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Top tweets about Joe Namath's coat

While advertisers spent millions of dollars to get exposure during the Super Bowl, it was Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Namath who garnered the most attention on social media. When the football hero appeared on the field for the coin toss wearing a massive fur coat, Twitter and other sites buzzed with jokes. The reaction to most ads was much more muted.

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  • Investigators have released photos and surveillance video in hopes of identifying the gunmen who killed a restaurant manager during a robbery this weekend. According to police, three men entered Barcelona Wine Bar on Howell Mill Road in the West Midtown neighborhood as it was closing around 1:45 a.m. Sunday, and tied up the employees with electrical tape.  The men then forced the manager, 29-year-old Chelsea Beller , upstairs to open up the safe. That’s when they shot her. Beller later died at Grady Memorial Hospital.  'I think it's important for us all to acknowledge that this isn't Atlanta. This isn't the Wild Wild West,' Beller's friend Tyler Walters said.  @Atlanta_Police just released this dramatic surveillance from inside Barcelona wine bar of Sunday’s deadly robbery. https://t.co/YHueSecqL7 Police need your help. $7k reward for info. @wsbtv pic.twitter.com/QJG5xHIZMv — Aaron Diamant (@AaronDiamantWSB) November 20, 2017 As Channel 2’s Carl Willis went through the new video, he saw Atlanta police back at the scene looking for evidence in the shooting. Beller's friends say the 29-year-old considered co-workers and restaurant regulars her family. TRENDING STORIES: Police release dramatic video, photos of gunmen who killed restaurant manager Out with a bang: Georgia Dome comes down in Atlanta Grandmother says Facebook Live saved her life: 'I could have died' 'She was the salt of the earth. She was the type of person that had a genuine sense of caring,' Walters said. “She loved coming to work. She loved what she did. It was just a place that she felt happy and she enjoyed what she did.' Investigators are hoping that even though the suspects' faces are masked, that someone might have an idea who they are, and bring a little peace to those grieving over Beller’s loss.  “Money is money, but killing young ladies who are in the prime of their lives, that's not who Atlanta is,' Walter told Willis.  A reward of up to $7,000 is being offered for information leading to an arrest and indictment. The Atlanta Police Department released a statement about the incident, saying:  “No crime against our citizens, anywhere in the city, is acceptable. But the robbery and murder of an innocent restaurant manager doing her job is a terrible crime that has shocked even the most jaded among us here at APD,' the department said in a statement Monday. 'We have made fighting violent crime our priority, and this incident underscores that our work is never done. Our investigators are working diligently to find those responsible for this crime. We will continue to focus our efforts on identifying and apprehending violent repeat offenders who prey on innocent people. These crimes are unacceptable, and we will not rest in our pursuit of shutting down these violent criminals.” Anyone with information on the shooting is asked to contact police through Crime Stoppers Atlanta . Their phone number is 404-577-8477 and you can remain anonymous.
  • UPDATE: Coosa County sheriff's officials said the man has been captured in DeKalb County. Channel 2 Action News has learned that an armed man who authorities said escaped an Alabama jail may now be in metro Atlanta. Shane Anthony Vernon escaped the Coosa County Jail Sunday, local authorities said.   On Tuesday, U.S. Marshals told Channel 2 Investigative Reporter Nicole Carr that Vernon kidnapped a man from Alabama and dropped him and the car off in Douglasville. Vernon was nowhere to be found. TRENDING STORIES: Ex-Braves GM banned for life by MLB; Atlanta loses prospects 60+ people fall ill after company Thanksgiving party Jailhouse phone calls reveal aftermath of deadly heroin-fueled crash Vernon is considered armed and dangerous. Coosa County Sheriff Terry Wilson explained the timeline to Carr Tuesday afternoon. He told Carr on Oct. 30, Vernon got out of handcuffs during booking for another home invasion. 'He pulled out his restraints and ran out the jail,' Wilson told Carr by phone. Out of the jail and into the woods we're told he went. He was captured almost immediately. But on Sunday, things changed. 'He was allowed to use one of the inmate telephones in the jail. And a corrections officer did not properly secure the door,' Wilson explained. It was an officer's actions that led to a second escape and now an internal investigation. 'He was able to climb through the ceiling and go over four other secured doors to get to the other side and went out the door again.' A map takes on Vernon's crime spree after his jail ceiling escape. There were residents tied up and robbed on Sunday. On Monday, a family including a 2-year-old child, were tied up as Vernon continued to steal cars, guns and a bike. Finally on Monday night, as he tried to hide a stolen van, he forced an Elmore County man into a car and drove him to metro Atlanta. That's where the man somehow escaped Vernon Tuesday morning and made it to the Douglasville Police Department while Vernon took off to parts unknown. 'It's a tragedy all the way around. I just hope that we can get him picked up before he hurts somebody,' Wilson said. The sheriff said they'll be processing the stolen car and have a better idea of how this happened by tomorrow morning.   CONFIRMED w/Alabama Sheriff: This is the second time in three weeks that Shane Vernon has escaped the Coosa Co. jail. Sunday’s escape was through ceiling tile exit. Now may be in Metro ATL armed, dangerous, authorities say @wsbtv pic.twitter.com/H3VJbpY74B — Nicole Carr (@NicoleCarrWSB) November 21, 2017
  • A Chestatee High School coach engaged in unwanted sexual contact with a female student in Hall County, deputies said. Webster Demetrius Daniel was charged with sexual assault against a student and sexual battery. Daniel was the school's girls basketball coach. Investigators with the Sheriff’s Office opened a criminal investigation on Nov. 17, a day after the matter was referred by school administrators. The 42-year-old was later arrested at a home in the 4700 block of Autumn Rose Trail. According to the Gainesville Times, Daniel submitted his resignation for his teaching position, which will be acted upon at the Hall County Board of Education meeting on Monday. Daniel was booked in at the Hall County Jail.  This case remains under investigation by the Hall County Sheriff’s Office.
  • Hurricane Maria destroyed most everything in Puerto Rico, including the island’s schools.  By one estimate, up to 300,000 children will head north to the U.S. mainland to get an education over the next two years. >> Read more trending news Hundreds of children have arrived in Massachusetts so far, and it’s putting a strain on school systems that are already stretched thin. Orlando Rios Guzman just relocated to Lawrence with his two daughters. Twelve-year-old Coralyz will be enrolling in the seventh grade and nine-year-old Leyshka will enter the fourth grade.  On the eve of their first day, they were all nervous about this big change.  Through an interpreter, he said he was concerned about the language barrier and about whether they would feel comfortable in new schools.  Guzman and the girls are staying in an apartment with relatives. He made the trip because he was concerned the entire school year would be lost and the girls were not getting any education. As American citizens, children from Puerto Rico have the right to move to any state and enroll in public school. Since the hurricane, almost a thousand children have come to Massachusetts schools. The districts seeing the biggest spikes in enrollment are Boston, Holyoke, Lawrence, Springfield, and Worcester. Worcester school superintendent Maureen Binienda said the biggest financial challenge so for far is associated with translating Individual Education Plans of special education students which were all delivered in Spanish. About two-thirds of the students from Puerto Rico in Worcester are special needs students. Right now, Binienda said the district has absorbed about 170 children without too much of a problem, but she’s watching the situation closely.  “If we continue to receive students at the rate we have in the last couple of weeks, we will probably need some funding to add additional teachers,' Binienda said. 'We have certain regulations set for us by the union contract on how many students can be in a class.” Helping these communities should be a priority for the state before it becomes a full-blown crisis, according to Keri Rodrigues of Massachusetts Parents United.  “In addition to wanting to set them up for educational success, we need to emotionally support these kids who have just gone thru one of the most traumatic experiences of their entire lives. Everything has been ripped away from them,' Rodrigues said. Even though it has been more than two months since Hurricane Maria did just that, the island exodus could just be getting underway. “When you have folks that are low income, it takes some time and resources to actually make sure that you have the money to buy those plane tickets, to bring your family over from the island to those communities,” explained Rodrigues. A spokesperson from The Department of Elementary and Secondary tells they’re tracking students from both Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands as they enroll in public schools. Based on those numbers, the administration will request additional money from the legislature to help communities deal with increased costs.
  • Bring on the turkey — but maybe hold the politics.Thanksgiving is Glenn Rogers' favorite holiday, when people gather around the table and talk about things to celebrate from the past year. But Donald Trump's presidency isn't something everyone in the Rogers family is toasting.'For the most part, we get to the point where we know that we're not going to agree with each other and it gets dropped,' says the 67-year-old manufacturing consultant, who says he voted less for Trump than against Democrat Hillary Clinton.With a cascade of sexual misconduct scandals now echoing similar allegations against Trump during the campaign, tempers on the subject of Trump may not have cooled, says Rogers. 'When you start talking about it now, there's still some, I think, real animosity when you start talking about character.'Rogers is among more than a third of Americans who say they dread the prospect of politics coming up over Thanksgiving, compared with just 2 in 10 who say they're eager to talk politics, according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Four in 10 don't feel strongly either way.Democrats are slightly more likely than Republicans to say they're uneasy about political discussions at the table, 39 percent to 33 percent. And women are more likely than men to say they dread the thought of talking politics, 41 percent to 31 percent.Those who do think there's at least some possibility of politics coming up are somewhat more likely to feel optimistic about it than Americans as a whole. Among this group, 30 percent say they'd be eager to talk politics and 34 percent would dread it.The debate over whether to talk politics at Thanksgiving — or not — is about as American as the traditional feast itself. By Christmas 2016, 39 percent of U.S. adults said their families avoided conversations about politics, according to the Pew Research Center.But Americans are still trying to figure out how to talk about the subject in the age of Trump, and amid the sexual misconduct allegations that have ignited a new debate over standards for conduct between men and women. The conversation, some analysts and respondents say, touches on identity among people who group themselves by other factors, such as family, friendship or geography.Ten months into Trump's difficult presidency, he remains a historically unpopular president and a deeply polarizing force in the United States. His drives to crack down on immigration in the name of national security and the economy cut right to the question of who is an American. And his defense on Tuesday of Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, the former Alabama judge accused by six women of pursuing romantic relationships with them when they were teenagers and he was in his 30s, comes amid a wider deluge of sexual misconduct scandals. Those engulfed include an array of politicians and policymakers — past, present, aspiring and presidential — of all partisan stripes.For any mention of Moore, who denies the accusations against him, there's Democratic Sen. Al Franken of Minnesota, who has apologized or said he feels bad about the allegations against him. For every mention of the 'Access Hollywood' tape in which Trump could be heard bragging about touching women without their consent, there are allegations that Democratic President Bill Clinton assaulted women. Both men deny the accusations.Trump won the 2016 election, even though more than a dozen women accused him of sexual misconduct, and roughly half of all voters said they were bothered by his treatment of women, according to exit polls. Trump called the allegations false and said he would sue the women, but that hasn't happened.Then there's the broader national conversation about what to do with the art, public policy work and legacies of public figures accused of sexual harassment or assault.In the past, the Emily Post Institute Inc. received Thanksgiving etiquette questions that were typically about how to handle difficult relatives, says author Daniel Post Senning.'Now, I am hearing questions like, 'I don't want to go,' or 'I can't imagine sitting at a table with someone who has this perspective and staying through the meal,'' he says. 'My impression is that it's still out there. ... The shock of that election is a little further in the rearview mirror, but I think people still have strong feelings about it.'Fort Worth, Texas, resident Greg McCulley saw that firsthand last year. He recalls that of a dozen adults gathered around the Thanksgiving table, all but one was celebrating Trump's election. That was his sister-in-law, who fumed about Trump and the 'Access Hollywood' tape. Tension seethed.'It was like, you say Donald Trump was bad, then someone says Bill Clinton was bad, so that extended to Hillary Clinton,' says McCulley, 43, an Air Force retiree who voted for Trump but doesn't dispute that Trump's recorded remarks were troubling. He does expect politics to come up this year, probably about sexual assault.'The conservatives have more of a bigger bone. They'll say look at Al Franken,' says McCully, who nonetheless looks forward to the conversation. 'But it may be that my sister-in-law keeps her mouth zipped and says, 'I don't want to wade into those waters again like last year.''The AP-NORC poll of 1,070 adults was conducted Nov. 15-19 using a sample drawn from NORC's probability-based AmeriSpeak panel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. population. The margin of sampling error for all respondents is plus or minus 4.2 percentage points.Respondents were first selected randomly using address-based sampling methods and later interviewed online or by phone.___Follow Kellman and Swanson on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/APLaurieKellman and http://www.twitter.com/EL_Swan___Online:AP-NORC Center: http://www.apnorc.org
  • The city of Everett, Washington, is looking to crack down on the dress code of “bikini baristas,” but the baristas are not backing down. The baristas are arguing that their skimpy costumes fall under freedom of expression. In recent court filings, the city claimed the coffee stands have a history of prostitution, sexual assault and exploitation. One of Everett's new laws requires the workers to wear a minimum of tank tops and shorts. It specifically applies to employees at 'quick service' restaurants, which also include fast food and food trucks. >> Read more trending news The other redefined the city's lewd conduct ordinance and created a new crime of facilitating lewd conduct. Both ordinances took effect in early September. But seven bikini baristas and the owner of a chain of the coffee stands called 'Hillbilly Hotties' sued the city to block the dress code in September, saying it's vague, unlawfully targets women, and denies them the ability to communicate through their attire.  KIRO-TV asked a constitutional law attorney about that argument.  “That is not a frivolous argument. One can see that this is conduct which may not be pure speech, but nevertheless is a conduct that does enjoy constitutional protections. The question is how much constitutional protection,” said constitutional law attorney Jeffrey Needle. The Everett City Council unanimously passed the ordinances in August but halted the ban while the case is in court.  A senior U.S. district court judge heard the arguments Tuesday in a federal Seattle court.