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    Susan E. Rice, the former national security adviser and U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, has a book coming out this fall. 'Tough Love' will be published Oct. 8, Simon & Schuster announced Tuesday. She will reflect on challenges and controversies that arose during the Obama administration, including the deadly 2012 raid on a diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya. Conservatives would accuse her of making misleading remarks about the attack, the subject of extensive, Republican-led investigations. Rice said in a statement that becoming 'synonymous with Benghazi' made her anxious to tell her story. According to the publisher, she has written an 'inspiring account' of her public and private life and will offer advice on how an African-American woman can compete in a field where few share her background.
  • What's next for 'Game of Thrones?' The author, whose work was adapted into the HBO series that drew a record-setting numbers of viewers for Sunday's finale, says it's 'been a wild ride.' George RR Martin wrote on Monday that it 'was an ending, but it was also a beginning.' The 70-year-old says he's working on the next installment, 'The Winds of Winter.' He says he knows it's late 'but it will be done.' He's just not saying when. He says 'A Dream of Spring' will follow. Martin says he hears people asking will it have the same ending as the show or will it be different. Martin writes: 'Well. yes. And no.' He says he'll write it, people can read it and then everyone can 'argue about it on the internet.
  • Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver's British restaurant chain has become insolvent, putting 1,300 jobs at risk. The firm said Tuesday that it had gone into administration, a form of bankruptcy protection, and appointed KPMG to oversee the process. The company operates 23 Jamie's Italian restaurants in the U.K. Oliver, known around the world for his cookbooks and television shows, said he was 'deeply saddened by this outcome and would like to thank all of the staff and our suppliers who have put their hearts and souls into this business for over a decade.' He said 'I appreciate how difficult this is for everyone affected.
  • German authorities are handing over to Israel some 5,000 documents kept by a confidant of Franz Kafka, a trove whose plight could have been plucked from one of the author's surreal stories. The papers being returned Tuesday include a postcard from Kafka from 1910 and personal documents kept by Max Brod, which experts say provide a window into Europe's literary and cultural scene in the early 20th century. They are among some 40,000 documents, including manuscripts, correspondence, notebooks and other writings that once belonged to Brod, which are being brought together again in Israel's National Library. They had ended up in bank vaults in Switzerland and Tel Aviv, a Tel Aviv apartment and in a storage facility in Wiesbaden, Germany, where police found them tucked among forged Russian avant-garde artworks. 'I think he (Kafka) would really be amused,' said National Library archivist and humanities collection curator Stefan Litt, who helped identify the papers recovered in Germany. 'He couldn't invent by himself a better plot.' The documents recovered in Wiesbaden have little to do with Kafka himself, but make the Brod collection complete and shine a light on Brod and his circle, which included Kafka and other writers, Litt said. 'This is an important chapter in Max Brod's estate,' Litt said. 'And it's always good for researchers to have as complete a picture as possible.' Kafka, a Bohemian Jew from Prague who lived for a while in Berlin, was close friends with Brod, himself an accomplished writer. Shortly before his untimely death at 40 of tuberculosis in 1924, Kafka bequeathed his writings to Brod, reportedly telling him to burn them all unread. Instead, Brod published much of the collection, including the novels 'The Trial,' The Castle,' and 'Amerika,' helping to posthumously establish Kafka as one of the great authors of the 20th century. He also brought 'Kafkaesque' into the English language to describe a situation evoking a bizarre, illogical or nightmarish situation like the ones Kafka wrote about. After the Nazis occupied the Sudetenland region of Czechoslovakia in 1938, Brod fled to escape persecution with the entire collection to what was then British-ruled Palestine. When Brod died, he left his personal secretary Esther Hoffe in charge of his literary estate and instructed her to transfer the Kafka papers to an academic institution. Instead, she kept the documents for the next four decades and sold some, like the original manuscript of Kafka's 'The Trial,' which fetched $1.8 million at auction in 1988. She kept some of the items in a bank vault in Tel Aviv, some in Switzerland, and others at her apartment in Tel Aviv. When she died in 2008, the collection went to her two daughters, who fought to keep it but eventually lost a battle in Israel's Supreme Court in 2016. The court sided with the country's National Library, whose lawyers had argued the Kafka papers were 'cultural assets' that belonged to the Jewish people. Both daughters have now died, and the documents stored in Israel have already been transferred to the National Library's care. The documents held in Switzerland should be on their way soon after the National Library won a court case in Zurich last month, which upheld the Israeli verdict and ordered that several safe deposit boxes be opened and their contents shipped to the institution in Jerusalem. But that left the documents in Germany, which had been stolen from Hoffe's apartment about a decade ago. They ended up with an Israeli dealer, who tried in 2013 to sell them to the German Literature Archive in Marbach — the same institution that bought 'The Trial' manuscript at auction in 1988. The German archive instead reported the offer to Israel's National Library, which then got authorities involved, Litt said. The documents resurfaced at the Wiesbaden storage facility of an international forgery ring that produced and sold millions of euros (dollars) worth of forged paintings, which was taken down by German authorities that same year, Litt said. Since then, they have been stored by German authorities as Litt and others sought to confirm their provenance. Those being returned include correspondence between Brod and his wife, and even some of his notebooks from high school, Litt said. 'There's no doubt these materials were part of his papers,' he said. The manuscript of 'The Trial,' however, was properly purchased by the German Literature Archive in the 1988 Sotheby's auction, and the National Library has no claim on it, he said. 'We're happy it's in safe hands,' Litt said.
  • Elle Fanning says she fainted at a Cannes Film Festival dinner because he dress was too tight. The 21-year-old actress collapsed at the Chopard Trophee dinner Monday evening at Cannes. Fanning later posted a message with a thumbs-up photo on Instagram saying she was 'all good' despite what she called a fainting spell from her snug Prada gown. Fanning is on the jury in Cannes. She's the youngest person ever to be on the nine-person panel that will decide the Palme d'Or.
  • Twenty-five years after premiering 'Pulp Fiction' in Cannes, Quentin Tarantino is set to bring his latest, 'Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood' to the French Riviera festival Tuesday. Tarantino's 'Pulp Fiction' went on to win the Palme d'Or in 1994. His latest is expected to cause the biggest frenzy of the festival, bringing Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt and Margot Robbie to the Cannes red carpet. Ahead of the premiere of 'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,' Tarantino issued a statement to festival audiences imploring them not to spoil the film for future moviegoers. The movie is about Los Angeles in 1969. 'Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood' is premiering in competition in Cannes ahead of its theatrical release in July.
  • This Is Us' star Milo Ventimiglia learned firsthand what the Red Nose Day's fundraising campaign means to children in need, and he's eager to spread the word. 'I saw how the money was being spent, and how it's impacting these kids on a very real level and giving them a better shot at life,' the actor said after an April trip to the outskirts of Nairobi, Kenya. 'It's the simplest of corrections to get a kid educated, to get a kid healthy, to get a kid safe.' He visited a clinic vaccinating children from deadly, preventable diseases including pneumonia, and a program that houses and educates young girls who have been subsisting on landfills. Video of his encounters will be part of NBC's Red Nose Day USA special airing Thursday (8-10 p.m EDT) with host Terry Crews. Performances by Sting, Josh Groban, John Legend, Chrissy Metz, Kelly Clarkson and Blake Shelton, and a sketch with 'Saturday Night Live' players Michael Che, Colin Jost and Kate McKinnon are part of the special. Other celebrities participating include Julia Roberts, Gloria Estefan, Damian Lewis, Kal Penn, Saoirse Ronan, Ben Stiller, Chrissy Teigen, Connie Britton, Lilly Singh, Susan Kelechi Watson and Daryl Hall and John Oates. The Red Nose Day campaign , in its fifth year in America, is run by the nonprofit Comic Relief USA. It's raised close to $150 million, including through donations at Walgreens and Duane Reade stores, to support programs for children in the U.S. and other countries. Red Nose Day originated in Britain more than 30 years ago and reports more than $1 billion in donations internationally. Ventimiglia, who plays patriarch Jack on NBC's drama 'This Is Us,' made his African trip after appearing on previous Red Nose Day specials. He's also a longtime supporter of U.S. veterans' causes, including traveling with the USO to Iraq and Afghanistan. 'This was the first time that I'd been invited to see the challenges that these kids were living in,' Ventimiglia said. He witnessed children rummaging through trash dumps for items to sell and even food to eat. 'It's hard to imagine that this is average life for a human being,' the actor said, and he was glad to put the goodwill he's gained playing Jack to good use. 'Hopefully, people's familiarity with me and an interest in where I might be spending my time will lead to some good donations that are going to help kids out,' he said. ___ Online: https://rednoseday.org/
  • The Houston Rockets’ Twitter account was temporarily suspended Monday because of copyrighted music on its social media site, KHOU reported. >> Read more trending news  As of Monday evening. the NBA team’s account was still down, the television station reported. 'Our Twitter account has been temporarily suspended due to a few prior social media posts with copyrighted music,' the Rockets said in a statement. 'We are working to correct the issue now.' Twitter accounts for several college football programs, including Auburn, Iowa, Iowa State and Rutgers were suspended Saturday, along with Iowa gymnastics, also because of copyright issues, the Houston Chronicle reported. Twitter, according to its terms of service, said the company “reserve(s) the right to remove content that violates the user agreement, including for example, copyright or trademark violations, impersonation, unlawful conduct, or harassment.” U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, a big Rockets’ fan, made reference to “The Big Lebowski” in a tweet objecting to the team’s account suspension, KTRK reported, posting, “This aggression will not stand, man.”  As of Monday, the Rockets’ Twitter account had 2.8 million followers, the Chronicle reported.
  • Three handwritten wills have been found in the suburban Detroit home of Aretha Franklin, months after the death of the 'Queen of Soul,' including one that was discovered under cushions in the living room, a lawyer said Monday. The latest one is dated March 2014 and appears to give the famous singer's assets to family members. Some writing is extremely hard to decipher, however, and the four pages have words scratched out and phrases in the margins. Franklin was 76 when she died last August of pancreatic cancer. Lawyers and family members said at the time that she had no will, but three handwritten versions were discovered earlier this month. Two from 2010 were found in a locked cabinet after a key was located. The 2014 version was inside a spiral notebook under cushions, said an attorney for Franklin's estate, David Bennett. Bennett, who was Franklin's lawyer for more than 40 years, filed the wills on Monday. He told a judge that he's not sure if they're legal under Michigan law. A hearing is scheduled for June 12. Bennett said the wills were shared with Franklin's four sons or their lawyers, but that a deal wasn't reached on whether any should be considered valid. A statement from the estate said two sons object to the wills. Sabrina Owens, an administrator at the University of Michigan, will continue to serve as personal representative of the estate. 'She remains neutral and wishes that all parties involved make wise choices on behalf of their mother, her rich legacy, the family and the Aretha Franklin estate,' the statement said. In a separate court filing, son Kecalf Franklin said Aretha Franklin wanted him to serve as representative of the estate in the 2014 will. He is objecting to plans to sell a piece of land next to his mother's Oakland County home for $325,000. Judge Jennifer Callaghan in April approved the hiring of experts to appraise Franklin's assets and personal belongings, including memorabilia, concert gowns and household goods. The Internal Revenue Service is auditing many years of Franklin's tax returns, according to the estate. It filed a claim in December for more than $6 million in taxes. Franklin's star, meanwhile, hasn't faded since her death. She was awarded an honorary Pulitzer Prize in April, cited posthumously for her extraordinary career. A 1972 concert film, 'Amazing Grace,' was released with much praise from critics. The estate is involved in 'many continuing projects ... including various television and movie proposals, as well as dealing with various creditor claims and resulting litigation,' Bennett said. ___ Follow Ed White at http://twitter.com/edwhiteap
  • Apparently, takeout coffee cups aren't the only modern convenience in Westeros. >> Read more trending news  Just weeks after 'Game of Thrones' fans roasted showrunners for leaving an anachronistic coffee cup in a scene, viewers spied plastic water bottles in Sunday's series finale, CNN reported. >> Did ‘Game of Thrones’ creators make a latte lapse? Show’s art director says yes 'A water bottle in King's Landing!' Twitter user @bethisloco captioned a video of one of the gaffes. >> See the tweet here The clip quickly went viral, with more than 795,000 views, 27,000 likes and 8,000 retweets by Monday morning. Among the hundreds of replies, a second viewer shared a screenshot of a possible second bottle. 'It's not just there,' Twitter user @Yo_Bala wrote. 'I actually found the second water bottle next to Ser Davos.' >> See the tweet here Read more here.