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Atlanta's Evening News & Erick Erickson

5-7PM

Erick Erickson

Atlanta’s Evening News & Erick Erickson

Erick Erickson practiced law for six years and oversaw a number of political campaigns at the federal, state, and local levels. He was also an elected city councilman in Macon, Georgia. 

In addition to hosting a show on WSB radio Erickson is a Fox News contributor after spending three years at CNN. He has also appeared on the Colbert Report on Comedy Central. According to Newsweek, “Erickson has grabbed his party’s power brokers by their elephant-stitched suspenders. Avid readers include Rush Limbaugh, former senator Fred Thompson and … John Boehner.” 

Erickson is known for a willingness to speak candidly about and challenge the Republican establishment as well as rally conservatives to push their agenda at both the federal and state level. He has used his position to help raise the profile of a number of conservative candidates across the country from Marco Rubio in Florida to Nikki Haley in South Carolina to Ted Cruz in Texas. 

The London Telegraph named Erickson the sixty-fifth most influential conservative in America in 2010. He is co-author of the book RedState Uprising. Each weekday morning, Erickson writes his “Morning Briefing” email, widely considered a must read among conservative pundits and activists. “The ability of [Erickson's Morning Briefing] to shape a message illustrates the power of the conservative network,” according to Washington Post. The Hollywood Reporter describes Erickson as "the most influential conservative blogger on the Internet." 

Erick Erickson earned a Bachelor of Arts with honors at Mercer University in Macon, Georgia, majoring in History and Political Science. He earned his juris doctorate at Mercer’s Walter F. George School of Law. 

Wrap up your day with him on the air weeknights on News 95.5 and AM-750 WSB.

The Erick Erickson Show 01-17-19

Topics: Tonight on the show President Trump vs Nancy Pelosi, reporters attack Karen Pence and the Knight of Columbus for being christian, Tom Graves sells out Jody Hice and Governor Kemp lays out his plan for Georgia in his State of the State address.
Posted: January 17, 2019

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The Erick Erickson Show 01-16-19

Topics: Tonight on the show Erick sits down with Georgia's governor Brian Kemp.
Posted: January 16, 2019

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The Erick Erickson Show 01-10-19

Topics: Tonight on the show RBG may not be doing as well as reported post surgery, more chatter about an emergency declaration and paper vs electronic ballots.
Posted: January 10, 2019

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Local Politics
Weeks before the Super Bowl comes to Mercedes-Benz Stadium, with boosters estimating a $400 million boon to Atlanta’s economy, a group of local residents is fighting for the stadium itself to contribute to the pot. For a year and a half, some residents have argued that the stadium — which has been exempted from property taxes since it was built — should be paying into city, school and county tax funds. A lawsuit the group filed in 2017 estimates its tax bill at $26 million a year under June 2018 tax rates. If the suit filed against the Fulton County Board of Assessors were to succeed, it could have implications for other stadiums around the country that also are exempted from property taxes. Over the life of a 30-year agreement the Falcons have to use the stadium, it might generate more than $700 million in property taxes, according to estimates by attorney Wayne Kendall, who is representing the residents who filed the suit. His estimate is based on the $1.5-billion stadium paying current property tax rates for Fulton County, Atlanta and the Atlanta Public Schools across three decades. “I just believe the public is getting screwed on the deal,” Kendall said. “The Falcons aren’t paying the $26 million they should be paying, and everyone else will have to make up the difference.” Fulton County property values have skyrocketed in recent years, and residents have complained about too-high tax bills. The county worked to reduce the tax burden by freezing values in 2017, a move they’re still fighting for in court. Residents also passed a number of referenda last year that are designed to limit some tax increases. The case was dismissed by Fulton County Superior Court, but Kendall appealed and the lawsuit was kept alive by the state appeals court last month. The suit, now back before Fulton County Superior Court, argues that the Fulton County Board of Assessors erred when it decided the stadium was tax exempt. Mercedes-Benz Stadium was funded through a combination of loans to the Falcons, money from the NFL, sales of permanent seat licenses and $200 million in bonds backed by Atlanta hotel-motel taxes. But it’s owned by the Georgia World Congress Center Authority, a state agency that also owns the largest convention center in Georgia. The Falcons have an agreement with the authority to operate the stadium for 30 years. Kendall, in the suit, said that’s the issue: When the Falcons played at the Georgia Dome, the Dome was exempt from paying property taxes because it was owned by the state. At the Dome, the Falcons had an agreement to use the facility for 20 days each year. The rest of the time, the GWCCA managed the building and received all the revenue from concessions, merchandise and private suite sales. The Falcons only got revenue from ticket sales at their home games, the suit said. But at Mercedes-Benz, the agreement is different: The Falcons manage the stadium year-round, and receive the revenue from all events held in the building, not only ticket revenue. Kendall argues that under the new agreement,the Falcons are a long-term leaseholder, and long-term leases are taxable under state law. Victor Matheson, a sports economist at College of the Holy Cross, said while there are some stadiums that pay property taxes, the vast majority do not. There are questions about whether that’s right, he said — after all, “there’s no fundamental reason why a football stadium shouldn’t pay property taxes.” But he said the case is a long shot. If it succeeds, he said, it could have ripples for stadiums across the country, as many agreements are set up in a similar fashion. “I wish them luck, but it’s probably unlikely,” he said. “If this domino were to fall … that would be a real game changer nationwide.” Still, he said, team owners are likely to seek other subsidies from local governments if a property tax exemption disappears. Both Fulton County and the Falcons declined to comment on the suit. But in their court filings, attorneys for the county Board of Assessors said the Falcons hadn’t been granted a long-term lease, but had instead been given a license to use the stadium property. Those cannot be taxed, under state law. In other news: Kendall said in filings that the final agreement on the stadium lease was never reviewed by the Board of Assessors as required by law. He also said the Georgia World Congress Center Authority’s tax exempt status was never approved in a statewide referendum and was therefore unconstitutional. While an earlier judge dismissed the constitutionality claim among others, appeals court judges said that is one aspect that should be reconsidered. Kendall said he didn’t understand why Fulton County — which would benefit from more tax dollars — was arguing the case. “I don’t know why they’re fighting it,” he said. “It’s in their best interest to collect the taxes. Somehow, the roles have gotten perverted here.” Andrew Zimbalist, an economics professor at Smith College, said the San Francisco Giants are among the teams that pay property taxes at the stadium. In Massachusetts, he said, state law doesn’t allow teams to “simply disguise what in practice is true ownership” of a stadium. Sports economist Matheson said the exemptions amount to a “pretty big handout” to stadiums. “My gut reaction is it’s clever,” he said. “More power to them.”
The Atlanta's Evening News Team
Atlanta news, traffic and weather. Breaking stories from around the Metro Area. Coverage you can depend on from News 95.5 AM750 WSB.
Follow Erick Erickson on Twitter

Follow Erick Erickson on Twitter

News

  • Police confirmed to Channel 2 Action News that the driver accused of hitting and killing a pedestrian has turned himself in.  Gabriel Cammon, 20, came forward to Smyrna police after he saw Channel 2 Cobb Bureau Chief Chris Jose  report on Thursday's deadly crash. Police said the victim Raul Dominguez was trying to cross a busy stretch of South Cobb Drive when the Cammon hit him with his pickup truck. A witness told Jose that the driver got out of the car but the driver panicked and fled the scene. We're speaking exclusively with the family of the driver about the charges he is facing, on Channel 2 Action News starting at 4 p.m.  “He’s a good man. I hate to see this happen to him.” Police say a hit & run driver who allegedly killed a pedestrian on South Cobb Drive, turned himself in after our story aired on Friday. The man’s family says he made a mistake by leaving the scene, Live at 4. @wsbtv pic.twitter.com/tQDQznNy5r — Chris Jose (@ChrisJoseWSB) January 22, 2019
  • Producers of the Pepsi Super Bowl LIII Halftime Show are looking for people to participate in the halftime show at Mercedes-Benz Stadium on Feb. 3. About 450 people are needed to be part of the “Field Team” that will help move the halftime show stages and scenic elements on and off the field. Channel 2 Action News Sports Director Zach Klein talked with officials on Tuesday who said they're still looking for more 'Field Team' members. Maroon 5, Big Boi and Travis Scott are headlining the Super Bowl LIII Halftime Show. Our LIVE Team 2 Coverage of Super Bowl LIII continues on Channel 2 Action News starting at 4 p.m. We're getting a behind-the-scenes look at the Super Bowl Experience + talking with cyber security experts working to keep you and the city safe. “Field Team” members must be able to attend all scheduled rehearsals, be over the age of 18 and be in good physical health. No prior experience is required. Anyone interested in applying can view the rehearsal schedule HERE. If it fits your schedule, CLICK HERE to apply for a position. NOTE: “Field Team” members will not receive tickets or the opportunity to watch the Super Bowl. However, they will be an integral part of the halftime show.
  • A man identified by authorities Tuesday as the suspect in the fatal shooting of a teenager at a suburban Chicago mall was previously convicted of armed robbery and had been an acquaintance of the victim. Orland Park Police identified the suspect as 19-year-old parolee Jakharr Williams of University Park. The department said in a news release that Williams, who fled after the shooting and has not been arrested, should be considered armed and dangerous. Police said Williams and 18-year-old Javon Britten of Richton Park were arguing in a food court at Orland Square Mall Monday when Williams allegedly pulled out a handgun and fired several shots. Britten was struck and a bystander's leg was grazed by a bullet. Police said Britten staggered to a nearby clothing store, where he collapsed. He was pronounced dead at Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn a short time later. According to the Illinois Department of Corrections website and Orland Park Police, Williams was convicted of armed robbery in 2017, and that he served a little more than a year in prison before he was released in June last year. Orland Park is about 20 miles (32 kilometers) southwest of Chicago.
  • In the legal equivalent of a Hail Mary pass, two New Orleans Saints season ticket holders have asked a judge to reverse the result of the NFC championship game that sent the Los Angeles Rams to the Super Bowl — or order a do-over. Tuesday's state court filing says NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell should implement a league rule governing 'extraordinarily unfair acts.' Remedies include reversal of a game's result or the rescheduling of a game — in its entirety or from the point when the act occurred. At issue is the failure of officials to call interference or roughness penalties when a Rams player leveled a Saints receiver with a helmet-to-helmet hit at a crucial point in Sunday's game. The NFL hasn't yet responded. A hearing is scheduled Monday.
  • A man is under arrest in Utah after police say he posted on Facebook about 'killing as many girls as I see' the same weekend that Women's Marches were held around the U.S. Christopher W. Cleary, 27, wrote he wanted to be 'the next mass shooter,' because he had never had a girlfriend and he was still a virgin, according to jail documents filed by police in the city of Provo. He wanted to 'make it right' with women who had turned him down and also said 'there's nothing more dangerous than a man ready to die,' the documents said. Cleary is from Denver and Colorado police on Saturday contacted officers in Provo, south of Salt Lake City, where Cleary had checked into an AirBnB rental a day earlier. With help from the FBI, officers tracked Cleary to a restaurant and arrested him on suspicion of a felony threat of terrorism charge. The posts did not mention the marches but investigators were concerned because they were happening that day in Provo and Salt Lake City, along with dozens of other cities, the documents said. Cleary acknowledged making the posts, but said he deleted them after receiving threats in response, police said. He told investigators he had an impulse-control disorder and was suicidal. Colorado authorities said Cleary is on probation after stalking and threatening women there, according to Utah police documents. He was being held without bail in Utah, and authorities were expected to seek his extradition to Colorado. No attorney or publicly listed phone number was immediately available for Cleary.
  • Country singer John Berry revealed he is battling tonsil cancer, Billboard reported Tuesday. Berry, 59, announced the cancer in a video he recorded with his wife, Robin Berry, and posted to his Facebook page.  “We started off this year with a hiccup, and we want to tell you a little bit about that,” John Berry said in the video.  It is not the first time Berry has experienced a medical scare. On the day his song “Your Love Amazes Me” hit No. 1 in 1994, Berry had surgery to remove a benign brain tumor, Billboard reported. Berry said he became aware of his latest health issue in November before his latest tour, the magazine reported.“I had a little catch in my throat, it felt like, it felt exactly like, the skin of a Spanish peanut was stuck in my throat,” Berry said in the video.  After examining his tonsils Berry noticed they were swollen. Despite going to a doctor and receiving steroids and antibiotics, the problem persisted, Berry said. He completed his tour and then saw a doctor Jan. 4, Rolling Stone reported. A CT scan revealed two tumors in his tonsils, so he had surgery to remove them, the magazine reported. After receiving biopsy results, doctors told Berry he had tonsil cancer. Berry will begin a five-week chemotherapy and radiation treatment plan this week, Rolling Stone reported. “This particular cancer is one of the most highly treatable, and has an incredible cure rate,” Berry said in his video. According to his website, Berry had 20 singles on the country charts during the 1990s, six of which were Top 5 songs. He won a Grammy Award in 1996 for his participation in “Amazing Grace: A Country Salute to Gospel, Vol. 1.”