ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
69°
Broken Clouds
H 82° L 60°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    69°
    Current Conditions
    Partly Cloudy. H NaN° L 59°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    NaN°
    Today
    Partly Cloudy. H NaN° L 59°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day Created with Sketch.
    82°
    Tomorrow
    Chance of T-storms. H 82° L 60°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

    The Latest from the NFC coaches breakfast Wednesday that concluded the NFL owners meetings (all times local): 9:40 a.m. It's reset time for the Falcons. That's the term coach Dan Quinn is using less than two months after one of the worst collapses in NFL history and certainly the worst in a Super Bowl. That blown 25-point lead in the second half and loss in overtime to New England isn't being forgotten. It isn't being harped on, either. 'Grieving is not for me,' Quinn said. 'It's for (Falcons owner) Arthur Blank and the players and the team. 'I hope you see the connection between the city and the team, those things are a lot more important to me; to not get that final piece it takes to reward the fan base, that's where my disappointment is.' Quinn reached out to Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr and Cleveland Indians manager Terry Francona to find out how they dealt with the disappointment of losing in the postseason after building 3-1 leads last year. 'There are good things to learn from other sports,' Quinn said. 'If there's something I can gain from that, pass along and pay it forward, I am glad to do that.' ___ 9:30 a.m. While the New Orleans Saints remain interested in Patriots cornerback and 2015 Super Bowl hero Malcolm Butler, an offer sheet for him probably isn't coming. Saints coach Sean Payton says his team won't give up its first-round selection in next month's draft to secure Butler, a restricted free agent. 'We had a chance to visit with him,' Payton said. 'Currently, it's my understanding he hasn't signed his tender, so it was just that. We can sign him to an offer sheet, but I don't think we're going to do that and give up the 11th pick. In fact, I know we're not going to do that.' The tender is for $3.91 million and Butler can't be dealt by New England if he doesn't sign it. He can also sign an offer sheet with another team, which also would have to compensate the Patriots with a first-round choice. Butler must sign any offer sheet by April 21, giving New England eight days to match it before the draft. ___ 9:20 a.m. Arizona Cardinals coach Bruce Arians has long advocated that NFL officials be hired full time. In his first season as a member of the league's competition committee, Arians said he thinks the league is moving in the direction of hiring 17 full-time referees, one for each crew. 'There's a lot of negotiations in that process between the union and the league,' he said at the conclusion of the NFL owner meetings, 'but if we can have the head of each crew full time because of the consistency level of what's being said to the rest of the crew.' He said he now holds a 30-minute meeting just to scout the officiating crew that is going to work the upcoming game 'because they're all different.' 'Hopefully, we'll get more consistency in that area,' Arians said. He thinks the best new rule change is the centralizing of video reviews in New York. Arians said it should bring consistency in the calls. 'I think it will speed up for the fans and the coaches, not having to wait for a timeout to find out what's going on,' Arians said. 'There were times in the past where you would go to commercial break, come back and then we would get the TV feed, then we'd have to challenge. All that now should be sped up and we should not have those long breaks for the fans and the players.' Someone asked if Arians just mostly listened in his first season on the committee. Fat chance, the always outspoken coach said. 'I don't have any problem giving my opinion,' Arians said, 'especially when it comes to rules and referees.' ___ 8:45 a.m. Sean Payton looked around at the crowd of reporters and chuckled, knowing why they'd come to his table at the NFC coaches breakfast. He then shot down a report that his New Orleans Saints had interest in troubled quarterback Johnny Manziel. Payton had breakfast with Manziel during Super Bowl week, but it was only a get-acquainted meeting. Payton noted he was suspended in 2012 for his role in the Saints' bounty scandal and got to 'watch from afar' Manziel's Heisman Trophy season at Texas A&M. 'It was my first time having a chance to talk to him. I'll leave it at that,' Payton said. 'That was just what it was. I'm sure he's got a handful of things he's got to do stepwise to get himself back in position to sign with a club and play football again. It made sense to me to get to know him a little bit.' The Saints are set for the near future at quarterback with Drew Brees. He was the only QB to play for them last season. Manziel didn't play in 2016 after being released by Cleveland. He served a four-game suspension for violating the NFL's policy on substance abuse, was involved in a domestic violence incident with his former girlfriend and didn't played well with the Browns. 'His skill set is unique, he has good feet, can create,' Payton said before directly addressing the story that the Saints were considering adding Manziel to the roster: 'I think a part of the (news) report insinuated things were moving in that direction. I'll just say it's false.' ___ For more NFL coverage: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • Bless their hearts. Fans in Boston have a picture of gentile, sulking Atlantans cowering under their covers today. Today. Why? It’s March 28. 3-28. The score of Super Bowl LI when the Patriots began their second-half comeback to defeat Atlanta in overtime in Houston. Matt Ryan said #RiseUp and move on. So carry on, Atlanta.
  • Patriots Chairman and CEO Robert Kraft shared a part of his recent conversation with Tom Brady Monday during the owner's meetings in Phoenix.  >> Read more trending news 'As recently as two, three days ago, he assured me he'd be willing to play six, seven more years at the level he performed,' said Kraft. 'There's no one that would be happier than I, and our fan base... There's one player at the age of 40 who had one good year (Brett Favre) for the Vikings but he didn't do so well before.  'I think Tommy's sustained excellence is just unbelievable and it's a lifestyle. You know, he's in training now. It's not like he's stopped. He works out. I remember after our first Super Bowl in '01, going down in the training room in the old Foxboro Stadium, three days after we won and he's in there with the music blaring working out, so he's really dedicated and the thing that's amazing about him is to this day, he hasn't changed as a human being in terms of how he relates to people but also how he works out, and the only thing that's probably changed is how he eats. I'm not sure avocado ice cream is right for me, but if I could look like him and perform half as well, I guess I'd do it.'  When asked about the future of Brady's backup, Jimmy Garoppolo, Kraft deferred to Bill Belichick's expertise. 'I charge him to handle all football matters,' said Kraft. 'We're privileged to have the greatest quarterback in the history of the game and it looks like he's playing pretty solid and he's off the charts in my opinion and we're lucky to have him. 'That's the most important position on the team, needless to say. I don't think anyone can say, 'You've got too much depth at that position,' and I've charged Bill to make those decisions and I'll leave that with him.'  Malcolm Butler, the center of speculation regarding a possible trade with the Saints, remains an unrestricted free agent who has the option to sign a one-year offer sheet from the Patriots.  'I hope he's with us and signs his offer sheet and plays for us,' said Kraft. 'I have a great affection for him and he actually was part of probably the greatest play in the history of our team, but there are a lot of people involved in that, on both sides.' When asked if the intention was to trade Butler, Kraft quickly said, 'No,' but also made it clear that he didn't want infringe on Butler's rights and re-stated his hope Butler returned with the Patriots in 2017. As for Commissioner Roger Goodell, and whether he's welcome at the Patriots season opener in September?  'I think I'll let you all ask him that,' said Kraft. 'Look, he's commissioner of the league. As we all know, he has the right to go wherever he wishes to go and if he wanted to come he's welcome to come. We're happy that we're celebrating our fifth banner and he can decide whether he wants to be there.' 
  • Atlanta Falcons football star Julio Jones is among investigators in what backers describe as a massive business and entertainment project planned northeast of Atlanta. Plans call for a mix of shops, offices, apartments, condos and a 25-story hotel building near the Mall of Georgia, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported (http://bit.ly/2mYMM74). The hotel would be the tallest building in Gwinnett County, and include seven floors of condos and a rooftop bar, the newspaper reported. Also included: A 50,000-square-foot family entertainment center that will include 'luxury bowling,' a sports theater, arcade, private event space, restaurant and 'multi-faceted entertainment options.' Plans for the $200 million development were unveiled at a news conference this week in Atlanta. The development's name — Ariston — is Greek for 'the best.' 'We want this to be the best,' Jones said at a recent news conference at the Georgia State Capitol. 'The very best.' Jones has been described as a 'principal investor' in the project. Jon Guven of Guven's Fine Jewelry is also an investor. 'It started off as we wanted to do a family entertainment center up there just to have something to do,' said Jones, who lives in Gwinnett County. 'Because I know being on the team, guys had to take their kids like 45 minutes to really go Downtown to really hang out, do things. We just need something up there in that area.' The project will be built in phases and construction is likely to take four years, said Jonathan Garza of development firm Ivy Creek Partners. Officials hope to break ground on the first phase sometime in the next month or so. The area is about 30 miles northeast of Atlanta.
  • Atlanta Falcons' wide receiver Julio Jones is pushing a project he says will add hundreds of jobs in Gwinnett County.Jones spoke to lawmakers Wednesday at the state capitol.The mixed-use development, near the Mall of Georgia, is expected to bring more than 300 jobs.Jones also told lawmakers the Falcons are working on bringing the city of Atlanta a Super Bowl win. TRENDING STORIES: NTSB investigators arrive at scene of deadly plane crash Newborn, toddler found stabbed to death in North Carolina Company will pay you $10K a month to travel, stay in luxury homes 'We're working on getting the chemistry back as a team and get the ball rolling, and it starts in April,' Jones said.Governor Deal also tweeted a picture with Jones, who gave him a signed jersey. Great to meet @juliojones_11 this morning. Best receiver in the NFL & a gentleman off the field. #RiseUp pic.twitter.com/Nfq065iMyg-- Governor Nathan Deal (@GovernorDeal) March 22, 2017
  • The Jacksonville Jaguars have signed defensive end Malliciah Goodman. Goodman has appeared in 37 career games with 11 starts, getting 29 tackles, two forced fumbles and two fumble recoveries. Goodman was originally selected by Atlanta in the fourth round of the 2013 NFL draft. He spent his first three seasons (2013-15) with the Falcons. He appeared in one game for Seattle last season before returning to Atlanta and playing in two games for the Falcons. Goodman is expected to back up newly signed veteran free agent Calais Campbell. Goodman replaces veteran Tyson Alualu, a 2010 first-round draft pick who signed with Pittsburgh. ___ For more NFL coverage: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • Channel 2's Craig Lucie went to Arthur Blank's office and he listened to a former Navy Seal talk about his program, Heroes and Horses. The program helps veterans who are struggling to adjust back to life in society, and as the combat veteran who started it explains, it's all about them finding their purpose in life. 'At Heroes and Horses, we don't believe the veteran is sick, diseased or broken. We believe they've had experiences in life that actually give them an opportunity to grow and learn above themselves and move forward in life,' sad Micah Fink. Micah Fink is the CEO of Heroes and Horses. He spent 10 years with Navy SEAL teams, both active duty and reserves, and earned the Bronze Star. 'There's no program in the U.S. that is as challenging and as long as Heroes and Horses. There are not programs producing the types of results that we are getting,' said Fink. TRENDING STORIES: Family of 5 killed in crash after Georgia visit Man accused of holding women captive in mansion has some charges dismissed GALLERY: Amazing cars on display at the Atlanta International Auto Show Fink's life goals include helping our combat veterans find out who they truly are after experiencing what many of us cannot imagine. In order for them to do that, Blank has donated his Mountain Sky Ranch in Montana for veterans to become disconnected in the remote wilderness. 'They focus on identifying their own individual greatness and achieve that by looking to themselves for answers and not looking out for answers. I think the wilderness and horses shift that focus from out to in,' said Fink. For the qualified veterans, there is no charge for what Fink calls the three phase re-integration into society for combat veterans. While Lucie was in the Arthur Blank family offices with the Falcons owner and Coach Dan Quinn looking on, many were motivated by the Navy Seal hero helping our heroes. 'If you allow life to happen to you, it puts you in a position where you become victimized by the experiences, but if you realize that life is happening for you, it gives you a choice about what those experiences can be,' said Fink. At the speaker series this week, Blank's team announced that they are giving Heroes and Horses a $60,000 Challenge Grant, which means they need to raise another $60,000 to use it. If you want to learn more and help, CLICK HERE.
  • Channel 2's Craig Lucie went to Arthur Blank's office and he listened to a former Navy Seal talk about his program, Heroes and Horses.The program helps veterans who are struggling to adjust back to life in society, and as the combat veteran who started it explains, it's all about them finding their purpose in life.'At Heroes and Horses, we don't believe the veteran is sick, diseased or broken. We believe they've had experiences in life that actually give them an opportunity to grow and learn above themselves and move forward in life,' sad Micah Fink.Micah Fink is the CEO of Heroes and Horses.He spent 10 years with Navy SEAL teams, both active duty and reserves, and earned the Bronze Star.'There's no program in the U.S. that is as challenging and as long as Heroes and Horses. There are not programs producing the types of results that we are getting,' said Fink. TRENDING STORIES: Family of 5 killed in crash after Georgia visit Man accused of holding women captive in mansion has some charges dismissed GALLERY: Amazing cars on display at the Atlanta International Auto Show Fink's life goals include helping our combat veterans find out who they truly are after experiencing what many of us cannot imagine.In order for them to do that, Blank has donated his Mountain Sky Ranch in Montana for veterans to become disconnected in the remote wilderness.'They focus on identifying their own individual greatness and achieve that by looking to themselves for answers and not looking out for answers. I think the wilderness and horses shift that focus from out to in,' said Fink.For the qualified veterans, there is no charge for what Fink calls the three phase re-integration into society for combat veterans.While Lucie was in the Arthur Blank family offices with the Falcons owner and Coach Dan Quinn looking on, many were all motivated by the Navy Seal hero helping our heroes.'If you allow life to happen to you, it puts you in a position where you become victimized by the experiences, but if you realize that life is happening for you, it gives you a choice about what those experiences can be,' said Fink.At the speaker series this week, Blank's team announced that they here giving Heroes and Horses a $60,000 Challenge Grant, which means they need to raise another $60,000 to use it.If you want to learn more and help, CLICK HERE.
  • Tom Brady's stolen Super Bowl jerseys are back with the New England Patriots. The jerseys worn by Brady during this year's Super Bowl and the 2015 Super Bowl were returned to Gillette Stadium Thursday, the FBI announced. Brady's 2017 jersey went missing from the Patriots' locker room after the team's win over the Atlanta Falcons on Feb. 5, touching off an investigation stretching from Boston to the Mexican border. Mexican authorities searched the property of Mexican media executive Martin Mauricio Ortega, where they found the jersey, along with a Brady jersey that disappeared after the 2015 Super Bowl. A Denver Broncos helmet also was found. Ortega has not been charged in the case and has not commented. An FBI spokeswoman declined to comment on the investigation. In a statement Thursday, Patriots owner Robert Kraft said he looks forward to giving the jerseys to Brady when he returns to New England. Kraft thanked the FBI, Mexican authorities and other law enforcement agencies involved in the investigation. 'It is another example of the importance of teamwork and what can be accomplished when everyone works together,' Kraft said. The FBI released a photo of the jerseys being held by Harold Shaw, special agent in charge of the FBI Boston Division, and Col. Richard McKeon of the Massachusetts State Place. Kraft is standing between the two jerseys and behind the Patriots' five Super Bowl trophies. 'We know how much this means to the Patriots and football fans everywhere, and we are honored to be able to bring these jerseys back to Foxboro,' Shaw said. Colleagues of Ortega said he went to this year's Super Bowl in Houston as a working journalist but spent the week collecting selfies and autographs from football players. Ortega quit his job as director of the tabloid La Prensa earlier on March 14, two days after Brady's jerseys were found. ___ For more NFL coverage: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • NFL owners will consider proposals next week to cut regular-season overtime from 15 minutes to 10; eliminate players leaping over the line on kick plays; and expansion of coaches' challenges and what can be reviewed by officials. In what promises to be a busy annual meeting next week in Phoenix that will include discussing the Raiders' potential relocation from Oakland to Las Vegas, the 32 owners also will vote on changing the mechanics on replay reviews and other items intended to reduce downtime during games. The Eagles proposed four rules changes, including abolishing the leaping techniques that league football operations director Troy Vincent said Thursday 'don't belong in the game.' Seattle and Buffalo co-authored a proposal allowing a coach to challenge any officiating decision, whether a foul is called or not. 'That is a significant change to our current replay rule and it is something that will be on the floor and will be debated next week,' NFL officiating chief Dean Blandino said. Another major change would be the reduction of overtime in-season; the extra period in the playoffs would remain at 15 minutes. The powerful competition committee, of which Vincent and Blandino are members, believed it's a player safety issue, noting that number of snaps for games going to OT — especially deep into the overtime — is excessive. Especially if a team has a quick turnaround. 'We don't know where a team is going to be playing the next week, it could be four days later,' said committee chairman Rich McKay, president of the Atlanta Falcons. 'We felt we should put an end to it. We don't think it will lead to more ties. Could it? It could, but we are not concerned with that.' As for changing the format of overtime to ensure both teams always get a possession — a popular topic after how the Super Bowl ended — Blandino said the league's wants to keep the element of sudden death in the extra period. The 'leaper rule' has taken some priority among competition committee members, the players' union and coaches. Vincent said coaches have begun scheming how to defense it, which can 'create a real safety issue.' 'It is really in the best interest of the game' to outlaw leaping on kicks,' Vincent added. McKay noted that the NCAA is in the process of passing a similar ban on the technique. During the meetings that run from Sunday to Wednesday, the teams will be shown plays the competition committee believes should result in suspensions or ejections. Game officials already have had the leeway to eject players, but it rarely has happened; there were three in 2016. 'They don't happen very often, let's give the players credit,' McKay said. 'We have 40,000 plays in a year. We'll show a tape that will have four or five plays that would warrant suspension. This is not a widespread situation.' Added Vincent, a former NFL defensive back: 'When you see the plays, they are catastrophic. We had two players who did not return for the season. They are high-impact plays that belong out of the game. It will be a real point of emphasis this season.' Also proposed: —As Commissioner Roger Goodell outlined Wednesday, owners will consider having all replay decisions made by the officiating staff at league headquarters in New York, in consultation with the game's referee. The ref would no longer go 'under the hood' to view replay, instead being provided a Microsoft tablet on the sideline to look at the play. It will take at least 24 yes votes to pass. 'We feel since we've gone to a centralized model, we are getting more and more consistency, and we think this system advances that, with the idea the referee is involved in the decision,' McKay said. —Definitions of a defenseless player will be extended to a receiver running a route, whether he is looking back for the ball or not, if he is hit in the neck or head area. That will be true even within the legal 5-yard chuck zone at the line of scrimmage. —A 40-second play clock will be in use for extra points if TV coverage has not gone to a break. Halftime length will become more standardized at 13 minutes, 30 seconds from the end of the first half to the kickoff for the second half. —Referees will be allowed to make replay announcements during TV breaks and not wait for the network to return to its coverage, something Blandino said will 'improve in-game experience and reduce some of the overall replay delays. ___ For more NFL coverage: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_NFL

News

  • Pickens County deputies are searching for an armed fugitive.  Authorities are looking for Nicholas Bishop in the area of Priest Circle in Talking Rock.  Bishop is believed to be armed with a handgun and on foot after he abandoned a stolen vehicle around 2 p.m.  If you see him, call 911 immediately. Officials say do not attempt to approach him. - Please return for updates.
  • One more time, Doris Payne, the 86-year-old infamous international jewel thief, has pleaded guilty to the usual crime. She admitted Wednesday to stealing a necklace from Von Maur at Perimeter Mall last year, the DeKalb County District Attorney’s Office said. Payne, who recently said she’s been dealing with a possibly cancerous tumor, was sentenced to 120 days of house arrest and three years of probation.  She was also banned from all Von Maur locations and every mall in DeKalb County. Payne, who’d been free on bond, was arrested last month for missing a court date. Shortly after the would-be appearance, she told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution she wasn’t medically able to attend. “I ain’t runnin’,” she said in a phone interview. “I’ve never in my life been late for court. Last month, Payne was deemed too ill to stand trial by the judge presiding over a Fulton County case stemming from a missing set of earrings at Phipps Plaza. Payne has been open about her habits of theft, which she detailed in a documentary called, “The Life and Crimes of Doris Payne.” RELATED: Huge DeKalb center with (at least) 8 popular chains is opening soon RELATED: Cop helps elderly woman who got kicked out of dentist office in DeKalb RELATED: A DeKalb family’s tale of two dead bodies and a crying baby girl Like DeKalb County News Now on Facebook | Follow on Twitter and Instagram
  • A drunken driver destroyed a row of headstones at a historic Carrollton cemetery, causing tens of thousands of dollars' worth of damage, police said. According to police, the driver was coming down Martin Luther King Street on March 19, ran a stop sign, jumped a curb and crashed into the city-owned cemetery. The broken headstones range in date from the late 1800s to 1950. 'And what we discussed is, if one is damaged beyond repair, we'll put something back that's respectful. It's hard to replace it with the exact same item. The families aren't around anymore, so the city will take on the responsibility,' city manager Tim Grizzard said. TRENDING STORIES: Thousands of Georgians could lose food stamps next week 16-year-old in custody after hoax call about school gunman Food prices at SunTrust Park vs. Mercedes-Benz Stadium: What's the difference? The 35-year-old driver, Ray Antonio Baker, was arrested and charged with DUI. City officials said they will ask his insurance carrier to pay for the damage. 'Our plan is to go after the individual's insurance to pay for repairs. If that doesn't pay for everything, the city will certainly pick up the tab,' Grizzard said. Officials said this isn't the first time a driver has damaged headstones, but it's not a big enough problem to put up a wall. 'It's not something that has happened often enough that we need to put up a barrier. If it was a recurrent spot, we would do something,' Grizzard said. City officials said it could take weeks to repair the damage.
  • A federal judge in Hawaii who temporarily blocked President Donald Trump's revised travel hours before it was set to take effect issued a longer-lasting order Wednesday. U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson held a hearing Wednesday on Hawaii's request to extend his temporary hold. Several hours later, he issued a 24-page order blocking the government from suspending new visas for travelers from six Muslim-majority countries and halting the U.S. refugee program. Hawaii Attorney General Douglas Chin argued that even though the revised ban has more neutral language, the implied intent is still there. He likened it to a neon sign flashing 'Muslim Ban,' which the government hasn't bothered to turn off. Chad Readler, a Department of Justice attorney defending Trump's executive order, told the judge via telephone that Hawaii hasn't shown how it is harmed by various provisions, including one that would suspend the nation's refugee program. Watson disagreed. Here's a look at Watson's ruling and what comes next: ___ THE PREVIOUS RULING This month, Watson prevented the federal government from suspending new visas for people from six countries and freezing the nation's refugee program. The ruling came just hours before the ban was to take effect. Watson, nominated to the bench by former President Barack Obama in 2012, agreed with Hawaii that the ban would hurt the state's tourism-dependent economy and that it discriminates based on nationality and religion. Trump called the ruling an example of 'unprecedented judicial overreach.' The next day, a judge in Maryland also blocked the six-nation travel ban but said it wasn't clear that the suspension of the refugee program was similarly motivated by religious bias. The federal government appealed the Maryland ruling to the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and sought to narrow the Hawaii ruling. ___ THE LATEST RULING Like his temporary order, Watson notes that Hawaii has shown the state's universities and tourism industry will suffer from the ban. A plaintiff in Hawaii's lawsuit, the imam of a Honolulu mosque, will be harmed if the ban is enforced, Watson said: 'These injuries have already occurred and will continue to occur if the Executive Order is implemented and enforced; the injuries are neither contingent nor speculative.' Government attorneys have tried to convince the judge not to consider comments Trump has made about the travel ban. 'The court will not crawl into a corner, pull the shutters closed, and pretend it has not seen what it has,' Watson wrote. Watson also refused to narrow his ruling to only apply to the six-nation ban, as the government requested. The ruling won't be suspended if the government appeals, Watson said. 'Enforcement of these provisions in all places, including the United States, at all United States borders and ports of entry, and in the issuance of visas is prohibited, pending further orders from this court,' he wrote. ___ WHAT'S NEXT FOR HAWAII'S LAWSUIT? Watson's ruling allows Hawaii's lawsuit challenging the ban to work its way through the courts. 'While we understand that the President may appeal, we believe the court's well-reasoned decision will be affirmed,' the Hawaii attorney general's office said in a statement. Ismail Elshikh, the imam of a Honolulu mosque who joined the lawsuit as a plaintiff, argues that he's harmed by Trump's order because it prevents his Syrian mother-in-law from visiting family in the U.S. It's not clear how Watson's ruling will affect the mother-in-law's ability to obtain a visa. The Department of Justice didn't immediately comment after Watson issued his decision. ___ DEFENDING TRUMP'S EXECUTIVE ORDER The Department of Justice opposed Hawaii's request to extend Watson's temporary order. But the department said that if the judge agrees, he should narrow the ruling to cover only the part of Trump's executive order that suspends new visas for people from Somalia, Iran, Syria, Sudan, Libya and Yemen. Other provisions of the order have little or no effect on Hawaii, including a suspension of the nation's refugee program, Department of Justice attorney Chad Readler said Wednesday. In an attempt to downplay the effect suspending the nation's refugee program would have on Hawaii, Readler said only a small amount of refugees have been resettled in Hawaii. But Watson questioned that reasoning by noting that the government said there have been 20 refugees resettled in Hawaii since 2010. Other parts of Trump's order allow the government to assess security risks, which don't concern the plaintiffs in Hawaii's lawsuit, Readler said. The revised order removes references to religion, he said. ___ CAN AN APPEALS COURT AFFECT THE HAWAII RULING? The president is asking the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to put the ruling by the judge in Maryland on hold while it considers the case. The Richmond, Virginia-based appeals court will hear arguments May 8. If the court sides with the federal government, it would not have a direct effect on the Hawaii ruling, legal experts said. The Trump administration's best bet for saving the travel ban is to have the case go before the U.S. Supreme Court, said Richard Primus, a professor of constitutional law at the University of Michigan law school. 'What a ruling in 4th Circuit in favor of the administration would do is create a split in authority between federal courts in different parts of the country,' he said. 'Cases with splits in authority are cases the U.S. Supreme Court exists to resolve.