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    Greece's government has removed hundreds of archaeological museums, ancient sites and castles inadvertently put on a provisional list of properties up for private development under the country's bailout terms. The culture ministry said Tuesday that following careful cross-checks, 2,330 properties were taken off the portfolio of state-owned real estate scheduled for development over the next 99 years. Among them was the 4,000-year-old palace of Knossos on Crete, Greece's second most-popular ancient monument. Also, the tomb of King Philip II of Macedon —Alexander the Great's father — in northern Greece, more than a dozen museums and most archaeological sites in No. 2 city Thessaloniki, including its White Tower, were removed from the list. The list of heritage sites was compiled in June, sparking protests, but the ministry only published it Tuesday.
  • Iran's Foreign Ministry has denounced as 'hasty and incorrect' a German ban on Iran's Mahan Air from landing in the country. The official IRNA news agency Tuesday quoted Bahram Ghasemi, ministry spokesman, as saying the ban on the airline was in defiance of 'mutual relations' between the two countries. Mahan Air is on a U.S. sanctions list and Germany said Monday it banned the airline from landing in the country immediately, citing security concerns and the airline's involvement in Syria. Ghasemi expressed hope that Germany would revise the 'hasty' decision. The airline had several weekly flights between Tehran and German cities.
  • Ambulance crews on the Crimean Peninsula transported a dozen survivors of a ship fire to hospitals on Tuesday while six of their crewmates have remained missing in the Black Sea. At least 14 sailors died in the tragedy. Two Tanzanian-flagged tankers caught fire Monday while liquefied petroleum gas was being pumped from one tanker to another. The blaze spread quickly, prompting the crews to jump overboard. The ships were about 30 kilometers (15 nautical miles) off the Crimean coast when the fire started. Russian authorities said 12 of 32 crewmembers were rescued Monday in a salvage effort complicated by rough seas. Sea temperatures of about 10 C (50 F) made it hard for the crew to hold out for long. Emergency officials said they recovered 11 bodies from the water and saw another three dead but failed to recover them. Strong winds prevented a quick transfer of survivors ashore, but on Tuesday they were finally taken to hospitals in Crimea, which Russia annexed from Ukraine in 2014. The two vessels crews consisted of Turkish and Indian citizens. The ships have continued burning. Russian media reports said both tankers, the Maestro and the Candy, belonged to a Turkish company, Milenyum Denizcilik Gemi. It was sanctioned by the U.S. in 2015 for fuel deliveries to Syria. The U.S. have also placed both vessels on its sanctions lists, making any company that deals with them subject to penalties — restrictions that might explain the ship-to-ship fuel transfer at sea. Russian shipping registers indicate, however, that both tankers have made repeated calls at Russian ports recently. The Maestro sailed out of the Russian port of Temryuk on Sunday, and another vessel last called there last month.
  • Google's self-driving car spinoff Waymo said Tuesday it will bring a factory to Michigan, creating up to 400 jobs at what it describes as the world's first plant '100 percent' dedicated to the mass production of autonomous vehicles. The company plans to spend about $13.6 million to retrofit a to-be-determined manufacturing facility in the Detroit area. In exchange, it will get a state incentive grant worth up to $8 million that was approved Tuesday by the Michigan Strategic Fund Board. Waymo spokeswoman Alexis Georgeson said the company plans to hire up to 400 people to work at the factory, including engineers, operations experts and fleet coordinators. She said Waymo is looking for a site and hopes to open the plant in the middle of this year. A memo from the Michigan Economic Development Corp. says Waymo will create 100 jobs, with the potential for up to 400, and it chose Michigan despite a 'high level of interest' from states in the Midwest, South and Southwest. The company integrates its self-driving system into vehicles it buys from automakers and is currently testing autonomous Chrysler Pacifica minivans in a preferred rider program for passengers in the Phoenix area, but with human backup drivers on board. It plans to expand the service to the San Francisco area but has not given a time frame. Waymo previously announced plans to buy 62,000 Pacificas and 20,000 I-Pace electric SUVs from Jaguar. Waymo, which has a 20-employee facility in the Detroit suburb of Novi where it tests vehicles in snowy weather, will put the new factory in Wayne, Oakland or Macomb counties, where the auto industry dominates the economy with thousands of jobs from U.S. and foreign-based automakers as well as parts supply companies. 'As we begin to commercialize our business and vehicle supply grows, we're laying the foundation for a scalable, robust vehicle integration plan, starting in Michigan,' the company said in a blog. Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina law professor who studies autonomous vehicles, said the announcement shows that Waymo, which was spun off from Google and is part of parent company Alphabet Inc., has plans to integrate itself into the existing auto industry. 'You can't reinvent everything. Coming to Michigan in some ways is your complete recognition of that,' Smith said. 'Michigan is where you go in the United States to be fully immersed in automotive culture and industry.' Smith said Waymo will find abundant labor supply at a lower cost than in California, where it is now headquartered. The announcement confirms that Waymo will use the Michigan factory to produce a large number of vehicles for ride-hailing services in many cities, Smith said. But it did not say when it will deploy the vehicles without human backup drivers. 'This is an announcement about a facility to be, and the cars that will come from that facility one day,' Smith said. 'What this is is that Waymo plans to eventually expand. They've been setting that foundation for a couple of years now.' ___ Krisher reported from Detroit.
  • Spain's government lost a vote in parliament to change regulations for housing rentals on Tuesday, dealing the ruling Socialists a setback as they try to cobble together support to pass a national budget. The far-left Podemos ('We Can') party voted no, because it said the government decree didn't do enough to limit the cost of rental properties, specifically by not empowering local governments to apply rent ceilings. Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez heads a minority government and will need Podemos's support, along with that of several smaller parties, to pass his budget. If he fails to pass a budget, Sanchez will be under pressure to call an early election instead of seeing out the legislative term through 2020. Spain has endured a major increase in the price of housing rentals recently.
  • Taxi drivers striking to demand tighter regulations for companies using ride-hailing apps blocked traffic for another day in Spain's two major cities on Tuesday, while threatening to take their protest to the French border. Hundreds of taxi drivers continued to block major roads in Madrid and Barcelona, with many wearing the yellow traffic safety vest that has become the symbol of protests in neighboring France. Alberto Alvarez, spokesman for the Barcelona taxi driver association Elite Taxi, told Spanish television that 'we are talking to our colleagues in France to go to the frontier also.' The strike started in Barcelona on Friday, when some taxi drivers trashed cars operated by the app services Uber and Cabify. Taxi drivers in Madrid joined the protest on Monday. They are promising to continue to disrupt traffic flows on Wednesday, when the Spanish capital hosts a major tourism trade show. The taxi drivers in Barcelona want regional governments to force users of services of ride-hailing apps to contract rides 12 hours beforehand. Taxi drivers in both cities already went on strike against the internet-driven ride-hailing platforms in July. They complain that ride-hailing app drivers compete unfairly since they don't have the same regulations and costs.
  • Stocks across the world are down Tuesday following new signs the global economy is weakening and reports of difficulties in trade talks between the U.S. and China. The International Monetary Fund trimmed its economic forecasts for 2019 and 2020 and pointed to risks including trade tensions and rising interest rates. China's government said its economy grew in 2018 at the slowest pace since 1990. The Financial Times reported that the Trump administration canceled a proposed a meeting with Chinese trade officials this week. Technology companies skidded, and so did industrial companies, which were hurt by the slower growth forecast as well as some weak fourth-quarter earnings. Bond prices climbed as investors looked for safer investments, and oil prices fell as traders expected weaker demand. KEEPING SCORE: The S&P 500 index lost 47 points, or 1.8 percent, to 2,622 as of 3 p.m. Eastern time. The Dow Jones Industrial Average slid 408 points, or 1.7 percent, to 24,297. The Nasdaq composite fell 163 points, or 2.3 percent, to 6,994. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks dropped 29 points, or 2 percent, to 1,453. Stocks in Europe and Asia also fell. Global markets have rallied over the last month as investors began to feel that a slowdown in the world economy might not be as painful as they feared. Even with the decline Tuesday, the S&P 500 is up 4.6 percent in 2019 and has jumped 11.5 percent since hitting its recent low on Dec. 24. GLOBAL GROWTH: The IMF is now says the global economy will grow 3.5 percent this year, down from its previous forecast of 3.7 percent. Managing Director Christine Lagarde said the global economy was growing more slowly than expected as risks increase. The bank cut its estimate for growth in 2020 to 3.6 percent from 3.7 percent. Earlier in the day, China reported its economy expanded by 6.6 percent in 2018. According to the Financial Times, two officials were scheduled to travel to the U.S. ahead of meetings between the U.S. and China's top trade representatives next week. But the meetings were canceled because of a lack of progress on some critical issues, which underscores how far apart the two sides remain. Technology and industrial companies took some of the worst losses. Construction and mining equipment maker Caterpillar shed 3.8 percent to $131.35 and farm equipment company Deere fell 4.1 percent to $157.82. Among technology companies, chipmakers absorbed sharp losses. Nvidia fell 5.8 percent to $147.90 and Texas Instruments lost 3.5 percent to $95.92. THE QUOTE: 'We began last year, 2018, with a synchronized global recovery and what we have now is a slowdown globally,' said Quincy Krosby, chief market strategist at Prudential Financial. She said the reported difficulty in trade talks 'has shaken up confidence that the U.S. and China are moving closer in the negotiating phase.' METAL MELTDOWN: Aluminum products maker Arconic slumped 15.9 percent to $17.10 after it said it is no longer considering a sale. Formerly a part of aluminum giant Alcoa, Arconic said it didn't receive any offers it thought were in its best interests. The stock has gyrated over the last few months following reports the company was considering a sale. Power tools maker Stanley Black and Decker sank 15.3 percent to $115.98 after its forecast for 2019 fell short of Wall Street estimates. BONDS: Bond prices rose. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.73 percent from 2.78 percent. BUY IT NOW?: eBay jumped 6.3 percent to $32.96 after activist investment firm Elliott Management disclosed a 4 percent stake in the online marketplace and pushed it to make changes. It said eBay's classifieds and StubHub ticket resale division are both struggling, and eBay should consider separating them from its marketplace business. HOUSE OF HORRORS: Homebuilders sank after U.S. home sales cratered in December and price growth declined to the lowest level in more than six years. The National Association of Realtors said Tuesday that sales of already-built homes plunged 6.4 percent. Years of rising prices and the more recent increase in mortgage rates have both affected sales, as has the limited number of homes available for sale. Tri Pointe Group fell 4 percent to $12.04 and D.R. Horton lost 2.3 percent to $36.34. BREXIT PLAN: British Prime Minister Theresa May presented her Plan B for Britain's exit from the European Union on Monday, but it looks a lot like the original and it's not clear if she can win approval in Parliament, which gave her previous plan a resounding 'no' last week. The European Union has said it won't renegotiate the deal that Parliament already rejected. Britain is scheduled to leave the European Union in a little more than two months, and if Britain departs without a trade deal it could cause major hardships for numerous companies, especially banks. ENERGY: U.S. crude lost 2.3 percent to $52.57 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, fell 2 percent to $61.50 a barrel in London. Natural gas dropped 12.7 percent to $3.04 per 1,000 cubic feet. OVERSEAS: The British FTSE 100 index slid 1 percent. Germany's DAX and the French CAC 40 both gave up 0.4 percent. Japan's Nikkei 225 index shed 0.5 percent and the Kospi in South Korea sank 0.3 percent. Hong Kong's Hang Seng lost 0.7 percent. __ Annabelle Liang contributed from Singapore.
  • U.S. home sales cratered in December, causing price growth to slip to the lowest level in more than six years as the housing sector ended 2018 on a decidedly weak note. The National Association of Realtors said Tuesday that sales of existing homes plunged 6.4 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.99 million last month, the worst pace in almost three years. For all of 2018, sales of existing homes fell 3.1 percent from a year ago to 5.34 million units, the weakest total since 2015. 'Looking ahead to 2019, expect weaker existing-homes sales as the new year ushered in a government shutdown and worsening economic uncertainty,' said Cheryl Young, a senior economist at Trulia. Home sales have slowed after years of strong price growth and modest inventories hurt affordability. More properties are sitting on the market, as days until a signed contract increased to 46 from 40 days a year ago. Higher mortgage rates initially triggered a softening in sales around May and climbed through November when many of the contracts were finalized for December sales. But rates have stabilized in recent weeks amid concerns about the U.S. stock market and a deterioration in global economic growth. The median sales price in December was $253,600, up just 2.9 percent from last year. In a rarity, the modest price growth was eclipsed by the December increase in average hourly wages. If income gains begin to outstrip home price growth, some of the recent affordability pressures could disappear. December's price gains were the worst since a decline was posted in 2012. Sales last month fell in all four geographical regions: Northeast, Midwest, South and the West. But there is a regional divide in price gains. The Northeast posted an 8.2 percent jump in median home prices, and the South enjoyed a 2.5 percent gain. The partial U.S. government shutdown has yet to hit the housing market, although Lawrence Yun, the chief economist for the Realtors, said it could hurt sales in upcoming months by 1 percent.
  • Before you tackle lofty financial resolutions like paying off debt this year, do yourself a quick favor and freeze your credit reports. It's free, doesn't affect your credit score and helps protect your financial future. Credit reports summarize your payment history with creditors and are automatically generated by the three major credit bureaus: Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. Freezing them prevents fraudsters from opening a new line of credit using your personal information. Data breaches may feel like an annoying fact of life, but the 2017 Equifax breach dramatically increased the likelihood that your personal information is out there, waiting to be misused. 'The Equifax data breach exposed the critical financial information of more than half of the American adult population,' says Chi Chi Wu, staff attorney at the National Consumer Law Center, a nonprofit advocacy organization. Data exposed includes Social Security numbers, names, birthdates, addresses and some driver's licenses. If the Equifax breach or any others have put your information in the hands of scammers, they could get a credit card or loan in your name, rack up debt and wreck your credit. WHY YOU SHOULD FREEZE YOUR CREDIT Choosing to place a credit freeze — or not — boils down to how you think about your personal information being exposed. You could ignore it and hope nothing bad happens, or you could take action now to prevent damage. In a world where data breaches are commonplace, freezes aren't a luxury, they're a necessity. As a millennial building your financial life, you're better off protecting your credit as soon as possible. Think of it as adding a deadbolt on your front door. You hope no one will be able to get through your existing lock, just as you hope personal data like your Social Security number stays private. But by adding the deadbolt, you have an extra layer of protection in case that first lock is picked. HOW FREE CREDIT FREEZES WORK The process for placing a freeze differs slightly at each credit bureau, but you can do it online or over the phone. The freeze then blocks lenders from accessing your credit reports. If a bad actor applies for credit in your name, the lender can't see your reports to make a lending decision and won't approve the application. When you want to apply for credit, you unfreeze one or more of your reports by logging in to your account. (Experian gives you a special PIN to unfreeze the report). 'It's something you can do with your phone even as you're walking into your lender's office,' says John Ulzheimer, a credit expert who has worked at Equifax and credit scoring company FICO. You can also designate a period of time to temporarily lift the freeze, such as when shopping for a mortgage, Wu says. Your credit score — the three-digit number that is based on information in your credit reports — is not affected. (You can check your own credit reports with no consequences to your score, whether you have a freeze or not.) Freezing and unfreezing your credit reports is now free, thanks to congressional action after the Equifax breach. Parents also have the right to have credit reports created for their minor children and freeze them for free, Ulzheimer says. Freezing your children's credit helps protect them from identity theft. WHAT A CREDIT FREEZE DOES NOT DO PROTECT AGAINST SOME FORMS OF IDENTITY THEFT. A freeze stops new credit from being opened, but if someone has the details of your existing credit card, they could make fraudulent charges on it. If they have your Social Security number, they could file a fake tax return or claim Social Security benefits in your name. It's still essential to monitor your credit card transactions and other financial accounts and to report any suspected identity theft immediately, Wu says. PREVENT EXISTING CREDITORS FROM SEEING YOUR REPORTS. Lenders with which you already have a relationship can still see your credit reports. Debt collectors can also access them. STAY VIGILANT It's a good idea to check your credit reports and credit score regularly so you can act quickly if you spot an anomaly. Many personal finance websites, banks and credit card issuers offer a way to check your credit. Look for one that offers both credit score and credit report information, updates routinely and is free. _______________________________________ This column was provided to The Associated Press by the personal finance website NerdWallet. Amrita Jayakumar is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: ajayakumar@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @ajbombay. RELATED LINKS: NerdWallet: How do I get a free credit freeze? https://nerd.me/pros-cons-freezing-credit FTC: Report identity theft https://www.ftc.gov/faq/consumer-protection/report-identity-theft
  • The Republican Party believes it finally has its answer to the Democratic fundraising behemoth ActBlue. GOP groups are lending their support to a new donor platform called Patriot Pass, which they say will help the party match and even surpass the organization that sent more than $700 million to Democratic campaigns in 2018. After the Republican Party's midterm losses, party officials said they needed to find a way to match the small-dollar fundraising power of ActBlue. The Republican platform is a joint effort of GOP payment processing firm Revv and the party's data clearinghouse, DataTrust. Revv founder Gerrit Lansing, who briefly worked as White House chief digital officer, said that combination will help the GOP pass Democrats. Democrats are playing a game of catch-up of their own, struggling to create a hub for their data to rival DataTrust. Patriot Pass is meant to allow the GOP to unite its donor and political databases, helping the party to improve its small-dollar fundraising and understanding of the electorate. The GOP platform will allow one-click donations, like ActBlue does, to candidates and committees on the political right, leading to more streamlined donations to Republican causes. 'Reducing the friction increases donations,' said Lansing, who said the party studied ActBlue and e-commerce sites. An advantage of Patriot Pass over ActBlue, Lansing said, is its reliance on the technology and security of Silicon Valley payment processor Stripe. GOP groups don't expect Patriot Pass to match ActBlue's fundraising immediately but believe as the 2020 election gets into high gear it will help level the playing field on small-dollar fundraising, which has long been a Democratic advantage. By the end of next month, President Donald Trump's re-election campaign, the Republican National Committee and the GOP's two congressional arms will be live on the new platform, Lansing said. By midyear, he said, they hope to have individual candidates and outside organizations on board. The rollout was made in conjunction with the Tuesday start of the winter meeting of the RNC's governing body in New Mexico. News of the new GOP donor platform was first reported by Politico.

News

  • Producers of the Pepsi Super Bowl LIII Halftime Show are looking for people to participate in the halftime show at Mercedes-Benz Stadium on Feb. 3. About 450 people are needed to be part of the “Field Team” that will help move the halftime show stages and scenic elements on and off the field. Channel 2 Action News Sports Director Zach Klein talked with officials on Tuesday who said they're still looking for more 'Field Team' members. Maroon 5, Big Boi and Travis Scott are headlining the Super Bowl LIII Halftime Show. Our LIVE Team 2 Coverage of Super Bowl LIII continues on Channel 2 Action News starting at 4 p.m. We're getting a behind-the-scenes look at the Super Bowl Experience + talking with cyber security experts working to keep you and the city safe. “Field Team” members must be able to attend all scheduled rehearsals, be over the age of 18 and be in good physical health. No prior experience is required. Anyone interested in applying can view the rehearsal schedule HERE. If it fits your schedule, CLICK HERE to apply for a position. NOTE: “Field Team” members will not receive tickets or the opportunity to watch the Super Bowl. However, they will be an integral part of the halftime show.
  • A man identified by authorities Tuesday as the suspect in the fatal shooting of a teenager at a suburban Chicago mall was previously convicted of armed robbery and had been an acquaintance of the victim. Orland Park Police identified the suspect as 19-year-old parolee Jakharr Williams of University Park. The department said in a news release that Williams, who fled after the shooting and has not been arrested, should be considered armed and dangerous. Police said Williams and 18-year-old Javon Britten of Richton Park were arguing in a food court at Orland Square Mall Monday when Williams allegedly pulled out a handgun and fired several shots. Britten was struck and a bystander's leg was grazed by a bullet. Police said Britten staggered to a nearby clothing store, where he collapsed. He was pronounced dead at Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn a short time later. According to the Illinois Department of Corrections website and Orland Park Police, Williams was convicted of armed robbery in 2017, and that he served a little more than a year in prison before he was released in June last year. Orland Park is about 20 miles (32 kilometers) southwest of Chicago.
  • In the legal equivalent of a Hail Mary pass, two New Orleans Saints season ticket holders have asked a judge to reverse the result of the NFC championship game that sent the Los Angeles Rams to the Super Bowl — or order a do-over. Tuesday's state court filing says NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell should implement a league rule governing 'extraordinarily unfair acts.' Remedies include reversal of a game's result or the rescheduling of a game — in its entirety or from the point when the act occurred. At issue is the failure of officials to call interference or roughness penalties when a Rams player leveled a Saints receiver with a helmet-to-helmet hit at a crucial point in Sunday's game. The NFL hasn't yet responded. A hearing is scheduled Monday.
  • A man is under arrest in Utah after police say he posted on Facebook about 'killing as many girls as I see' the same weekend that Women's Marches were held around the U.S. Christopher W. Cleary, 27, wrote he wanted to be 'the next mass shooter,' because he had never had a girlfriend and he was still a virgin, according to jail documents filed by police in the city of Provo. He wanted to 'make it right' with women who had turned him down and also said 'there's nothing more dangerous than a man ready to die,' the documents said. Cleary is from Denver and Colorado police on Saturday contacted officers in Provo, south of Salt Lake City, where Cleary had checked into an AirBnB rental a day earlier. With help from the FBI, officers tracked Cleary to a restaurant and arrested him on suspicion of a felony threat of terrorism charge. The posts did not mention the marches but investigators were concerned because they were happening that day in Provo and Salt Lake City, along with dozens of other cities, the documents said. Cleary acknowledged making the posts, but said he deleted them after receiving threats in response, police said. He told investigators he had an impulse-control disorder and was suicidal. Colorado authorities said Cleary is on probation after stalking and threatening women there, according to Utah police documents. He was being held without bail in Utah, and authorities were expected to seek his extradition to Colorado. No attorney or publicly listed phone number was immediately available for Cleary.
  • Country singer John Berry revealed he is battling tonsil cancer, Billboard reported Tuesday. Berry, 59, announced the cancer in a video he recorded with his wife, Robin Berry, and posted to his Facebook page.  “We started off this year with a hiccup, and we want to tell you a little bit about that,” John Berry said in the video.  It is not the first time Berry has experienced a medical scare. On the day his song “Your Love Amazes Me” hit No. 1 in 1994, Berry had surgery to remove a benign brain tumor, Billboard reported. Berry said he became aware of his latest health issue in November before his latest tour, the magazine reported.“I had a little catch in my throat, it felt like, it felt exactly like, the skin of a Spanish peanut was stuck in my throat,” Berry said in the video.  After examining his tonsils Berry noticed they were swollen. Despite going to a doctor and receiving steroids and antibiotics, the problem persisted, Berry said. He completed his tour and then saw a doctor Jan. 4, Rolling Stone reported. A CT scan revealed two tumors in his tonsils, so he had surgery to remove them, the magazine reported. After receiving biopsy results, doctors told Berry he had tonsil cancer. Berry will begin a five-week chemotherapy and radiation treatment plan this week, Rolling Stone reported. “This particular cancer is one of the most highly treatable, and has an incredible cure rate,” Berry said in his video. According to his website, Berry had 20 singles on the country charts during the 1990s, six of which were Top 5 songs. He won a Grammy Award in 1996 for his participation in “Amazing Grace: A Country Salute to Gospel, Vol. 1.”
  • Atlanta police are investigating a sexual assault at Opera nightclub after video of the incident was posted on Facebook.  >> Read more trending news Officer Jarius Daugherty said the Atlanta Police Department began receiving calls from people who had seen the assault on a Facebook Live video early Sunday morning. The police department has opened an investigation into the incident at the club on Crescent Avenue in Midtown. The video “appears to show a woman being sexually assaulted in a local nightclub,” Daugherty told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.  Police have not released details on the alleged assault, but the woman filed a police report on the crime. It is the policy of the AJC to not name victims of sexual crimes. According to WSB-TV, the victim was celebrating her birthday Saturday at the popular Midtown nightclub when she was sexually assaulted. The woman told police someone put drugs in her drink and then sexually assaulted her on the dance floor, WSB-TV reported. The victim, who was already streaming her celebration on Facebook Live, captured the attack as it happened and continued to stream the video. According to media reports, the woman is heard in the video screaming for help. Video of the sexual assault has since been removed from Facebook. The woman later posted a video saying she is OK, WSB-TV reported.  In a statement posted to Facebook and Twitter, Opera nightclub managers said they are cooperating with the investigation.  “At this time we have met with the Atlanta Police Department and have provided them with everything they have requested,” read the statement posted Sunday. “We will continue to aid and support their investigation in any way we can.”