 50-48. McConnell recalls a lunch soon before the vote with a key Republican Senator, Susan Collins of Maine, who, like McConnell, is up for re-election in 2020. “During our meal, she seemed relaxed and fully at ease. As we ate, I did not ask her for her vote, and she did not volunteer it. But, given her demeanor, I intuited that she was going to vote for Kavanaugh,” he writes. “This was not an easy position for her: she hails from a liberal state, and she and her staff were subjected to numerous intimidation tactics by the left. Coming on the heels of her speech, Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed the next day.”
  • Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday, who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1969 for his groundbreaking novel “House Made of Dawn,” said he’s not done writing and vows to finish his long-anticipated memoir. In a rare interview at his Santa Fe home, the 85-year-old author told The Associated Press he’s excited about a new PBS documentary about his work, and it’s allowing him to reflect on his life growing up in Oklahoma and New Mexico. The former University of California-Berkeley professor also has two other books in the works. “I’m staying active, and I still have a lot to accomplish,” Momaday said during a break from writing. “The memoir has been shelved for now, but I will get to it.” Momaday said the memoir will delve into his childhood with his teacher parents and explain why he sees himself as a reincarnation of a bear. He also plans to write about the surprise he felt becoming the first Native American writer to win the Pulitzer, and about studying American poet Emily Dickinson’s manuscripts, getting followed by Soviet Union agents while teaching in Moscow, and meeting artist Georgia O'Keeffe late in her life. “That story appeared in Reader’s Digest,” Momaday said. As he tells it, O'Keeffe disappeared for a long time during one of their meetings, and dismantled a locked door to a pantry that held the alcohol. “Her maid had took the key,” he said. The American Masters documentary series is set to air “N. Scott Momaday: Words from a Bear” on most PBS stations Monday. Director Jeffrey Palmer dove into Momaday’s career but also talked to Muscogee Nation member and poet Joy Harjo about Momaday’s impact on American Literature. Palmer also interviewed actors including Jeff Bridges and James Earl Jones, who said Momaday’s work touched them. “I thought his voice was one of a storyteller. But because he had this poet ring to it, it took on a whole different tone,” actor Robert Redford said in the film. “I think that’s why I got hooked on Scott.” Momaday’s “House Made of Dawn” has been credited with starting the modern Native American literary movement and influencing the likes of Chickasaw novelist Linda Hogan, Spokane and Coeur d’Alene writer Sherman Alexie and Laguna Pueblo novelist Leslie Marmon Silko. “House Made of Dawn” follows Abel, a Jemez Pueblo man who is struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder after returning from his service in World War II. Abel seeks to find himself, first on his reservation and later in the city. Momaday said the novel is based on his knowledge of growing up on Jemez Pueblo in New Mexico, where his parents taught school. After more than a half-century, Momaday said he is humbled by the fact that writers continue to say his work has influenced them. “I’m greatly appreciative of that, but it comes a little bit of a surprise every time I hear it,” Momaday said. “I think I have been an influence. It’s not something I take a lot of credit for.” As a tribute to Momaday’s influence, the American Masters produced a special podcast with Harjo, the first Native American U.S. poet laureate, who talked about how Momaday inspired her. “Momaday was the one we all looked up to,” Harjo said. “His works were transcendent. There was always a point where despite the challenges and losses ... there was some moment that imparted beauty.”
  • Pierce Brosnan’s sons have been chosen as the Golden Globe ambassadors to assist with the glitzy awards ceremony. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association announced Thursday evening that 22-year-old Dylan and 18-year-old Paris Brosnan will assume the ambassador roles for the 77th annual Golden Globes Awards in January. An ambassador is traditionally the child of a celebrity who assists with award presentations, handing out trophies to winners and escorting them off stage. The Brosnan brothers said they are more excited than nervous to appear on stage at the awards. “We watched the Globes growing up ... and I’ve gone with him a few times. So it’s truly an honor to be here in this capacity and pay homage to our father’s legacy,” said Dylan Brosnan about his father, a two-time Golden Globe nominee. Dylan and Paris are the first male ambassadors after the HFPA rechristened the role, formerly known as Miss Golden Globe, in 2017. The association wanted to expand the role to help recognize the HFPA's philanthropic efforts throughout the year. The brothers will be partnering with the organization named FEED to deliver nutritious meals to school-aged children throughout the world. “Our effort is to end child hunger and for parents to help keep their kids in school,” Paris Brosnan said. Previous ambassadors include Idris Elba’s daughter Isan Elba and Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson's daughter, Simone Garcia. The Golden Globes ceremony will be held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, on Jan. 5. Nominations for the show, which honors achievements in film and television, will be announced on Dec. 9.
  • The Latest on the Latin Grammys, which are being presented Thursday at the MGM Grand Garden Arena. (all times local): 8:10 p.m. Rosalía has won album of the year at the Latin Grammys for her breakout album “El Mal Querer.” Thursday’s ceremony was a big night for the Spanish singer, who also took home the honors for best pop contemporary album and best urban song for “Con Altura,” her collaboration with J Balvin. Rosalia put her hand on her forehead when host Ricky Martin called her name for the evening’s top honor. She initially seemed overwhelmed with emotion during her acceptance speech, but went on to thank those who supported her music and calling her win incredible. The ceremony honored 20 years of Latin Grammys history, kicking off with a massive performance honoring multiple genres of Latin music. Highlights included Colombian singer Juanes performing a set of his hits and then being honored by one of his idols, Lars Ulrich of Metallica. ___ 5:25 p.m. The Latin Grammys have opened with a vibrant tribute to Latin music led by a performance of the late Celia Cruz’s “La Vida Es Un Carnaval” as part of the show’s 20th anniversary celebration. The opening number featured a panoply of artists including Prince Royce, Anitta, Natalia Jimenez, Olga Tañon and Fito Paez performing songs from icons like Cruz, Juan Gabriel, Joan Sebastian and the rock band Soda Stereo. Host Ricky Martin cited Cruz’s importance to the show in his opening remarks, playing a clip of him performing with Cruz and Gloria Estefan at the 2000 show. Martin is hosting the show along with Roselyn Sánchez and Paz Vega. Early winners on the telecast, which is being aired by Univision, included Juan Luis Guerra for best contemporary/tropical fusion album for “Literal” and Bad Bunny for best urban album. ___ 7 a.m. The Latin Grammys will celebrate its 20th anniversary with a 20-artist performance in a tribute to the legacy of Latin music. Thursday night’s show, airing live on Univision from Las Vegas, will open with a performance featuring Prince Royce, Anitta, Fito Páez, Natalia Jiménez and more highlighting four genres in Latin music. Ricky Martin, Roselyn Sánchez and Paz Vega will host the show, which will also include performances by Residente, Bad Bunny, Luis Fonsi, Farruko, Ozuna, Alicia Keys, Miguel and Juanes. Alejandro Sanz and Rosalía, the leading nominees, will also perform. None of the uber-popular Latin trap and reggaeton acts, including J Balvin, Bad Bunny, Ozuna and Daddy Yankee, received nominations in the show’s top four categories, and the Latin Grammys received backlash as a result.