Coronavirus:

What You Need To Know

On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

clear-day
67°
Clear
H 84° L 66°
  • clear-day
    67°
    Current Conditions
    Clear. H 84° L 66°
  • cloudy-day
    82°
    Afternoon
    Partly Cloudy. H 84° L 66°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    80°
    Evening
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 84° L 66°
Listen
Pause
Error

News on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

Traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

Weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Entertainment

    Country music singer Morgan Wallen apologized Sunday following his weekend arrest on public intoxication and disorderly conduct charges. Wallen, 27, was arrested Saturday night after he was kicked out of Kid Rock's bar in downtown Nashville, news outlets reported. Wallen said on Twitter that he and some friends were “horse-playing” after a few bar stops. “We didn’t mean any harm, and we want to say sorry to any bar staff or anyone that was affected,” Wallen tweeted. “Thank you to the local authorities for being so professional and doing their job with class. Love y’all.” Wallen's hits include 'Whiskey Glasses' and “Chasin' You.” He competed on “The Voice” in 2014 and co-wrote songs for Jason Aldean and Kane Brown.
  • Hana Kimura, a Japanese pro-wrestler who appeared in the latest series of the popular reality show “Terrace House,” has died. She was 22. Her organization Stardom Wrestling confirmed Kimura's death on Saturday. It said details are still largely unknown and the group was cooperating in an investigation, and asked her fans to be respectful. “We are very sorry to report that our Hana Kimura has passed away,” the organization said in a statement. Kimura was found dead at her home, Japanese media said. Kimura became the target of massive bullying on social media over her role on the “Terrace House” show on Netflix, which involves three men and three women temporarily living together at a shared house in Tokyo. The show was temporarily suspended due to the coronavirus. In her latest Instagram posting Friday, she published a photo of herself and her cat, with a message saying “Goodbye.” Another posting carried a message “I love you, live long and happy. I'm sorry.' Her death has triggered a wave of messages on social media against anonymous bullying and hateful messages. Kimura, whose mother Kyoko was also a famous pro-wrestler, performed at a sold-out Madison Square Garden event by Japan Pro-Wrestling and U.S. Ring of Honor.
  • Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar's metamorphosis from refugee to the first Somali-American in Congress has been well-documented. Now, Omar is out with a new memoir that offers her own spin on her path to prominence, starting with her childhood in Mogadishu. “This is What America Looks Like: My Journey from Refugee to Congresswoman,” set for release Tuesday, offers no revelations on some of the controversies that have dogged Omar. Instead, it sketches rugged years that Omar says made her a fearless fighter, unafraid to skirmish with President Donald Trump and her frequent conservative critics. A YOUNG FIGHTER In her memoir, written with Rebecca Paley, Omar recounts taking on a much taller boy when she was just 7, rubbing his face in the sand after he picked on someone weaker. “I wasn’t afraid of fighting. I felt like I was bigger and stronger than everyone else — even if I knew that wasn’t really the case,” she wrote. It's a theme woven throughout the book, including after she arrived in America and settled in Arlington, Virginia, knowing almost no English. Omar got into fights in middle school to show she wasn't afraid, she writes, and she describes incidents in which she choked one boy until he foamed at the mouth and kept hitting another girl even after being told the girl was pregnant. “Fighting didn’t feel like a choice. It was a part of me. Respect goes both ways,” she wrote. LIFE IN SOMALIA Omar said she grew up the youngest of seven in a loud, opinionated middle-class family, living in a guarded compound in Mogadishu. Her father’s clan was one of the country’s most powerful, and her mother, who died when she was in preschool, was Benadiri, a Somali ethnic minority. Omar, who described herself as a tomboy, said the only place she fit in was within the walls of her family home. Civil war broke out when she was 8, and after her family's compound came under attack by militia, the family escaped and eventually made it to a refugee camp in Kenya, where Omar spent four years before the family moved to the U.S. LOVE AND STRUGGLES Omar recounts meeting her first husband, Ahmed Hirsi, in Minneapolis when she was 16. She said they were in love, and shortly before she turned 19, their families decided they should marry. By 2008, Omar was struggling. Finances were a stressor, she had two small children, and she began questioning her relationships, including her marriage. Since the couple had married religiously – not civilly -- to get divorced, Hirsi had to simply declare the marriage ended, Omar wrote. She then had what she called “a Britney Spears-style meltdown” in which she shaved her head and eloped with a man, Ahmed Nur Said Elmi, whom she wrote she “spent so little time with that I wouldn’t even make him a footnote in my story if it weren’t for the fact that this event turned into the main headline later on.” In the book, Omar doesn’t name Elmi or say how they met or when their relationship ended. She later reunited with Hirsi and had a third child. Her book also doesn’t mention her recent divorce from Hirsi and new marriage to a man who works as a consultant for her. “SPECULATION AND CONSPIRACIES” Since Omar ran for state lawmaker in 2016, she has been met with allegations that Elmi, the man she married during her split from Hirsi, is her brother. Omar again denies those claims, saying they originated from a post in an online Somali discussion forum that she said was a last-ditch effort to sink her campaign. “That Somalis were some of my harshest critics might seem absurd. But they refused to accept me because I refused to kiss the ring. It goes back to my inability since childhood to submit to bullies,” she wrote. PUBLIC LIFE Omar was elected to the state Legislature in 2016, knocking off a 44-year incumbent. She describes a statehouse “hostile to my presence” because of her determination to attack the status quo, and recounts confronting a fellow Democratic lawmaker unhappy she'd won a leadership position. The lawmaker told Omar she was different, and eventually said it was because she walks into a room “like a man.” “A white man,” Omar said she responded. As a congresswoman, Omar has come under fire for controversial statements, and has been the subject of attacks and falsehoods by critics. She said in her book that she defends her policies, and her identity is not up for debate. “I am, by nature, a starter of fires,” she wrote.
  • Acclaimed Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami, hosting a special radio show from home, painted a brighter side of the world with his favorite music, and said the fight against the coronavirus is a challenge in figuring out ways to help and care for each other. The 71-year-old, known for bestsellers such as “A Wild Sheep Chase” and “Windup Bird Chronicle,” said Friday he hoped the show would “blow away some of the corona-related blues.” Murakami opened the two-hour late night show “Murakami Radio Stay Home Special” with “Look for the Silver Lining” by the Modern Folk Quartet, followed by 18 other songs, selected from classical to jazz, pop and rock. Their common thread: smile, sunshine, rainbow, birthday memories and other happy sides of life. Murakami said comparing the fight against the coronavirus to a war, as politicians often do, is inappropriate. “It’s a challenge for us to figure out how we can share our wisdom to cooperate, help each other and keep balance. It’s not a war to kill each other but a fight of wisdom to let us all live,” he said. “We don’t need enmity and hatred here.” Music serves as an important motif in Murakami’s stories. An avid listener and collector of music, he has also written books on the topic and has a library of records in his study, where Friday’s program was prerecorded. Murakami has hosted his “Murakami Radio” every two months since August 2018 on Tokyo FM. The station said Friday’s show was Murakami’s idea to cheer up those who are under stress, living under a coronavirus state of emergency still in place in parts of Japan, including Tokyo. Murakami began writing while running a jazz bar in Tokyo after graduating from university. Following his 1979 debut novel “Hear the Wind Sing,” the 1987 romance “Norwegian Wood” became his first bestseller, establishing him as a young literary star. Recent hits include “1Q84” and “Killing Comnendatore.” A perennial contender for the Nobel Prize in literature and a social recluse, Murakami said he has worked from home for years and the lifestyle has little changed, though “the corona situation” did affect him in many ways, possibly an inspiration for his future work. Murakami has written stories inspired by events that have violently shaken the society, including the 1995 Tokyo subway gassing by an apocalyptic cult and the deadly quake in Kobe, where he grew up. Rather than documenting an event as it develops, Murakami said that as a novelist he is more interested in transforming it into “a story in a different form,” though he doesn’t know when or how. The world may be experiencing “a large-scale social experiment whose results could slowly spread across the entire society, for better or worse,” he said. Murakami said he worries the post-corona world may be a more closed and selfish place even if it has better protection. “If love and compassion are lacking, the world after the corona will surely be an edgy and insipid place even if masks and vaccines are abundantly distributed,” he said. “Love is important.” ___ Other songs on the playlist: “Waiting on a Sunny Day” by Bruce Springsteen; “Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head” by Isley Meets Bacharach; “Here Comes the Sun” by Nina Simone; “You’ve Got A Friend” by Carole King; “Over the Rainbow” by Ella Fitzgerald; “Sun Is Shining” by Bob Marley & The Wailers: “What A Wonderful World” by Louis Armstrong; “Happy Birthday Sweet Darling” by Kate Taylor; “Smile” by Eric Clapton; “My Favorite Things Featuring Kathleen Battle” by Al Jarreau; “She Wore a Yellow Ribbon” by Lisa Ono; “Happy Talk” by Nancy Wilson; “They Can’t Take That Away from Me” by Brian Wilson; “Put on a Happy Face” by Tony Bennett; “Over the Rainbow” by Fred Lowery; “We’ll Meet Again” by Peggy Lee with Benny Goodman; “Mon coeur s’ouvre à ta voix” by Sigrid Onégin; “What the World Needs Now Is Love” by Wei Wei Wuu. ___ This story corrects the number of songs played. ___ Follow Mari Yamaguchi on Twitter at https://www.twitter.com/mariyamaguchi
  • Staying home under lockdown as they wait for the worst of the coronavirus pandemic to pass, millions of Indians are turning to their gods. Not in prayer rooms, but on TV. Seeking comfort in the certainty of the past, Indians are devouring reruns of popular Hindu religious dramas. They're drawing on shared experiences of Indian mythology, which is replete with tales of moral and ethical choices in times of crises and invokes the virtues of individual sacrifice for social good. The country’s public broadcaster has revived epic television shows like “Ramayan” and “Shri Krishna” — both highly revered mythological tales — airing them in prime time every night. “Shri Krishna,' a TV series originally broadcast in 1993, is an adaptation of the life of one of Hinduism’s most popular gods. In “Ramayan,” a wildly popular series from the '80s, filmmaker Ramanand Sagar tells the story of Lord Ram, the prince of Ayodhya, who was sent into exile for 14 years and rescued his kidnapped wife Sita from the demon Ravan. “When the show was first telecast, the streets used to be completely deserted and everyone watched it with devotion. The stories about the victory of good over evil were very engaging,” said Vijay Kumar Jain, a physician and gastroenterologist practicing in New Delhi and an avid fan of the dramas. On April 16, the show had a record 77 million viewers, India’s public broadcaster Prasar Bharati tweeted. “In this era of crisp and Gen Z content, these figures clearly indicate that there is still demand for values and ethos driven content in the world’s largest democracy,' Prasar Bharti said in a press release. Meanwhile, on the streets, an epic but tragic drama of another kind is playing out. Millions of poor migrant workers, hungry and in despair, have walked from cities to their villages after India's nationwide coronavirus lockdown took away their jobs and left them to fend for themselves. With India's virus caseload at more than 126,000, the economy is beginning to reopen with some restrictions. But the anxiety over what lies ahead is running high. 'Showing majoritarian mythologicals when a diverse country faces a human crisis of unparalleled scale may create an illusion of wellness,' filmmaker Dibakar Banerjee wrote in the Indian Express newspaper. “In the midst of a pandemic that levels all, the chosen and the downtrodden, many of us fantasize about a return to a golden, simple past,' he wrote. Prime Minister Narendra Modi has often invoked Hindu scriptures in his speeches during the lockdown, asking people to do their duty and follow social distancing rules to win the battle against COVID-19. “There is no bigger force than our enthusiasm and conviction. There is nothing we can’t achieve,” Modi said in a national address on April 3 , taking inspiration from a verse in the Hindu epic “Ramayan.” A court verdict last year paved the way for building a grand Ram temple on a site in northern India where Hindu hard-liners demolished a 16th-century mosque in 1992, sparking deadly religious riots. But faith transcends the politics of strident Hindu nationalism, and millions of moderate, practicing Hindus keep idols of Ram in their homes for daily prayer. “In today’s uncertain times, people are trying to make sense of their lives — who am I, what is my place in the universe,' said Jain. “And mythology offers us truth and wisdom.”
  • To anyone who's watched, there's more that binds Yamiche Alcindor, Kaitlan Collins and Weijia Jiang than an impromptu display of teamwork at a recent White House news conference. Each reporter has a knack for getting under President Donald Trump's skin and an equal ability not to let it knock them off stride. They symbolize the test of covering a White House like none other, with a president who views the press as an enemy yet is accessible almost daily. A question may elicit a candid response, misdirection, falsehood or attack — you never know what's coming. Trump has reacted to questions by Alcindor, Collins and Jiang by calling them nasty or racist, and effectively telling the journalists to pipe down. “How do you call out what's happening without making yourself the story, and refocus on what the public policy should be?” said Jessica Yellin, a former CNN White House reporter who now does a daily Instagram newcast. “It's incredibly challenging. They're showing us how it's done and figuring it out at the same time.” The unexpected cooperation came during an outdoor news conference when Jiang, of CBS News, asked Trump why his claims that the United States tested more than any country mattered at a time people were dying of COVID-19. Trump said that “maybe that’s a question you should ask China. Don’t ask me. Ask China that question.” He looked to move on but CNN’s Collins, in line to ask the next question, let the exchange play out. Jiang — who was born in Xiamen, China, and emigrated with her family to West Virginia when she was 2 — wondered why the president directed that remark to her. Trump said he would say it to “anyone who asks a nasty question.” He tried to wave off Collins and motion for the the next questioner — Alcindor. The PBS “NewsHour” correspondent waited as Collins tried to ask a question before Trump, apparently frustrated, called an end to the news conference. Jiang later tweeted thanks to both Collins and Alcindor. It was a good example — not always common — of reporters working together to prevent a president from dodging a question, said Lynne Adrine, a former Washington news producer and now professor for Syracuse University. Not everyone has the same perspective. Jiang was criticized for “grandstanding” and insinuating that Trump’s response to her question was racist. “Only a partisan hack could interpret Trump’s response as racist,” Kylee Zempel wrote in The Federalist. “The president routinely shuts down reporters who ask bogus questions, as he should.” Two years earlier, when Alcindor asked Trump about nationalism, the president labeled the question racist. More recently, he objected during a coronavirus briefing when she prefaced a question about ventilators and masks by noting that he had said some governors didn't actually need equipment that they requested. When he denied having said it, Alcindor said she quoted him from an interview with Fox’s Sean Hannity. Trump said she should be more positive. Alcindor tried again to ask her question. “Excuse me, you didn’t hear me,” Trump said. “That’s why you used to work for the (New York) Times and now you work for somebody else. Look, let me tell you something. Be nice. Don’t be threatening.” She proceeded to ask her question. Alcindor, who, like the other White House reporters was not made available to the AP for an interview, later noted that she wasn’t the first human being, woman, black person or journalist who’d been told to be nice and not threatening. Alcindor’s roots are in print journalism, and she covered Trump’s campaign for The New York Times. She joined PBS in 2018. “It should never be about me,” she said on “Pod Save America” earlier this year, “because I’m so focused on all the people in this country who will never see the White House, who will never get to speak to the president. And they deserve me to be professional and not lose my cool and to be so focused on the truth that I’m not wavering on anything else that goes on around me.” CNN’s Collins pressed forward like an automaton in a recent exchange with Trump about a whistleblower's accusations. She completed her question on the fifth try despite Trump’s attempt to stop her. “CNN is fake news. Don’t talk to me,” he said. “I watch them and I say, ‘these women are smart and they’re stoic, and they're asking questions that the public wants answers to,'” said Jill Geisler, a professor on media and leadership at Loyola University in Chicago. “They're not there to start a scene.” Collins, who came to CNN from the conservative website Daily Caller in 2017, has been tested repeatedly. The administration barred her from an outdoor news conference in 2018 and last month to force her into a seat in the back of the White House briefing room. She wouldn’t budge. This week she responded to Trump's critical retweet of a video that showed her removing a mask while leaving a news briefing by tweeting, “Nearly 90,000 Americans have been killed by coronavirus, and the president is tweeting about me pulling my mask down for six seconds.” A response that attacks rather than defends is dangerous, however. Taking the bait — and becoming known for hostile exchanges with a president — can make a reporter a hero to some and a less effective showboater to others. “There's something unique about the way television reporters try to create moments that they can use on the air,” said Trump's first press secretary, Sean Spicer. “You don't see this problem with print reporters because, generally speaking, they're not going to get on the air.” He senses reporters trying to prove themselves to colleagues. “A reporter's job is to get information and to hold people accountable,” Spicer said. “They don't have to be jackasses about it.” Trump's current press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, did not respond to a request for comment. “It's a reporter's job to do what they need to do get answers and it's a president's job to try and remain above the fray if he wants to deliver his message,” said Nedra Pickler, a former White House correspondent for The Associated Press. “This president doesn't live by those rules.” Jiang, Collins and Alcindor aren't the only reporters to tangle with Trump. CNN's Jim Acosta has turned his experiences into a book. Some believe Trump is particularly angered by tough questions from women and minorities. Spicer disagrees, noting Trump's respect for Maggie Haberman of The New York Times. “The president is a fighter,” Jiang told Syracuse University students recently. “Certain reporters I think get under his skin more than others, and you just have to be aware that you could be one of those that day.”
  • Free parking, but no valet service. Bartenders, blackjack dealers and waiters wearing masks. Hand sanitizer everywhere. Yes, dice will roll, cards will be dealt and slot machines will beckon. But poker rooms? Closed. Tourists returning to Las Vegas will see changes since gambling stopped in mid-March for the first time ever to stem the spread of the coronavirus. The stakes could not be higher, said Robert Lang, executive director of the Brookings Mountain West think tank at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. “Las Vegas can never be known as the place where people go and get sick,” he said. Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak has set a tentative June 4 date for reopening casinos. The Democratic governor said in a statement Friday that Nevada has continued to see decreasing cases of the coronavirus and hospitalizations of COVID-19 when some restrictions began to be eased nearly two weeks ago. Sisolak’s office said he plans to hold a news conference on Tuesday to offer more details about the next phase of reopening, assuming those positive trends continue through the Memorial Day weekend. Nevada’s gambling regulators also plan to meet Tuesday and will consider reopening plans submitted from casinos, which need to be approved at least seven days before reopening. “We all know what we’ve gone through for the last 10 weeks. No one’s having fun,” said Bill Hornbuckle, acting chief executive and president of casino giant MGM Resorts International. “The simple idea that I could get out, come to a resort, lay at a pool, enjoy a nice dinner, sit at a blackjack table. There’s something to be said for all of that.” Many properties have aimed for an early June restart in the gambling mecca closed almost overnight in the middle of a hot streak — three consecutive $1 billion months in statewide casino winnings. The city had been drawing more than 40 million annual visitors. Once given the green light, the marquees and the managers will welcome people back to this 24/7 town built for crowds, excitement and excess. But not every resort amenity will be open. Nightclubs, dayclubs, buffets and large venues will remain closed. Cirque du Soleil shows will stay dark, at least for now. Signs everywhere will remind guests of new rules: Wash your hands; keep distance from others; limit your elevator ride to your sanitized room to just four people. “You’re going to see a lot of social distancing,' said Sean McBurney, general manager at Caesars Palace. “If there’s crowding, it’s every employee’s responsibility to ensure there’s social distancing.” Dice will be disinfected between shooters, chips cleaned periodically and card decks changed frequently. At some resorts guests will be encouraged to use cellphones for touchless check in, as room keys, and to read restaurant menus. Wynn Resorts properties and The Venetian, owned by Las Vegas Sands, plan to use thermal imaging cameras at every entrance to intercept people with fevers. Smaller operators in Las Vegas and Reno will offer hand-sanitizer. “A gondola pilot wearing a face mask will be on board to steer the vessel,' a Venetian protocol says. “Gondoliers stationed along the canal will serenade passengers from an appropriate distance.” New state Gaming Control Board regulations require surfaces to be disinfected according to federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines and “increased attention” to high-touch hotel items like television remote controls and light switches. Guests will get free masks at large resorts, but won’t be forced to use them. For blackjack dealers, bellhops, reservation clerks, security guards, housekeepers and waiters, masks are mandatory. “That’s the most visual thing. Every employee will be required to wear a mask,” McBurney said. His footsteps echoed walking with a reporter past marble statues in the lobby toward a gilded casino vacant for the first time since it opened in 1966. A slot machine cried “Wheel of Fortune!” in the void. Seats on both sides of the game had been removed. “Visually, you’ll still see a lot of color and activity, but you won’t be able to play every machine,” McBurney said. At the neighboring Bellagio, Hornbuckle showed new hand-washing stations installed where banks of slot machines were removed. His company is losing almost $10 million a day during the shutdown, he said. Other rules: four players only at roulette, six at craps. Plastic partitions will separate dealers from players and players from each other at the Bellagio, three at each table. MGM Resorts plans to open just two of its 10 Strip properties at first: Bellagio and New York-New York. Hornbuckle promised Bellagio’s iconic dancing fountains will restart as soon as the governor sets a date. Still, just 1,200 of the hotel’s 4,000 rooms will be rented and casinos will be limited to 50% of capacity. “You’re going to see less people, by control and by design,” he said. Caesars Entertainment plans to open Caesars Palace and the Flamingo Las Vegas at first, followed later by Harrah’s Las Vegas and the casino floor at the LINQ hotel-casino. Lang called it unlikely that big crowds will return quickly, and said resort operators with deep pockets “will probably allow a bargain moment” until business improves. “First will be residents of Las Vegas. Then people getting here by car from California. Then domestic air flights. Then international,” the researcher predicted. McBurney said that with nearly 4,000 rooms at Caesars Palace, he expected just one of six towers will be occupied. “Once people know there’s an opening date ... demand will increase,” he said. “How much? I can’t speculate.”
  • Tyler Perry is planning to make his Atlanta-based mega studio one of the first domestic filming grounds to reopen during the coronavirus pandemic. But while Perry is looking to restart production in July, other studios in Georgia and beyond are anxiously waiting for Hollywood’s green light. “We’re taking the lead from our production partners,” said Frank Patterson, president of the sprawling Pinewood Studios, located in suburban Atlanta. The studio has been home to big-budget films such as “The Avengers: Endgame” and “Ant-Man” along with the television show “The Walking Dead.' “There’s not one place in the industry that’s making the decisions about when we get back to work,” he continued. “There are a lot of stakeholders. We’re working with the task forces of the studios and the guilds, unions and the associations. Just listening to everyone and making certain that when the industry decides it’s time to go back to work, that Pinewood Studios will be ready.” Georgia has become known as the Hollywood of the South with a surge of film and TV productions companies and several studios opening up over the past several years. The entertainment industry shuttered productions in March because of safety concerns during the coronavirus pandemic. With Los Angeles County still under stay-at-home orders and production shutdown, some are looking to Georgia as a possible destination to film. After Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp declared that nonessential businesses in the state could reopen in late April, Perry emerged with a strategic plan to reopen his massive 330-acre studio, which has become a production powerhouse rivaling Hollywood’s best. Perry believes he’s ready to move forward at Tyler Perry Studios to produce his own content such as the BET series “Sistas” and “The Oval.” The Hollywood Reporter obtained a 30-page production protocol document to cast, detailing health measures from testing in their hometown, traveling on a Perry-arranged private jet and doing another rapid test. Many in the industry want to see how Perry’s protocol will unfold. The Screen Actors Guild said in a statement that it's uncertain when production will return. “You’re going to have some discomfort at first that’s eventually broken by those who just want to kind of get back to the way things were,” said Kevin Hart, who filmed several projects in Atlanta including “Night School' and “Jumanji.' The actor-comedian said he would be willing to fly from his home in Los Angeles to Georgia to film if it’s a “plan that we vetted out.” Patterson said conversations between industry stakeholders about work safety protocols have been ongoing for nearly two months, and he wouldn't be surprised if “we figured out a way to return in the fall.' He said there’s “immense pressure” to get the whole industry back to work, but the health of actors and crew is the priority. “From a business point of view, if we were to jump the gun and start working, and we haven’t figured out how to do it safely, it might cost everyone in the long run,' he said. 'It would be a bad business decision and bad human decision. ... That's why we're moving a little bit more carefully and slowly than everybody wants us to.” Some in the industry's workforce are willing to take a risk, while others have a more careful stance. “I think people are more willing to take the chance of getting sick than the chance of losing their house or getting behind on bills,” said Shauna Galligan, a veteran stunt double whose credits include “Avengers: Infinity War,' “Insurgent” and “The Walking Dead.” She’s returning to work next month as a stunt coordinator for an independent film in Alabama. “I know a lot of my friends in L.A., they’re taking the precautions,” Galligan said. “I don’t know anybody that would not take work at this moment because of it. I think everybody is ready to take that risk and get life back to normal.” Actress Wynn Everett understands the collective urgency, but she would rather play things safe. “I really I love the work, but my main work is my family,” said Everett, who has made appearances on NBC’s “This is Us” and “House of Lies.” “I’m excited to go back when we go back to work. But I know, my priority right now is my kids and the safety of our family and the health of that.” Along with Perry’s studio, other studios in Georgia have implemented their own health and safety plans, but are waiting to see if they coincide with the rest of the industry. Perry declined an interview request. Pinewood is focusing on security, limiting the number of guest on sets and using a device to purify the air to try to stop the virus's spread. Another production company, Swirl Films, has recently installed LED screens and walls on their stages to create any kind of indoor or outdoor scene. When the moment is right, studios owners say they will be ready. “Film making is a glass half full,' said Eric Tomosunas, owner of Swirl Films. “We have to look at what can we do to work with the pandemic, without compromising creative goals, anyone's safety or artistic integrity. It's all about taking the right approach.' ___ AP Entertainment Writer Gary Gerard Hamilton in New York contributed to this report. _____ Follow AP Entertainment Writer Jonathan Landrum Jr. on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MrLandrum31
  • Guinean singer Mory Kante, an influential figure in African and world music, has died, his family said Friday. He was 70. Kante brought Guinean, and Mandingo, culture to the world. He was called an ambassador of Afro-Pop music. His song “Yeke Yeke,” released in the late '80s, has been remixed and covered extensively. “Guinea and the whole world have lost a great personality,' Kante's son, Balla Kante, told The Associated Press. “My father was a great personality. We lost a large library today.' Balla said his father had not been feeling well for quite some time and died in a hospital in the capital, Conakry. He will be tested for COVID-19, his son confirmed. “He was an elderly man who did a lot and exerted a lot of physical energy,' Balla said. Born on March 29, 1950 in Albadarya, a small town near Kissidougou in Guinea's southeast, Kante became known as a distinguished kora player. He was a member of the Rail Band, formed out of Bamako, Mali, which launched the solo careers of many other musicians including Salif Keita. Kante's first international album, “Kourougnègnè,” was released in 1981 and the last one, “La Guinéenne,” in 2012. Guinea's President Alpha Conde said the nation was in mourning. “Thank you, artist,' he wrote on Twitter, calling Kante's career “exceptional.' Senegalese musician Youssou N'Dour said he was dismayed by such a great loss. “I feel a huge void today with the departure of this baobab of African Culture. Rest in peace,' he wrote on his Twitter account. ___ Carley Petesch in Dakar, Senegal contributed.
  • The Recording Academy has released a new recording of John Prine's “Angel From Montgomery' with proceeds going to support the MusiCares COVID-19 Relief Fund. Prine died in April at age 73 from complications associated with the coronavirus. A two-time Grammy winner, the Recording Academy announced in December that Prine would be honored with a 2020 Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award. The new recording features artists, musicians and engineers who also are elected leaders in the Recording Academy, including singer-songwriter Christine Albert, Brandon Bush of Sugarland, John Driskell Hopkins of Zac Brown Band and Jeff Powell, an acclaimed Memphis engineer/producer. Tammy Hurt, vice chair of the Recording Academy and one of the contributors on the recording, said in a statement that Prine was known for his giving spirit and the new “Angel From Montgomery” recording is a tribute to honor that spirit.