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  • Thousands of French police are setting up checkpoints and combing Atlantic beaches to secure the southwestern coast for the world leaders who are coming for the G-7 summit this weekend. Protesters, too, are setting up camp in towns near France's border with Spain to prepare for protests during the Aug. 24-26 gathering of major world democracies. More than 13,000 police are taking up their posts for the summit, and French and Spanish intelligence officials are coordinating against any threats, French Interior Minister Christophe Castaner said Tuesday. U.S. President Donald Trump will join host French President Emmanuel Macron and the leaders of Britain, Germany, Japan, Canada and Italy in the elegant resort town of Biarritz. Authorities are closing all air, train and road traffic to Biarritz to clear the way for the leaders. That's frustrating local businesses, since this is happening at the height of Europe's summer travel season. The city's biggest beach will also be closed. Blocked from Biarritz, activists are planning events down the coast in Hendaye and Urrugne, and in the Spanish town of Irun, to protest economic injustice, climate change and other concerns. Castaner said he expected the planned protests nearby to remain peaceful, but emphasized that security forces will be present in case demonstrations turn violent, as they have in previous international summits.
  • Health authorities in Spain are on high alert after a 90-year-old woman died amid a listeria outbreak in the southern region of Andalusia that has affected more than 110 people. José Miguel Cisneros, director of the infectious disease department at Seville's Virgen del Rocío Hospital, on Tuesday announced the first casualty since the outbreak was declared on Aug. 15. Authorities have closed the pork meat supplier's plant and recalled all of its products. Cisneros said roughly half of the 114 people affected by the bacteria remain hospitalized. Health Minister María Luisa Carcedo said an investigation is looking into how the meat evaded what she called 'strict food safety controls.' Listeria is a bacteria that usually causes mild illness in healthy people but can be dangerous to pregnant women and those with weakened immune systems.
  • Soon, you could get fewer familiar ads following you around the internet — or at least on Facebook. Facebook is launching a long-promised tool that lets you block the social network from gathering information about you on outside websites and apps. The company said Tuesday that it is adding a section where you can see the activity that Facebook tracks outside its service via its 'like' buttons and other means. You can choose to turn off the tracking; otherwise, tracking will continue the same way it has been. Formerly known as 'clear history,' the tool will now go by the somewhat awkward name 'off-Facebook activity.' The feature will be available in South Korea, Ireland and Spain on Tuesday, consistent with Facebook's tendency to launch features in smaller markets first. The company did not give a timeline for when it might expand it to the U.S. and other countries, only that it will be in 'coming months.' Blocking the tracking, which is on by default, could mean fewer ads that seem familiar — for example, for a pair of shoes you decided not to buy, or a nonprofit you donated money to. It won't change the actual number of ads you'll see on Facebook. Facebook faces increasing governmental scrutiny over its privacy practices, including a record $5 billion fine from the U.S. Federal Trade Commission for mishandling user data. Boosting its privacy protections could help the company pre-empt regulation and further punishment. But it's a delicate dance, as Facebook still depends on highly targeted advertising for nearly all of its revenue. CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced the 'clear history' feature more than a year ago. The company said building it has been a complicated technical process, which is also the reason for the slow, gradual rollout. Facebook said it sought input from users, privacy experts and policymakers along the way, which led to some changes. For instance, users will be able to disconnect their activity from a specific websites or apps, or reconnect to a specific site while keeping other future tracking turned off. You'll be able to access the feature by going to your Facebook settings and scrolling down to 'your Facebook information.' The 'off-Facebook activity' section will be there when it launches. The tool will let you delete your past browsing history from Facebook and prevent it from keeping track of your future clicks, taps and website visits going forward. Doing so means that Facebook won't use information gleaned from apps and websites to target ads to you on Facebook, Instagram and Messenger. It also won't use such information to show you posts that Facebook thinks you might like based on your offsite activity, such as news articles shared by your friends. 'We do think this could have an impact on our revenue,' said Stephanie Max, product manager at Facebook, adding that this will depend on how people will use the tool. But she added that giving people 'transparency and control' is important. Off-Facebook activity is one of many pieces of information that Facebook uses to target ads to people. The changes won't affect how your actions on Facebook are used to show you ads. It also won't change the metrics Facebook sends back to advertisers to tell them how well their ads work.
  • The Latest on Britain's plan to leave the European Union (all times local): 5:10 p.m. German Chancellor Angela Merkel says the main stumbling block with Britain's departure from the European Union can be removed if a 'practical solution' is found for the Irish border issue. Speaking Tuesday after a meeting with Nordic countries in the Icelandic capital of Reykjavik, Merkel says the remaining 27 EU countries are willing to find such a solution and avoid unraveling a carefully negotiated Brexit deal agreed upon with the British government last year. The deal was repeatedly rejected by U.K. lawmakers, leading to the resignation of British Prime Minister Theresa May. She was replaced by Brexit hardliner Boris Johnson, who wants a new divorce deal. Merkel, who is hosting Johnson for talks in Berlin late Wednesday, said whichever path Britain chooses the EU is willing to cooperate closely on economic and security issues. ___ 4:30 p.m. Britain has decided to stop going to many European Union meetings unless its attendance is crucial so its diplomatic staff can better prepare for its scheduled departure from the bloc on Oct. 31. UK Secretary of State Steve Barclay said Tuesday that the diplomatic corps 'will only go to the meetings that really matter, reducing attendance by over half and saving hundreds of hours.' He says this will free up staff 'to get on with preparing for our departure on October 31 and seizing the opportunities that lie ahead.' It was another sign that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is bent on leaving the EU 'come what may' at the end of October. Beyond preparing for Brexit, Johnson has said the diplomatic staff will also be working to prepare new relationships with the 27 remaining EU nations and looking for trade agreements with other nations. ___ 11:40 a.m. European Council chief Donald Tusk says that as long as British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is not proposing 'realistic alternatives' to the backstop agreement to avoid a hard border on the island of Ireland, he is actually backing 're-establishing a border.' A key part of the divorce proposals between the EU and Britain centers on keeping the island free of physical borders between EU-member Ireland and the Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. Both sides committed to a 'backstop solution' to keep the border open in a deal with former prime minister Theresa May, but new prime minister Johnson vehemently opposes it. Tusk tweeted that 'those against the backstop and not proposing realistic alternatives in fact support reestablishing a border. Even if they do not admit it.' ___ 9:30 a.m. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has demanded that the European Union reopen Brexit negotiations, scrapping 'anti-democratic' provisions for the Irish border that he says would threaten the peace process in Northern Ireland. Johnson, who has made similar statements in the past, formally delivered his demands to the EU late Monday in a letter to Donald Tusk, president of the European Council. Johnson is calling for an end to the so-called backstop, which would keep Britain closely aligned with the European customs union if the two sides can't agree on other ways to prevent the reintroduction of border checks on people and goods moving between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar, after a one-hour call with Johnson on Monday, said the Brexit deal wouldn't be renegotiated.
  • Stocks edged lower in midday trading Tuesday, weighed down by a mixed batch of company earnings and another decline in bond yields. Financial sector stocks accounted for much of the selling as investors reacted to the decline in yields. The 10-year Treasury note slipped to 1.55% from 1.59% late Monday. When bond yields fall, it pulls down the interest rates that banks pocket on mortgages and other consumer loans. Bank of America slid 1%. Household goods makers and communication services stocks were among the decliners. Energy stocks fell along with the price of crude oil. Technology stocks, which like banks have tended to lead the market's gains recently, moved higher, having bounced back from the early slide. Apple rose 1.4% and Broadcom gained 2%. Despite the overall increase in technology stocks, chipmakers were among the biggest decliners a day after climbing on news that the U.S. gave Chinese telecom giant an extension to buy more supplies from U.S. companies. Advanced Micro Devices fell 1.9% and Nvidia dropped 1.3%. Home Depot climbed after the home improvement retailer reported earnings that topped Wall Street's forecasts. But two other big retailers didn't fare as well. Investors sent Kohl's and TJX lower after their latest quarterly report cards fell short of analysts' expectations. The market was coming off a three-day winning streak, the latest twist for the market, which has been caught in the grips of volatile trading all month. KEEPING SCORE: The S&P 500 was down 0.3% as of noon Eastern Time. The Dow Jones Industrial Average slid 57 points, or 0.2%, to 26,079. The Nasdaq, which is heavily weighted with technology stocks, dropped 0.2%. LET'S REMODEL: Home Depot jumped 4.4% after the home improvement retailer reported earnings that topped Wall Street's forecasts. The company also cut its sales expectations for the year as lumber prices slid and the company braces for the potential impact of tariffs on its customers. TURNOUT TROUBLES: Kohl's fell 4.9% after the department store reported a sharper than expected decline in sales at established locations during the second quarter. MIXED RESULTS: Shares in TJX Cos., slid 1.4% after the operator of the T.J. Maxx, Marshalls, and HomeGoods retail chains said comparable sales growth fell short of analysts' forecasts. The company also issued a third quarter earnings outlook that came in below analysts' expectations. FEELING HEALTHY: Medtronic gained 4% after the medical device maker jumped past Wall Street's fiscal first quarter financial expectations and raised its profit forecast for the year. EYE ON THE ECONOMY: Investors are trying to parse conflicting signals on the U.S. economy and determine whether a recession is looming. A key concern is that the escalating and costly trade conflict between the world's two biggest economies will hamper growth around the globe. Earlier this month, President Donald Trump announced plans to extend tariffs across virtually all Chinese imports, many of them consumer products that were exempt from earlier rounds of tariffs. Although many of the tariffs have been delayed, the founder of Chinese tech giant Huawei said Tuesday he expects no relief from U.S. export curbs due to the political climate in Washington. He expressed confidence the company will thrive because it develops its own technology.

News

  • If you have a horse you're willing to donate, Pennsylvania State Police want to talk to you. The horse must stand between 16 and 18 hands tall and be a draft or draft-cross breed. Pennsylvania State Police are asking for donations of horses to support mounted patrol units, which utilize animals deployed for security, patrol, searches and crowd control. >> Read more trending news  Once your horse retires, you are able to get your horse back. To arrange a donation, or for more information, contact Corporal Carrie Neidgigh at 717-533-3463.
  • A Nebraska teenager paid tribute to her late father through her high school senior pictures. >> Read more trending news  Julia Yllescas, a senior at Aurora High School, wanted her father to be a part of her senior pictures. Her father, Capt. Robert Yllescas, died Dec. 1, 2008, in Bethesda, Maryland, from injuries he received from an improvised explosive device while serving in Afghanistan. Yllescas had her senior pictures taken Saturday and sent them to photographer Susanne Beckmann to see if she could create an 'angel picture,' KOLN reported. Julie Yllescas loved the first two photographs that Beckmann worked on, They show her sitting and standing next to a faint shadow of her father in uniform, the radio station reported. 'Why it has hit my heart so hard is that I almost felt when I saw those pictures that he truly was there,” Yllescas told KOLN. 'And to have a piece of him with me throughout my senior year. Because sometimes it feels like where are you, why did you have to go.' Beckmann, whose husband has served in the Nebraska National Guard for 16 years, was only too happy to create the images. 'I was teary-eyed when I was editing them,' Beckmann told KOLN. 'All I could think in my head is I don't ever want to have to do this for my own kids.' Beckmann, who has run Snapshots by Suz for eight years, said she has known the Yllescas family since Julia was 9.  'I thought it would be a great idea to do these angel pictures for her as a special gift for her big milestone and to her family,' Beckmann told Cox Media Group by telephone Tuesday morning. 'I am an active duty National Guard wife, which is what inspired the idea and the vision. 'I take a lot of pictures of military families and it is always an honor for me to capture their special memories.' The photographs that include her father are a comfort for Yllescas 'Just to have that on my wall and be like, 'No, he is with me,' even though I can't physically see him,” she told KOLN.
  • A Texas elementary school teacher has a gift for her students.  Richelle Terry is promising no homework for her second- and third-grade math students for the entire school year, KBMT reported.  Terry is a teacher at Evadale Elementary. She had taught pre-K, but this is the first time she's taught the higher grade. >> Read more trending news  Instead of pouring over their math problems for hours at the dining room table, she wants her students to spend time with family and to enjoy their childhood.  'You see them, and they're like, 'I hate school. I don't like school. I don't like learning. That class is boring.' It's because they take the fun out of it. Everything is serious ... and it doesn't have to be that way,' Terry told KBMT. Terry said there should be enough time in class to finish assignments and the school has added a tutorial period for kids need extra help, according to KBMT. Terry said she will take a look at how her students are handling the no-homework rule throughout the semester. The school district allows its teachers to be flexible as long as students meet requirements, KBMT reported.
  • It will forever be called the 'great mattress migration of 2019' when the wind picked up and relocated dozens of air mattresses that were blown up for a movie-in-bed under the stars event in Colorado. >> Read more trending news  People in Stapleton, a neighborhood in Denver, couldn't believe their eyes when they saw the mattresses flying through the air and being followed by people who were trying to catch them, The Denver Post reported. Some of the mattresses that weren't caught became impromptu pool floats after they flew over a fence and landed in a pool area, KDVR reported. One man was able to record some of the craziness, uploading it to social media. Robb Manes said when he glanced over to the event's organizer she told him, 'This is a disaster,' he told the Denver Post. Manes and others spent about 30 minutes trying to catch the beds, he told the newspaper. 
  • A North Carolina man is accused of strangling his 15-year-old daughter before slitting her throat during a weekend visit at his home, sheriff’s deputies said. Joshua Lee Burgess, 32, of Monroe, is charged with first-degree murder in the death of Zaria Joshalyn Burgess. Zaria was visiting her father when she was slain. Union County Sheriff’s Office officials said in a news release that Burgess walked into the agency’s lobby just before 9:30 a.m. Sunday and told a dispatcher he was there to turn himself in. The dispatcher began searching for warrants in Burgess’ name. “He stopped her. He said, ‘You’re not going to find my name. I just killed someone,’” Tony Underwood, chief communications officer for the Union County Sheriff’s Office, told WSOC in Charlotte. “At that point, the red flags started to go off.” After Burgess gave details of the killing and told them where to find Zaria’s body, deputies went to Burgess’ home at 5102 Hampton Meadows Road, near Wesley Chapel. Inside, they found the slain teen, authorities said. A reporter with WSOC was in the courtroom Monday for Burgess’ first court appearance, where authorities offered gruesome details of the girl’s death, including how her father reportedly killed her. Reporter Tina Terry said there was a “collective gasp” when the details were revealed, according to the news station. “It’s just pure evil,” Underwood said. No motive for the slaying was given. Burgess' Facebook page is filled with photos of his daughter, who he called his “mini-me.” “I love this little angel more than anything. Nothing beats quality time with my daughter,” he wrote on a post from 2015. >> Read more trending news  Zaria’s cousin, Dytaysha Wadsworth, told WSOC the victim was a sweet girl who loved her family. She was about to start her freshman year at Monroe High School. “She was just the type of kid that would come in a room or come in a house and say, ‘Hey everybody’ -- just wanting to make everybody smile,” Wadsworth said. “She was so young, and nobody deserves to leave this world like that, especially by someone they thought was gonna protect them and be there for them.” Burgess is being held without bond in the Union County Jail.
  • The Coast Guard is searching for two boaters who didn't return from a fishing trip Friday evening off the coast of Port Canaveral, Florida. >> Read more trending news  Brian McCluney and Justin Walker were last seen leaving the 300 Christopher Columbus boat ramp Friday in a 24-foot center console boat heading toward 8A Reef. McCluney is a firefighter with the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department and Wilcox is a master technician with the Fairfax County, Virginia, Fire and Rescue Department. Update 10:50 a.m. EDT Aug. 20: The wife of one of the boaters missing since Friday morning took her search efforts into the air Tuesday, WFTV reported. Natasha Walker caught a private flight from the Titusville airport to help comb the Florida coastline as the search continues for her husband, Justin Walker, and his friend, Brian McCluney. 'They know that we want them to keep fighting,' Natasha Walker told WFTV before boarding the plane. The U.S. Coast Guard said Monday afternoon that⁩ a volunteer found a tackle bag belonging to Brian McCluney about 50 miles off the coast of St. Augustine. 'This is still absolutely a rescue mission,' Jacksonville fire Chief Keith Powers said Monday at a news conference. 'We're talking about a decorated combat vet here. We're talking about a firefighter paramedic. These guys have the skills ... to survive for a long time.' Kevin McCluney, the brother of Brian McCluney, told WFTV that if any people were resourceful enough to survive, it would be these two men. 'Between the two of them, I know they've got it locked down,' Kevin McCluney said. 'It's just a matter of time.' Brian McCluney's wife, Stephanie McCluney, told WFTV he underwent survival training during his time in the U.S. Navy and that Justin Walker is one of the most resourceful men she knows. 'If I were ever stranded anywhere, those were the two men I'd want to be stuck with,' she said. Coast Guard officials continued to search for the McCluney and Walker on Tuesday. Update 6:44 a.m. EDT Aug. 20: The search for two missing firefighters will continue Tuesday morning, authorities said. The Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department is calling on anyone who would like to help with the search and has the following items: A boat that can work in the range of 30-60 miles Binoculars A SAT phone (which is short for a satellite telephone. It’s a type of phone that connects to other phones by radio, orbiting through satellites.) Update 3:10 p.m. EDT Aug. 19: McCluney's wife said in a post on Facebook that her husband's tackle bag was found 50 miles off the shore of St. Augustine, WJAX-TV reported. The search for McCluney and his friend, Wilcox, continued Monday. Update 1:25 p.m. EDT Aug. 19: Officials with the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department said over 135 people assisted Monday with the search for McCluney and Walker. There were 36 boats searching from Brunswick, Georgia, to St. Augustine, Florida, on Monday, officials said. Searching for the missing boaters will continue until dark, JFRD officials said. Agency officials stressed Monday that the search was still a rescue mission. The missing men were raised on the water, according to JFRD. 'We're talking about a decorated combat vet here. We're talking about a firefighter paramedic. These guys have the skills,' a JFRD official said Monday at a news conference. 'These guys have the skills to survive for a long time.' Update 9:25 a.m. EDT Aug. 19: Authorities and volunteers continued to search Monday for McCluney and Walker. Coast Guard officials said Monday that crews have searched an estimated 24,000 miles since Friday. Authorities said they continued to search Monday from Port Canaveral up to Jacksonville. Officials with the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department urged people in the area to contact authorities 'if you see something ... any debris, anything.' McCluney is a Jacksonville firefighter and Wilcox is a master technician with the Fairfax County, Virginia, Fire and Rescue Department. Update 3:10 p.m. EDT Aug. 18: Multiple agencies have joined the search, On Sunday afternoon, the Coast Guard said crews are investigating reports of a debris field 50 miles east of St. Augustine, Florida, WJAX reported. However, they have confirmed it's not related to the missing boaters. Earlier Sunday, Stephanie Young McCluney, the wife of one of the missing men, thanked the efforts of the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department in a Facebook post. According to a tweet from the agency, 50 firefighters were assisting the Coast Guard with the search. The Jacksonville Association of Fire Fighters has also set up a link for those wanting to help with search efforts.  'The donations will support the search efforts and ultimately the families of the firefighters,' according to the Jacksonville Firefighter Charities donation page. 'Thank you so much for your support and prayers!' Original report: In a Facebook post Saturday, McCluney's wife said the Coast Guard has suspended the air search until Sunday morning but will continue to search by boat and radar overnight. According to Stephanie McCluney's post, the search area will move north as the Coast Guard continues to survey the coast off Volusia County throughout the night. According to the Jacksonville Association of Firefighters, McCluney is a Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department firefighter from Station 31 near Oak Hill Park. The Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department said in a Facebook post that Walker is a master technician at the Virginia fire department near Washington, D.C. The Coast Guard had deployed a search plane and several boats to look for the overdue boaters. The Navy and Brevard County Sheriff's Office are assisting with the search. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville Command Center at 904-714-7558. The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.