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    The Jacksonville Jaguars have signed defensive end Malliciah Goodman. Goodman has appeared in 37 career games with 11 starts, getting 29 tackles, two forced fumbles and two fumble recoveries. Goodman was originally selected by Atlanta in the fourth round of the 2013 NFL draft. He spent his first three seasons (2013-15) with the Falcons. He appeared in one game for Seattle last season before returning to Atlanta and playing in two games for the Falcons. Goodman is expected to back up newly signed veteran free agent Calais Campbell. Goodman replaces veteran Tyson Alualu, a 2010 first-round draft pick who signed with Pittsburgh. ___ For more NFL coverage: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • Channel 2's Craig Lucie went to Arthur Blank's office and he listened to a former Navy Seal talk about his program, Heroes and Horses.The program helps veterans who are struggling to adjust back to life in society, and as the combat veteran who started it explains, it's all about them finding their purpose in life.'At Heroes and Horses, we don't believe the veteran is sick, diseased or broken. We believe they've had experiences in life that actually give them an opportunity to grow and learn above themselves and move forward in life,' sad Micah Fink.Micah Fink is the CEO of Heroes and Horses.He spent 10 years with Navy SEAL teams, both active duty and reserves, and earned the Bronze Star.'There's no program in the U.S. that is as challenging and as long as Heroes and Horses. There are not programs producing the types of results that we are getting,' said Fink. TRENDING STORIES: Family of 5 killed in crash after Georgia visit Man accused of holding women captive in mansion has some charges dismissed GALLERY: Amazing cars on display at the Atlanta International Auto Show Fink's life goals include helping our combat veterans find out who they truly are after experiencing what many of us cannot imagine.In order for them to do that, Blank has donated his Mountain Sky Ranch in Montana for veterans to become disconnected in the remote wilderness.'They focus on identifying their own individual greatness and achieve that by looking to themselves for answers and not looking out for answers. I think the wilderness and horses shift that focus from out to in,' said Fink.For the qualified veterans, there is no charge for what Fink calls the three phase re-integration into society for combat veterans.While Lucie was in the Arthur Blank family offices with the Falcons owner and Coach Dan Quinn looking on, many were all motivated by the Navy Seal hero helping our heroes.'If you allow life to happen to you, it puts you in a position where you become victimized by the experiences, but if you realize that life is happening for you, it gives you a choice about what those experiences can be,' said Fink.At the speaker series this week, Blank's team announced that they here giving Heroes and Horses a $60,000 Challenge Grant, which means they need to raise another $60,000 to use it.If you want to learn more and help, CLICK HERE.
  • Tom Brady's stolen Super Bowl jerseys are back with the New England Patriots. The jerseys worn by Brady during this year's Super Bowl and the 2015 Super Bowl were returned to Gillette Stadium Thursday, the FBI announced. Brady's 2017 jersey went missing from the Patriots' locker room after the team's win over the Atlanta Falcons on Feb. 5, touching off an investigation stretching from Boston to the Mexican border. Mexican authorities searched the property of Mexican media executive Martin Mauricio Ortega, where they found the jersey, along with a Brady jersey that disappeared after the 2015 Super Bowl. A Denver Broncos helmet also was found. Ortega has not been charged in the case and has not commented. An FBI spokeswoman declined to comment on the investigation. In a statement Thursday, Patriots owner Robert Kraft said he looks forward to giving the jerseys to Brady when he returns to New England. Kraft thanked the FBI, Mexican authorities and other law enforcement agencies involved in the investigation. 'It is another example of the importance of teamwork and what can be accomplished when everyone works together,' Kraft said. The FBI released a photo of the jerseys being held by Harold Shaw, special agent in charge of the FBI Boston Division, and Col. Richard McKeon of the Massachusetts State Place. Kraft is standing between the two jerseys and behind the Patriots' five Super Bowl trophies. 'We know how much this means to the Patriots and football fans everywhere, and we are honored to be able to bring these jerseys back to Foxboro,' Shaw said. Colleagues of Ortega said he went to this year's Super Bowl in Houston as a working journalist but spent the week collecting selfies and autographs from football players. Ortega quit his job as director of the tabloid La Prensa earlier on March 14, two days after Brady's jerseys were found. ___ For more NFL coverage: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • NFL owners will consider proposals next week to cut regular-season overtime from 15 minutes to 10; eliminate players leaping over the line on kick plays; and expansion of coaches' challenges and what can be reviewed by officials. In what promises to be a busy annual meeting next week in Phoenix that will include discussing the Raiders' potential relocation from Oakland to Las Vegas, the 32 owners also will vote on changing the mechanics on replay reviews and other items intended to reduce downtime during games. The Eagles proposed four rules changes, including abolishing the leaping techniques that league football operations director Troy Vincent said Thursday 'don't belong in the game.' Seattle and Buffalo co-authored a proposal allowing a coach to challenge any officiating decision, whether a foul is called or not. 'That is a significant change to our current replay rule and it is something that will be on the floor and will be debated next week,' NFL officiating chief Dean Blandino said. Another major change would be the reduction of overtime in-season; the extra period in the playoffs would remain at 15 minutes. The powerful competition committee, of which Vincent and Blandino are members, believed it's a player safety issue, noting that number of snaps for games going to OT — especially deep into the overtime — is excessive. Especially if a team has a quick turnaround. 'We don't know where a team is going to be playing the next week, it could be four days later,' said committee chairman Rich McKay, president of the Atlanta Falcons. 'We felt we should put an end to it. We don't think it will lead to more ties. Could it? It could, but we are not concerned with that.' As for changing the format of overtime to ensure both teams always get a possession — a popular topic after how the Super Bowl ended — Blandino said the league's wants to keep the element of sudden death in the extra period. The 'leaper rule' has taken some priority among competition committee members, the players' union and coaches. Vincent said coaches have begun scheming how to defense it, which can 'create a real safety issue.' 'It is really in the best interest of the game' to outlaw leaping on kicks,' Vincent added. McKay noted that the NCAA is in the process of passing a similar ban on the technique. During the meetings that run from Sunday to Wednesday, the teams will be shown plays the competition committee believes should result in suspensions or ejections. Game officials already have had the leeway to eject players, but it rarely has happened; there were three in 2016. 'They don't happen very often, let's give the players credit,' McKay said. 'We have 40,000 plays in a year. We'll show a tape that will have four or five plays that would warrant suspension. This is not a widespread situation.' Added Vincent, a former NFL defensive back: 'When you see the plays, they are catastrophic. We had two players who did not return for the season. They are high-impact plays that belong out of the game. It will be a real point of emphasis this season.' Also proposed: —As Commissioner Roger Goodell outlined Wednesday, owners will consider having all replay decisions made by the officiating staff at league headquarters in New York, in consultation with the game's referee. The ref would no longer go 'under the hood' to view replay, instead being provided a Microsoft tablet on the sideline to look at the play. It will take at least 24 yes votes to pass. 'We feel since we've gone to a centralized model, we are getting more and more consistency, and we think this system advances that, with the idea the referee is involved in the decision,' McKay said. —Definitions of a defenseless player will be extended to a receiver running a route, whether he is looking back for the ball or not, if he is hit in the neck or head area. That will be true even within the legal 5-yard chuck zone at the line of scrimmage. —A 40-second play clock will be in use for extra points if TV coverage has not gone to a break. Halftime length will become more standardized at 13 minutes, 30 seconds from the end of the first half to the kickoff for the second half. —Referees will be allowed to make replay announcements during TV breaks and not wait for the network to return to its coverage, something Blandino said will 'improve in-game experience and reduce some of the overall replay delays. ___ For more NFL coverage: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • Former Georgia wide receiver Malcolm Mitchell knows he had quite a year. Mitchell was drafted by the New England Patriots in the fourth-round of the 2016 NFL Draft and spent his first season earning 401 receiving yards, four touchdowns and a Super Bowl ring. How the Falcons lost the Super Bowl Mitchell told ESPN on Monday that he still watches the film of his team winning the Super Bowl over the Atlanta Falcons. In fact, he’s watched it “three or four times” Mitchell tells ESPN. The most impressive part of the game for Mitchell is recognizing that the Patriots’ motivation never wavered as they rallied from a 19-point deficit in the fourth-quarter for a 34-28 overtime victory over Atlanta. “Watching the SoundFX and how encouraged and motivated everybody was,” ESPN reported Mitchell said during one of his reading rallies. “I can say it, but I wasn't standing over there with the defense. I know the offensive side was motivated. Just to (watch it again) to see how motivated the entire team was, it kind of exemplifies how well we worked together that day.” In his four seasons as a Bulldog, Mitchell racked up 2,350 receiving yards and 16 touchdowns. Suggested video: Five Unforgettable Super Bowl Controversies
  • John Beilein conjured up the highlight-reel catch that Patriots receiver Julian Edelman made during New England's game-tying drive in the Super Bowl, and said the Wolverines should keep that sort of play — an outlier, as he called it — in mind. 'The point with the Super Bowl catch was that Edelman, he willed that catch,' Beilein said Wednesday. 'We have to will stuff to happen. You have to work hard. I really stressed the outlier things, too.' Michigan's road from the bubble to the Sweet 16 continues Thursday night with a game against third-seeded Oregon. Since the Super Bowl, the Wolverines are 12-2, including a sweep through the Big Ten tournament that secured their spot in the NCAAs. Derrick Walton Jr., has averaged nearly 20 points a game and the Wolverines have shot better than 50 percent from the floor. The key to the turnaround? 'When you have great kids to work with, they'll believe and you they trust you,' the coach said. Other things to watch for in Thursday's Sweet 16 games: PLAYERS OF THE YEAR: They both could be holding Player of the Year trophies at the end of the year. And yet, when the NBA draft rolls around, they will likely wait a long time to hear their names called. Purdue vs. Kansas features a matchup of two of the season's best players: Caleb Swanigan of the Boilermakers and Frank Mason III of the Jayhawks. Most of the current mock drafts have Swanigan going in the lower part of the first round and Mason teetering somewhere between the first and second rounds. It's the latest in a long string of evidence showing that the best college players don't necessarily look like the best pro prospects. Purdue coach Matt Painter calls Swanigan, a 6-foot-9 forward, a 'poster child for today's player in terms of going to the draft, listening to what NBA people do and then improving on the things that NBA people told him he needs to improve on.' Painter said Swanigan's improvement in shooting, fitness and rebounding have improved his stock. Mason is averaging nearly 21 points as a senior this year. His main drawback is size. He's only 5-11. Still, coach Bill Self called Mason, who had academic issues coming out of high school, 'the steal of that draft class nationally.' YOU LOOK FAMILIAR: One reason Xavier is a regular at the NCAA Tournament and, for that matter, in the Sweet 16: Arizona coach Sean Miller. Miller coached the Musketeers for five seasons before he left in 2009 for Arizona. This is the second Sweet-16 meeting in three years between the teams. 'I wish it was different, but it isn't,' said Miller, who took Xavier to the Sweet 16 his last two seasons at the Cincinnati school. 'And now that I've said that, the focus clearly is on both teams, the players, the great players on both teams and I think both programs vying to stay alive and trying to advance.' Xavier coach Chris Mack was Miller's assistant back in the day. He's led the team to the second weekend four times in the last eight years. More often than not, the Musketeers have been portrayed as an underdog. They're an 11 seed this year. Mack: 'You're only an underdog if you feel like you're the lesser team. And I don't feel that way about our guys and I don't think they feel that way about each other.' ANOTHER COMEBACK: Gonzaga's 7-1 center, Przemek Karnowski, had a less-than-dominating first weekend of the tournament but the Bulldogs won anyway. All in all, a much better situation than last season. Karnowski missed most of last season after back surgery, and during much of that time, resuming day-to-day functions were more a priority than returning to the court. 'Initially it was just, we've got to help this kid somehow just get back to normal activity, a normal life where he can get up out of bed,' coach Mark Few said. 'And it was a struggle to fit a 7-foot, 300-plus-pound guy into a car and get from point A to point B.' Karnowski, who had nine and 10 points in Gonzaga's wins over South Dakota State and Northwestern last week, said the long road back from his injury deepened his appreciation for hoops. The Bulldogs play fourth-seeded West Virginia on Thursday. He said he had trouble 'just walking, preparing my own food, getting out of bed stuff like that. So it was tough for me because I always been kind of close to sports. 'It was sad for me, but at the same time I had a great support system, with my coaches, my parents,' he said. 'All my teammates, they were there for me whenever I needed them. And it was huge for me just to be there and in that position. My position wasn't the best, but they were always there for me.
  • Now that authorities believe they have recovered the jersey stolen from Tom Brady's locker following the Patriots' Super Bowl win last month, the next step will be determining whether it is in fact the MVP quarterback's missing grass-stained garment. So how exactly does that happen? Old-fashioned detective work. Experts in the sports memorabilia industry, including one that has worked directly with NFL teams, say it is a tedious process that involves comparing photos and videos that captured degradation to the jersey during the game. They also compare the jersey to team-issued serial numbers and other player-specific customizations that authentic jerseys typically have. 'Every jersey is like a fingerprint. No two jerseys are alike,' said Barry Meisel, president of the MeiGroup, which has authenticated game-worn sports memorabilia since 1997. 'They're hand-stitched, full of dirt, mud, helmet stains, turf skids and burns. When you look at jersey after a game it's unique.' NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy declined Wednesday to discuss the authentication process due to security reasons, writing in an email only 'there are a number of procedures we have been using.' The FBI also has not commented on the methods it is using. Brady's jersey went missing from the Patriots' locker room after their Super Bowl win over the Atlanta Falcons Feb. 5, setting off an investigation that stretched from Boston to the Mexican border. Working with U.S. investigators, Mexican authorities obtained a warrant to search property of Martin Mauricio Ortega, a tabloid journalist who colleagues say went to the game with a media credential, but bragged he was there as a fan. Authorities recovered the jersey, along with another Brady jersey that disappeared after the 2015 Super Bowl. A helmet belonging to a Denver Broncos player — possibly Von Miller — was also discovered. Ortega quit his job two days after the search, but has not been charged in the case and has not been located for comment. MeiGroup has authenticated jerseys for the NBA, NHL, USA Hockey and the NFL's Redskins and Chargers. Most of the authentication Meisel's company is asked to perform involves a jersey coming from the hands of league official from a player in the locker room. But he said even in those cases, a process called photo matching is used. In photo matching, an authenticator would utilize all the available photos and videos that captured images of the garment and compare stains, tears, and abrasions the garment undergoes over the course of a game. His company was once asked by a collector to authenticate a jersey that an auction house was purporting to have been worn by Boston Bruins great Bobby Orr the night the Bruins captured the 1972 Stanley Cup. Photos of him drinking from the Cup in the locker room after the game were used to prove it was real, based on comparisons of repair marks and stitching on the jersey. In today's digital age, that process is a lot easier and more dependable. 'In the Brady jerseys case, you literally have millions of visuals for the Super Bowl,' Meisel said. There are also both league- and team-specific qualities that distinguish NFL game-worn gear. Meisel said he has never worked with the Patriots, but said teams he has worked with employ unique serial numbers that are placed on different parts of their uniforms. Troy Kinunen, president of Memorabilia Evaluation and Research Services, said his company evaluated Babe Ruth's 1932 'called shot' jersey for a private collector. Authenticators used photos of old jerseys Ruth had worn to prove it was the real thing. Kinunen said customizations set the jerseys apart from one a fan would buy at a store. His company maintains archives of those customizations. Many NFL quarterbacks have their jerseys shortened or elasticized for comfort. And for the new Nike-made NFL jerseys, there is also a specific manner in which the lettering is sewn into the jersey, Kinunen said. 'The mesh holes create a pattern.you can examine application of how it's sewn on in conjunction with mesh holes,' he said. Major League Baseball has taken safeguarding game-used materials to an even higher level since beginning its authentication program with Authenticators, Inc. in 2001. The group works with active and former law enforcement personnel to personally authenticate items on the spot. Those officials, who must pass background checks, on average have more than 25 years experience. For MLB jerseys, an authenticator is stationed in the clubhouse and witnesses an item going from the player and into the laundry basket. Once an item has been authenticated, it is affixed with a hologram and unique serial number that is searchable in the league's database located on MLB.com. Kinunen said he expects the Brady incident to bring even more awareness to the authentication industry. 'It's a crazy story,' he said. 'If I had to guess jerseys have been stolen out of locker rooms for 100 years. But the value wasn't there. Now it was a nationwide manhunt because of the value associated with it.' ___ Associated Press journalists Juan Lozano in Houston and Howie Rumberg in New York contributed to this report. ___ For more NFL coverage: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_NFL ___ Follow Kyle Hightower on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/khightower
  • For all those NFL fans longing for more action, fewer interruptions and a better flow to games, Commissioner Roger Goodell is with you. The NFL is making plans to speed up the pace of games, including changing how video replays are handled and using a time clock for extra points. The league also is discussing with the TV networks how to make commercial breaks less intrusive. 'I watch a lot of football as a fan and as commissioner,' Goodell told The Associated Press on Wednesday after sending a letter to fans outlining the proposals. 'I see when I am watching on TV or at a stadium that there are opportunities to make the game more compelling from a fan standpoint.' For officiating replays, the referee no longer would go under a hood to watch a play. Instead, a tablet would be brought to him on the field and he would consult with league headquarters in New York. The final call would be made in New York. Support by 75 percent of the 32 team owners would be needed at next week's annual meetings for passage of the proposals. In addition to a time clock for PATs when there is no TV break, the league is considering instituting a play clock after a touchdown. Also, to improve the flow of games on the field and for television audiences, commercial breaks during the quarters would be reduced from 21 per game to 16 (four per period), although each would last 30 seconds longer. There also is a break at the end of the first quarter and another at the end of the third. Teams also would not be allowed to make a challenge late in a commercial break, meaning no more scenes of a referee telling the TV audience when it returns that a video review will now take place — and then the network goes to another commercial. If a team decides to challenge a call at that time, the review would be done during the commercials. The most significant change might be centralizing officiating decisions on replays, a system that has worked well for the NHL. NFL officiating director Dean Blandino and his New York staff have been involved in the process for years, but the referee has always been the final arbiter on such calls. 'We did centralized replay with our office involved for two seasons,' Goodell said, 'and this is one step further where we're going to allow the New York office to make the final determination. We think this is very smart. We still provide for the referee's input, but instead of going under the hood, he'll use the tablet to see the play, and speak to Dean and have their voice. We want the referee involved when we look at replays.' Other proposals, all with the pace of games in mind, would ensure that the clock is restarted at the proper time after a ball carrier goes out of bounds, and would standardize the length of halftimes. Regular-season halftimes are supposed to last 12 minutes, but referees have used their discretion in that area. A 5-yard delay-of-game penalty would ensue for the offending team. The number of commercial breaks would be reduced to four per quarter, and they would each last 2 minutes, 20 seconds rather than the previous 1:50. Goodell doesn't see those extra 30 seconds as intrusive, something league surveys back up. Those studies showed fans preferred fewer commercial interruptions over the course of a game. 'In most cases, fans won't know the breaks are longer,' he said, adding with a chuckle, 'Obviously, there's a break point there; these won't be 10 minutes in time.' After a score, networks often go to commercials, then do so again following the kickoff. The league found that the case after 27 percent of scores last season. 'I find it unattractive when we see doubling-up on commercials,' Goodell said. What won't be touched are the natural breaks that are part of the game and that build drama. 'We're addressing interruptions and just trying to move things along,' Goodell added. The owners begin their meetings Sunday in Phoenix. ___ For more NFL coverage: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • The Atlanta Falcons have signed fullbacks Derrick Coleman and Soma Vainuku to fill the void left by the loss of Patrick DiMarco in free agency. Also Tuesday, the Falcons announced the signing of guard Hugh Thornton, who could take over for Chris Chester on the offensive line. The 34-year-old Chester has yet to re-sign and may retire. DiMarco signed a four-year contract with Buffalo, leaving a void in the backfield. Coleman and Vainuku will compete for the starting job in training camp. Coleman, who is deaf, played in 31 games with seven starts for the Seattle Seahawks. Vainuku was signed by the Houston Texans last season after going undrafted out of college. Thornton was a third-round pick of the Indianapolis Colts in 2013. He had played in 37 games, including 32 starts, as he switched between left and right guard. ___ For more NFL coverage: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • Kirby Smart wants Georgia's 18 returning starters on offense and defense to feel the heat of competition this spring. That includes quarterback Jacob Eason. Smart opened his second spring practice as coach on Tuesday. Familiarity in Smart's system can make players more confident about their assignments, but the coach doesn't want that feeling of comfort to go too far. 'As spring goes along, a lot of guys can get complacent,' Smart said. 'You worry about guys saying 'OK, well I had my job last year so I'll have my job again this year.' That's not the way it's going to be for us. We're going to challenge them to compete every day.' As a freshman, Eason started the last 12 games as Georgia finished 8-5, a disappointing debut for Smart. Georgia's strength will be its running game led by senior tailbacks Nick Chubb and Sony Michel, who combined to run for almost 2,000 yards last season. Chubb has 3,424 yards rushing for his career, second to Herschel Walker on Georgia's all-time list. Georgia has only two scholarship players at quarterback, as Brice Ramsey will transfer for his final year of eligibility after spring semester. Smart said Ramsey agreed to serve as a student coach this spring, giving the Bulldogs an extra arm for passing drills. The coach explained that Ramsey won't actually run practice plays but will stay sharp while looking for another school to play as a graduate transfer. 'He's loyal to this program,' Smart said. 'He's been very appreciative and has handled everything in a first-class manner. We asked him to help and he said 'Absolutely, I'll come out there.'' Freshman Jake Fromm of Houston County High School in Warner Robins, Georgia, will compete with Eason. Georgia's only other quarterback is walk-on Sam Vaughn. Smart said there are 'some really good preferred-type walk-on guys coming in in the fall' to help at quarterback, but the position must be bolstered in the 2018 signing class. Smart insists Fromm, who enrolled early for spring drills, is legitimate competition for Eason. 'He has a really good understanding,' Smart said of Fromm. 'He was really coached well in high school and played in a system that was complicated from a scheme standpoint and a coverage standpoint. He comes in ahead of your normal, average freshman. He's going out there with the intent of winning over that job and winning over the team. That's what we expect him to come out and compete and do.' It would be a surprise for Fromm to pass Eason on the depth chart. Eason threw for 2,430 yards and 16 touchdowns with eight interceptions as a freshman. Senior tight end Jeb Blazevich said Eason has shown growth as a leader this offseason, including in the players' voluntary workouts without coaches. 'He's always had a lot of great things to say but he's finally getting us on the same page as him, leading,' Blazevich said. '... He's not afraid to bark at guys when he needs to. It's great seeing him come out of his shell and really start to emerge as more of a vocal leader.' Eason was not made available for interviews on Tuesday. NOTES: Georgia WR Riley Ridley, arrested on misdemeanor marijuana charges earlier this month, faces internal discipline, according to Smart. 'We do not condone that behavior,' Smart said, adding he expects Ridley 'is going to learn a valuable lesson from this mistake.' ... After using a remote location for its 2016 practices due to the ongoing construction of its indoor facility, Georgia was back on its practice fields on Tuesday. Blazevich said having to take buses to practice last season 'was miserable. ... Thankfully, we're over that hurdle.' ___ More AP college football at www.collegefootball.ap.org and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25

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  • Long before his short stints in jail turned into years behind bars, Khalid Masood was known as Adrian Elms, with a reputation for drinking and an unpredictable temper. At least twice he was convicted of violent crimes, well before he stabbed a police officer to death Wednesday in London with a motion that one horrified witness described as 'playing a drum on your back with two knives.' But as he checked out of his hotel to head toward London for his deadly rampage, the manager said he was struck by his guest's friendly manner. Within hours, Masood drove his rented SUV across the crowded Westminster Bridge, leaving a trail of dead and wounded. Then he jumped out and attacked Constable Keith Palmer, an officer guarding Parliament, stabbing him to death before being shot to death by police. In all, he killed four people and left more than two dozen hospitalized. Masood, who at 52 is considerably older than most extremists who carry out bloodshed in the West, had an arrest record dating to 1983. The violence came later, first in 2000 when he slashed a man across the face in a pub parking lot in a racially charged argument after drinking four pints, according to a newspaper account. The victim, Piers Mott, was scarred for life, said his widow, Heather. Masood's last conviction was in 2003, also involving a knife attack. It's not clear when he took the name Masood, suggesting a conversion to Islam. Heather Mott said Masood appeared to come out of jail 'even worse.' She said she got chills when she learned the identity of the London attacker. 'What a pity they didn't realize he was a nutter,' she said. Police are combing through 'massive amounts of computer data' and have contacted 3,500 witnesses as they look for clues as to why the British-born man launched the deadly attack. 'Clearly that's a main line of our investigation is what led him to be radicalized: Was it through influences in our community, influences from overseas or through online propaganda? Our investigations and our arrests will help in that, but the public appeal will make a big difference if people come forward with more information,' said Britain's top counterterrorism officer, Mark Rowley. A security official who spoke Friday on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak about an ongoing investigation confirmed that Masood had spent time in Saudi Arabia but said investigators were still trying to determine how long he stayed and what he was doing. Prime Minister Theresa May said Masood was 'investigated in relation to concerns about violent extremism' years ago. But she called him 'a peripheral figure.' The Islamic State group described Masood as 'a soldier,' claiming responsibility for the attack. Rowley said police are investigating whether he 'acted totally alone inspired by terrorist propaganda, or if others have encouraged, supported or directed him.' People made arrests across the country as they investigate whether anyone else helped Masood prepare his attack. Six people were released without charge Friday night, leaving four in custody on suspicion of preparing terrorist acts. Detectives have searched 21 properties in London, Brighton, Wales, Manchester and the central English city of Birmingham in one of Britain's biggest counterterrorism operations in years. Wednesday's attack was the deadliest in Britain since suicide bombers killed 52 commuters on London's transit system on July 7, 2005. Once Masood's identity became known, police and the media began tracing his final hours. The manager of the Preston Park Hotel in the beachside city of Brighton where Masood stayed the night before the attack said he seemed unusually outgoing and mentioned details about his family, including having a sick father. 'He was normal, in fact friendly, because we spent possibly five or 10 minutes talking to him about his background and where he came from,' Sabeur Toumi told Sky News. He was 'laughing and joking, telling us stories about where he lived.' Police raided the room, searching for clues about Masood. Masood's mother lives in rural Wales, according to a website on which she sells handmade cushions and handbags. The listings on Folksy by Janet Ajao have been taken down, but in an archived version of the site, she describes living in 'rural west Wales with my husband, border collie and a few chickens.' Calls to the home in remote Trelech, Wales, went unanswered Friday. When Masood was in school, he took his stepfather's name, Ajao. He was athletic and popular in high school, known as someone who liked to party, according to Stuart Knight, a former classmate, who said the young man was one of only two black students in the school of 600. 'I am in shock — that is not sympathy for what he has done — he was a nice guy and I'm surprised he turned and did what he did,' Knight said. In one of the last places Masood lived, a home in Birmingham, neighbors recalled him as a quiet man whose wife was veiled and who wore traditional Muslim clothing. But the neighborhood is not among one of the city's many Muslim enclaves, suggesting he was not deeply embedded in its religious community. Moazzam Begg, a former Guantanamo prisoner born and raised in Birmingham, said the details emerging of the attacker's life raised questions about where was radicalized. 'He did not live in a Muslim neighborhood. In my mind, in my analysis, he was probably a drifter,' said Begg, adding that no one he knew in the community had met Masood. 'I'd also be surprised if he had any connection with a mosque, because sadly they are places where you can no longer discuss politics or air grievances.' Since British authorities began cracking down on mosques, many people are instead being radicalized online, Berg added. Cultural and religious alienation can fuel such violence, he added. Begg helps run a group called Cage that has encountered extremists who spoke of their alienation before they committed attacks. While in prison, Begg said he saw others who succumbed to radicalism. He said groups like IS can exploit people's weaknesses and criminality. Late Friday, the British government honored a lawmaker who battled to save the life of the police officer slain in the Parliament attack, giving him mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. May's office said Tobias Ellwood has been named to the Privy Council, a committee of senior lawmakers, judges and others that advises Queen Elizabeth II. The institution dates back a millennium. Security Minister Ben Wallace, who helped coordinate the government response to Wednesday's attack, was also named to the council. ___ Hinnant reported from London, where Associated Press writers Danica Kirka, Jill Lawless and Gregory Katz contributed.
  • A Cherokee County middle school teacher died Thursday morning after his pickup truck went off a 100-foot embankment on I-575, officials said. The driver of the F-150 was identified as Kevin White, 37, of Canton. He was a chorus teacher at Booth Middle School in Woodstock. The incident happened on the southbound side of the interstate at Little River Bridge near Ridgewalk Parkway in Woodstock. The truck was found upside down. “It’s a significant drop,” Cherokee County sheriff’s Lt. Jay Baker told Channel 2 Action News. “It appears they were traveling at a pretty high rate of speed (considering) the distance where the car went airborne.” Baker said the truck veered into the median and went through a construction zone before striking a gravel embankment that caused it to become airborne. The accident caused major delays during the morning commute. The Cherokee sheriff’s office and Woodstock police are investigating. In other news:
  • U.S. stocks flirted with sharp losses but managed a mixed finish after Republicans canceled a vote on their health care bill because it became clear the bill would fail. Hospital stocks soared in response, while companies that stand to benefit from other Trump proposals faltered. For the second day in a row, stocks started higher and wilted as it became clear the health care bill was in trouble. The Dow Jones industrial average plunged as much as 126 points in afternoon trading on reports of the bill's impending failure, although Wall Street cut its losses after the vote was canceled. Consumer-focused companies like Nike, Starbucks and clothing company PVH rose. The health care act became something of a proxy for the rest of the Trump agenda and it dominated the market for most of this week. It was the worst week for stocks since the week before the presidential election. Banks and small-company stocks, which made huge gains after Trump was elected, both suffered their biggest losses in more than a year. President Trump and other Republican leaders said they were moving on from health care, and Michael Scanlon, a portfolio manager for Manulife Asset Management, said investors will be glad if that happens. 'You're going to see a very quick pivot to corporate tax reform,' he said. A corporate tax cut could give stocks a large boost by increasing profits, and it might also raise tax revenue. After the close of trading, House Speaker Paul Ryan said Republicans will proceed with tax reform proposals, but acknowledged the health care debacle will make that task more difficult. The Standard & Poor's 500 index finished down 1.98 points, or 0.1 percent, at 2,343.98. The Dow lost 59.86 points, or 0.3 percent, to 20,596.72 as Goldman Sachs and Boeing sank. Technology companies inched higher and the Nasdaq composite rose 11.04 points, or 0.2 percent, to 5,828.74. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks added 1.22 points, or 0.1 percent, to 1,354.64. Trading was relatively light as investors waited for answers about the state of President Donald Trump's business-friendly agenda. That may have contributed to the big fluctuations. Hospitals and insurers that do a lot of business with Medicaid celebrated the demise of the bill. HCA Holdings, the largest U.S. hospital company, climbed $2.87, or 3.5 percent, to $86.04 and Community Health Systems jumped 84 cents, or 9.7 percent, to $9.54. Among Medicaid-focused companies, Centene and Molina Healthcare each gained about 5 percent. The American Health Care Act would likely have left more Americans uninsured and would make big changes to Medicaid, a joint federal-state health program for low-income Americans. Those stocks fell when the bill was introduced because investors were concerned hospitals would have to take in more patients who lack insurance and that insurers would get less money from Medicaid. Insurance companies slumped. Cigna fell $3.36, or 2.3 percent, to $142.82 and Anthem shed $2.63, or 1.6 percent, to $126.77. With Trump and majority Republicans unable to pass the first big item on their agenda, there were some signs of concern that his proposals of tax cuts, infrastructure spending, and regulatory cuts will take longer. Those are aspects of Trump's proposed agenda Wall Street is excited about. Vulcan Materials, a construction materials maker, sank $2.65, or 2.3 percent, to $112.74. Steel maker Nucor declined $1.50, or 2.4 percent, to $59.76. Construction and machinery companies also stumbled. Engine maker Cummins shed $1.45, or 1 percent, to $150.77 and Boeing sank $1.44 to $175.82. Scanlon, of Manulife, said investors want Trump and Congress to come up with a real proposal that changes corporate taxes. 'Something needs to be done with a permanent solution, not just one of these holiday things,' he said, because 'the goal is to be a stimulus for domestic investment.' Bond prices rose slightly. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.41 percent from 2.42 percent. U.S. crude oil futures rose 27 cents to $47.97 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, added 24 cents to $50.80 a barrel in London. In other energy trading, wholesale gasoline gained 2 cents to $1.60 a gallon. Heating oil rose 1 cent to $1.50 a gallon. Natural gas added 3 cents to $3.08 per 1,000 cubic feet. The dollar inched down to 110.80 yen from 111.07 yen. The euro edged up to $1.0808 from $1.0786. Gold rose $1.30 to $1,248.50 an ounce. Silver jumped 16 cents to $17.75 an ounce. Copper lost 1 cent to $2.63 a pound. In Germany, the DAX added 0.2 percent and the French CAC 40 dropped 0.2 percent and Britain's FTSE 100 index dipped 0.1 percent. Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 index rose 0.9 percent following recent losses. The Kospi of South Korea shed 0.2 percent while Hong Kong's Hang Seng reversed earlier losses to finish 0.1 percent higher. ___ AP Markets Writer Marley Jay can be reached at http://twitter.com/MarleyJayAP His work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/journalist/marley-jay
  • A judge has dismissed a large part of the case against the man accused of holding six women against their will inside a Sandy Springs mansion.Kenndric Roberts appeared before a judge Thursday and heard the extensive case against him.Channel 2's Mike Petchenik was inside the courtroom and live-tweeted the hearing as a detective went on the stand to detail the investigation.We'll have more on the new details released in the case on Channel 2 Action News starting at 4Roberts was facing 14 felony charges, including six counts of human trafficking and six counts of false imprisonment, and weapons charges.Charges that remain are:1. False Imprisonment 2. False Imprisonment 3. Weapons charge Prosecutors said Roberts held six women against their will at a mansion and forced them to dance at the Pink Pony strip club.They said he took their money, by one account, $78,000, for just two months of work. RELATED STORIES: Woman held captive was forced to dance at strip clubs, mother says Man accused of holding women captive faces 14 felony charges Man accused of holding 6 women captive in Sandy Springs mansion Investigators also said he also threatened harm to the women if they left him.'He took her phone, we found her passport in his bedroom,' said detective Justin Clutter. 'Basically she was in fear because she saw firearms. He ended up sending her to Dominican Republic to get a breast augmentation and a butt lift. And he started making threats.'Roberts attorney called him a 'poor man's Hugh Hefner,' who had legit contracts with these women to pay them for the work they were doing for him.He argued Roberts lavished them with expensive gifts as part of their payment and that they were free to leave as they wanted. Minute by minute coverage of the case: Judge also sets a bond for Kenndric Roberts. D.A. arguing victims weren't notified about potential bond.-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 Breaking: Judge dismissed all but three charges against Kenndric Roberts. pic.twitter.com/v0Op6UrYqS-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 Defense attorney argues women weren't held against their will, wanted to partake in the lavish lifestyle Kenndric Roberts was providing.-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 Prosecutor: Roberts threatened to cut the breast implants out of a victim if she tried to leave him.-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 Attorney: 'My client is a poor man's Hugh Hefner.'-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 Attorney points out Kenndric Roberts has no previous arrest record, despite allegations of gang affiliations.-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 Attorney: 'They were living pretty high off the hog, weren't they?' Det: 'That's debatable.'-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 Attorney says Roberts paid for health insurance for the woman, provided them vehicles, expensive jewelry.-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 Attorney says women had housing, personal chef, tanning contracts and beauty salon stipends while working for Roberts.-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 Defense attorney argues all the girls had contracts with a 'termination clause' in it.-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 I obtained this handwritten note Roberts' attorney says he wrote showing items he says he gave one woman who worked for him. pic.twitter.com/uFQUsoiWLw-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 Det. testifies Roberts forced the women to dance at the Pink Pony in Brookhaven, then took all their tips.-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 Det: Kenndric Roberts put vehicles in the name of one victim who had good credit.-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 Det.says one human trafficking victim wrote an e-mail to the Attorney General's office laying out allegations of abuse at the home.-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 Det. says Roberts wouldn't allow the women to keep any money on them at all.-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 Detective says Roberts stole $78k from women he forced to work at strip clubs.-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 Detective testifies Roberts sent victim to Dominican republic to have breast work and butt lift.-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 A #SandySprings special investigator is testifying in human trafficking case. pic.twitter.com/Z4GGAli63x-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017 Kenndric Roberts is in court for his prelim hearing on human trafficking charges. pic.twitter.com/w0eXros87D-- Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) March 23, 2017