STORM CENTER:

Severe weather affecting parts of metro Atlanta

ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

partly-cloudy-tstorms-day Created with Sketch.
80°
Afternoon T-storms
H 82° L 71°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day Created with Sketch.
    80°
    Current Conditions
    Afternoon T-storms. H 82° L 71°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day Created with Sketch.
    82°
    Today
    Afternoon T-storms. H 82° L 71°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day Created with Sketch.
    87°
    Tomorrow
    Partly Cloudy T-storms. H 87° L 73°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Baseball
Braves game postponed after shootings near Nationals Park
Close

Braves game postponed after shootings near Nationals Park

Braves game postponed after shootings near Nationals Park
Photo Credit: Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP
Area surrounding the Washington Navy Yard and the Washington Nationals Park in Washington is swarmed by emergency personnel following a shooting at the Navy Yard.

Braves game postponed after shootings near Nationals Park

WASHINGTON — In the aftermath of shootings that left at least 12 dead Monday morning a few blocks from Nationals Park at the Washington Navy Yard, the opener of the Braves’ highly anticipated series against the Nationals was postponed and will made up as part of a Tuesday doubleheader.

“It makes our game seem so unimportant when stuff like this happens,” Braves manager Fredi Gonzalez said after the announcement that Monday night’s game had been postponed. “It’s the right call, doing what we’re doing. You don’t want 40,000 people or so coming in here, for their safety. Who knows what’s going on? It’s the right call, and also out of respect for the people who lost their lives and their families.”

Starting times for Tuesday’s split doubleheader are 1:05 p.m. and 7:05 p.m. The Braves can clinch the National League East division title by winning two of three in the series against the second-place Nationals.

The postponement was not made official until 3:12 p.m., nearly seven hours after the shootings, less than four hours before the scheduled first pitch, and an hour or more after most players from both teams had already arrived at the ballpark.

“We got on the bus at 1:30 and we were all still wondering, why are we getting on the bus?” Braves relief pitcher Scott Downs said. “Baseball, I think, was the last thing on everybody’s mind. Once they heard the tragedy that went on and the extent, and heard there was still somebody out there, they don’t know…. I think that’s the last thing anybody wanted to do was come to the ballfield.”

Braves third baseman Chris Johnson said, “That’s way more important than baseball and clinching a division and home-field advantage and all that stuff. People lost their lives.”

While one shooter was killed, District of Columbia police said early Monday afternoon that they were still searching for two other possible gunmen in the vicinity. With that charged atmosphere awaiting, and an air of uncertainty hanging over the city, the Braves boarded a bus at the team hotel across the Potomac River at Arlington, Va., and took the short but tense trip to Nationals Park.

“There were a lot of guys that didn’t really want to play, that thought it was kind of disrespectful to play,” Johnson said. “It happened right across the street, and to be over here cheering, and they’re using a parking lot for families (of victims) and stuff like that?

“I don’t know, it should just be quiet for today. That’s kind of what we thought. And (the Nationals) had their rep come over and, I think, talk to (Braves player representative Brandon) Beachy, and they felt the same way. So they made a call to the players’ association to try to get this cancelled for today.”

Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo said, “It’s a very emotional day. An extremely horrific act happened very near to the ballpark. Our neighbors at the Navy Yard, our thoughts and prayers go out to all the victims over there and all of the people affected by this. We felt it was inappropriate to play a major league baseball game with such tragedy right down the street.”

As for the delay in postponement, he said, “There’s a lot of (logistics) that go into canceling the game for these reasons. We have to be in contact with the federal authorities, the state and D.C. authorities to have a coordinated effort and whenever you cancel a game, obviously MLB is involved and we have to go through the correct procedures with that.”

At around 10:30 a.m., Nationals manager Davey Johnson told Washington newspapers that he and Washington players had been told to stay away from the ballpark until further notice.

However, Gonzalez was permitted to enter Nationals Park when he arrived at noon, and the Braves were told shortly thereafter that their players could enter the ballpark as usual.

A machine-gun toting law-enforcement officer stopped the Braves bus near the ballpark and informed the driver that he would have to take a different route. At every corner in the vicinity, police were stationed, the lights atop their cars flashing. All afternoon and into the early evening, sirens wailed from nearby streets.

“You wouldn’t know you’re in the United States,” said Gonzalez, while standing barely a mile from the Capitol building, which is visible from the Nationals Park pressbox. “Stuff like this shouldn’t happen in the United States…. But it does. More and more.”

Several streets around the ballpark were blocked off all day as a perimeter was established around the sprawling Navy Yard complex, and a ballpark parking lot was used as a staging area for families of victims and others evacuated from the Navy Yard.

The Metro (subway) station used by fans going to Nationals Park is the Navy Yard stop. It was closed immediately after the shootings, but re-opened by mid-morning.

At 2 p.m., a group of Nationals Park food-service employees exiting the subway at the Navy Yard station cursed loudly and repeatedly about being told to come to work despite the situation unfolding only a few blocks from the ballpark.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

News

  • Polk County Sheriff Johnny Moats isn’t naming names, but the six inmates who rescued an officer during a work detail last Friday will serve reduced sentences. Many of the six men who rushed to help the officer who’d passed out in the afternoon heat haven’t even been sentenced yet, Moats told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “If I’m in court when they go, I would stand up and let them know what they did,” Moats said. MORE: 6 inmates save officer who passed out during work detail After the officer collapsed, one of the inmates grabbed the man’s work phone and called 911, according to the sheriff's office. The inmates also took off the man’s outer carrier vest in an attempt to help cool him off.  Moats said prisoners in Polk County jail already earn two days time served for every day they spend in the county jail. Those who volunteer for work detail earn three days for every one. Moats said he would give these men credit for four days for every one served.  “I can’t do that if they are sentenced to prison,” Moats said. It’s what is traditionally called “time off for good behavior” and applied to any future sentence.   In other news:
  • The Latest on Senate Republicans' health care bill (all times local): 6:15 p.m. The trade association for Catholic hospitals and nursing homes says it strongly opposes the Senate Republican health care bill, warning it would have a 'devastating impact' on the poor and frail. Sister Carol Keehan, president of the Catholic Health Association, says Congress should start over with a bipartisan approach. Keehan says, 'The small tweaks made in the newly released Senate bill do not change the fact that millions will lose their health care, especially through a complete restructuring and deep federal funding reduction to the Medicaid program.' Former President Barack Obama once credited Keehan for helping pass the Affordable Care Act, now in Republican crosshairs. Keehan publicly supported the legislation at critical points in the 2009-10 congressional debate that led to its passage. ___ 6:10 p.m. AARP is blasting the Senate Republican health care bill and calling on every senator to vote no. AARP Executive Vice President Nancy LeaMond said in a statement Thursday that the bill would hit millions of Americans with higher costs and result in less health coverage. The bill would allow insurers to charge older adults up to five times as much as younger adults. LeaMond says AARP, which represents some 38 million Americans age 50 and older, is 'adamantly opposed to the Age Tax.' AARP is also raising concerns about cuts in Medicaid, saying they will leave millions 'at risk of losing the care they need and erode seniors' ability to live in their homes and communities.' ___ 6 p.m. The top U.S. doctors group says it is still reviewing the Senate Republican health care plan, but says it strongly opposes limits on Medicaid spending. American Medical Association President Dr. David Barbe (Barb) said Thursday the group has a 'grave concern with a formula that will not cover needed care for vulnerable patients.' He says the AMA's main objectives are that people who are currently insured should not lose coverage and that safety-net programs should be adequately funded. The AMA has about a quarter-million members. The Senate GOP bill would cut and revamp Medicaid, the federal-state program that provides coverage for low-income Americans. ___ 5:20 p.m. An addiction treatment advocacy group says the Senate health care plan falls short in confronting the opioid epidemic. Joseph J. Plumeri of the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse says the proposed cuts to Medicaid mean fewer people will receive treatment for addiction. He says anyone who supports the legislation 'cannot claim to be committed to ending the opioid epidemic.' The Senate bill would create a $2 billion fund to provide grants to states in support of substance abuse treatment and recovery, and also to help care for people with mental health problems. But advocates say the current financing provided through Medicaid is far greater — and open-ended. Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, had sought $45 billion over 10 years to combat the addiction crisis. __ 4:35 p.m. U.S. Capitol Police have arrested 43 people who were protesting proposed cuts to Medicaid inside a Senate office building. In a statement, Capitol Police say the protesters 'removed themselves from their wheelchairs and lay themselves on the floor, obstructing passage through the hallway and into nearby offices.' Some of the protesters were yelling 'no cuts to Medicaid' as they were being led away by police. The protest came on the same day Senate Republican leaders released their version of a bill that would repeal and replace President Barack Obama's health law. The bill limits Medicaid spending. Capitol Police say those arrested were charged with crowding, obstructing or incommoding, which means inconveniencing or disturbing others. __ 3:55 p.m. Former President Barack Obama says the Senate's GOP-written health care bill will cause millions of families to lose health care coverage. The former president issued a statement on his Facebook page as Senate Republicans unveiled a plan to dismantle Obama's signature presidential achievement. Obama called Senate Republicans' health care bill a 'massive transfer of wealth from middle-class and poor families to the richest people in America.' He also says it 'hands enormous tax cuts to the rich and to the drug and insurance industries, paid for by cutting health care for everybody else.' The former president says amending the GOP-written bill 'cannot change the fundamental meanness at the core of this legislation.' Obama says he hopes there are 'enough Republicans in Congress who remember that public service is not about sport or notching a political win.' ___ 3:15 p.m. Medical groups are beginning to weigh in on the Senate Republican health care bill, and they have problems with the proposal. The American Academy of Pediatrics says the bill would hurt children by scaling back Medicaid. Its president, Dr. Fernando Stein, says the plan was crafted without input from pediatricians and 'would tear down' the progress the nation has made by achieving insurance coverage for 95 percent of children. America's Essential Hospitals, which represents more than 300 safety-net health facilities, says the version the Senate released Thursday 'might be worse overall' than the House legislation and might lead to hospitals reducing services or closing. The Association of American Medical Colleges says the Senate plan would leave millions of people without health coverage, and others with only bare-bones insurance plans. ___ 2:15 p.m. Four Republican senators say they are not ready to vote for the GOP health care bill, putting the measure in jeopardy. The four are Ted Cruz of Texas, Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, Mike Lee of Utah and Rand Paul of Kentucky. They say in a statement that they are open to negotiation before the full Senate considers the measure. The four say there are provisions that are an improvement to the current health care system. But they add that the measure fails to accomplish what they have promised to their constituents, 'to repeal Obamacare and lower their health care costs.' GOP leaders hope to vote on the bill next week and can only afford two defections from the 52 Senate Republicans. ___ 1:50 p.m. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky says he and three other Republican senators are preparing to announced their opposition to the Senate health care bill as it's written. Their opposition puts the bill in jeopardy, since Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell can lose only two Republican senators and still pass the legislation. Paul tells The Associated Press in an interview that the bill released Thursday resembles 'Obamacare' too closely and does not go far enough to repeal former President Barack Obama's law. Paul says that he and the other senators are 'definitely open to negotiation' but that they need to make their opposition clear in order to ensure negotiations happen. McConnell is pushing toward a vote next week but Paul's stance throws that into question. ___ 1:30 p.m. U.S. Capitol Police are arresting dozens of people who are protesting cuts to Medicaid in the Senate Republicans' health care bill. The protesters have filled a hallway in one of the Senate office buildings, outside the office of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky. Some of the protesters are being escorted individually. Others are much more reluctant to leave and it's taking four or five officers to carry them out. The protesters are yelling 'no cuts to Medicaid' as they are being led away. One protester says he's with the disability rights group ADAPT. Phillip Corona says he traveled from Wisconsin to make his voice heard. Corona says Medicaid helps his son Anthony get out of bed every morning. Phillip Corona fears that changes to the program 'would possibly mean putting him in a nursing home.' Alison Barkoff — director of advocacy for the Center for Public Representation — helped organize the protest. She says the protesters rely on Medicaid to help them live and she says the health bill amounts to 'tax cuts for the wealthy on the backs of people with disabilities.' ___ 11:35 a.m. Democrats are roundly criticizing the Republican plan to scrap the Obama health care law. Minority Leader Chuck Schumer spoke on the Senate floor Thursday moments after the GOP's 142-page discussion draft was posted online. Republicans had been briefed on the plan behind closed doors. Schumer says, 'We live in the wealthiest country on earth. Surely we can do better than what the Republican health care bill promises.' House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi assails the GOP bill as a tax break for wealthy Americans. The bill would eliminate the requirement that Americans buy insurance or face a tax penalty. ___ 11:20 a.m. President Donald Trump is expressing hope that the Senate will pass a health care plan 'with heart' following the release of a Republican plan to dismantle President Barack Obama's health law. Trump says at the start of a White House event on technology he is hopeful Congress will get something done on health care 'with heart.' The president spoke shortly after Senate Republicans released a 142-page draft of their bill to get rid of much of Obama's law. The bill faces broad opposition from Democrats. But Trump says that Republicans would love to have Democratic support. ___ 11:18 a.m. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is praising the Republican plan to scuttle the Obama's health overhaul, arguing it's the right alternative to a 'failed' law. Moments after the 142-page discussion draft was unveiled, McConnell spoke on the Senate floor, renewing his criticism of the seven-year-old law. He outlined the GOP plan that would cut Medicaid, slash taxes and waive the requirement that Americans purchase health insurance. Senate Republicans had been briefed on the plan earlier Thursday. Emerging from the session, McConnell did not answer when asked if he has the votes to pass the GOP proposal. A vote would occur next week after budget analysts assess the package. ___ 10:56 a.m. Senate Republicans have released a 142-page draft of their bill to eliminate much of the Obama health care law. The measure would cut and revamp Medicaid, the health care program for lower-income and disabled people. It would repeal tax increases Obama's law imposed on higher-income people and medical industry companies to pay for expanded coverage. And it would end the tax penalty Obama's statute imposes on people who don't buy insurance — in effect, ending the so-called individual mandate. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is hoping to push the measure through the Senate next week. But its fate remains uncertain. It faces uniform Democratic opposition. And at least a half-dozen Republicans — both conservatives and moderates — have complained about it. ___ 10:20 a.m. Senate Republicans are holding a private meeting to hear from leaders about their long-awaited plan for eliminating much of President Barack Obama's health law. Lobbyists and congressional aides say the Senate bill would cut Medicaid, end penalties for people not buying insurance and rescind tax increases that Obama imposed to help pay for his law's expansion of coverage. Republicans plan to make their plan public later Thursday. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell developed the bill behind closed doors. The measure represents his attempt to satisfy GOP moderates and conservatives who've complained about the measure. McConnell hopes to push the measure through the Senate next week. But it remains unclear whether he will have enough votes.
  • It was a rather pleasant spring and now the first summer month too has been cooler than normal. Hot weather has not lasted more than a couple or few days so far this year. It sure saves the lawn and bushes a lot of stress and saves the watering bill and the A/C bill, so I like it. But I am sure sun tanning fans are not thrilled. It still looks like from today past the 4th of July real hot weather will continue to be hard to come by. Then odds of some heat go up if the new Weekly European Model Ensemble run is right. 1-15 Day GFS Ensemble average temperature departure from normal: End of June-early July rainfall amounts GFS Ensemble and Euro Ensemble: Hope for some drying beyond the current wet spell:      European Model the week ending July 7th: Then the model suggests more upper-level ridging which would bring warmer and drier if correct. The week ending July 14th: The model projects not dry weather in Georgia but less wet to open the new month, as the bigger rains are projected to shift north of here. None-the-less, it looks like odds for rain will be above-normal right into the start of August. So no drought and no extreme heat here. Week ending July 21st: Week ending July 28th: FOLLOW me on Twitter @MellishMeterWSB
  • A Florida church was spray-painted with swastikas and the phrase “Satan was here.” Members of Christ The King Lutheran Church in Riverview, Florida, saw the vandalism Wednesday morning, according to a report from WFTS.  >> Read more trending news Along with the swastikas, the vandalism included pentagrams, upside-down crosses and racist words painted on the exterior church walls, according to WFTS.  Related: Woman smears feces on Florida church, claims leader is ‘attacking her mind’  “I don’t want them to make any more mistakes that would ruin their lives,” Pastor Kevin Yoakum told WFTS, referring to the vandals. WFLA reported Thursday that the Hillsborough County Rapid Response Team has worked to remove the graffiti with power washes, scrubbing and painting.  The vandals could face thousands of dollars in fines or jail time. The incident is currently being investigated by the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office. Kelcie Willis with the Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed  to this story.
  • The confession of a Wisconsin inmate featured in the Netflix series 'Making a Murderer' was improperly obtained and he should be retried or released from prison, a three-judge federal appeals panel ruled Thursday. Brendan Dassey was sentenced to life in prison in 2007 in photographer Teresa Halbach's death on Halloween two years earlier. Dassey told detectives he helped his uncle, Steven Avery, rape and kill Halbach in the Avery family's Manitowoc County salvage yard. Avery was sentenced to life in a separate trial. A federal magistrate judge ruled in August that investigators coerced Dassey, who was 16 years old at the time and suffered from cognitive problems, into confessing and overturned his conviction. The state Justice Department appealed the ruling to the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, a move that kept Dassey, now 27, behind bars pending the outcome. A three-judge panel from the Chicago-based 7th Circuit upheld the magistrate's decision to overturn his conviction. Wisconsin can appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, ask for a review by the full 7th Circuit or retry Dassey within 90 days. Johnny Koremenos, a spokesman for Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel, said the office expects to seek review by the full 7th Circuit or the U.S. Supreme Court, and hopes 'that today's erroneous decision will be reversed.' 'We continue to send our condolences to the Halbach family as they have to suffer through another attempt by Mr. Dassey to re-litigate his guilty verdict and sentence,' Koremenos said. Dassey's lawyers from the Center on Wrongful Convictions of Youth at Northwestern University said they're elated and will take immediate steps to secure his release. Attorney Laura Nirider said they want to send Dassey home to his mother as soon as possible. She said they did the math and determined that he had been in prison for 4,132 days as of Thursday. The center's director, Steven Drizin, said the ruling provides a model for the kind of thorough analysis that courts should always undertake in assessing whether a confession was voluntary, and highlights the importance for teenagers to have parents or trusted adults in the interrogation room. 'While these tactics might not have overwhelmed a seasoned criminal or a 30-year-old with a law degree, they clearly overwhelmed a 16-year-old, socially avoidant, intellectually limited (youth) who had never been interrogated by the police before,' he said. The appellate panel split, with Judges Ilana Rovner and Ann Williams affirming and David Hamilton in dissent. The majority opinion by Rovner said 'no reasonable court' could have any confidence that Dassey's confession was voluntary. It cited 'the leading, the fact-feeding, the false promises, the manipulation of Dassey's desire to please' as among many factors that cast it in doubt. Hamilton, in dissent, wrote: 'The majority's decision breaks new ground and poses troubling questions for police and prosecutors. It calls into question standard interrogation techniques that courts have routinely found permissible, even in cases involving juveniles.' Avery and Dassey contend they were framed by police angry with Avery for suing Manitowoc County over his wrongful conviction for sexual assault. Avery spent 18 years in prison in that case before DNA tests showed he didn't commit the crime. He's pursuing his own appeal in state court. Their cases gained national attention in 2015 after Netflix aired 'Making a Murderer,' a multi-part documentary looking at Halbach's death, the ensuing investigation and trials. The series sparked widespread conjecture about the pair's innocence and has garnered them a massive following on social media pushing for their release. Authorities who worked on the cases insisted the documentary is biased. Ken Kratz, the prosecutor, wrote in his book 'Avery' that Dassey was 'a shuffling, mumbling young man with bad skin and broken-bowl haircut' who could have saved Halbach's life but instead involved himself in her rape and murder and Avery is 'by any measure of the evidence, stone guilty.' ___ Karnowski reported from Minneapolis. Associated Press writer Gretchen Ehlke contributed from Milwaukee.
  • Actor Kevin Spacey, Jon Hamm and Jamie Foxx star in the summer’s most anticipated action movie, and it’s equal parts heart-pounding thrills and toe-tapping musical. Car crashes, romance and a musical backdrop make “Baby Driver” a genre-bending adrenaline kick from writer/director Edgar Wright. >> Read more trending news “We had a very good blueprint to work with from Edgar,” Jon Hamm told Hot Topics digital producer Jessica Sooknanan. “Not only his script and his shot-list essentially. He had the whole movie story boarded out.” The film stars Ansel Elgort, who plays a skilled getaway driver in Atlanta serving kingpin Kevin Spacey and cronies Hamm and Jamie Foxx. Wright wrote nearly every scene to the beat of a killer song. “Everything really, even to the syncopation of what he hears when we do ADR, he really wanted it to bound the right way. It was magical in that way,” said Foxx. It turns out, shooting guns on-beat is harder than it looks. “It was really hard,” said Eiza Gonzales, who plays Hamm’s love interest, Darling. “When Jamie shot, then I knew someone else was going to shoot and then I was there, but you had to have the beat.” >> Related: Ron Howard tapped to direct Han Solo stand-alone film You’re not going to want to blink in the caffeinated heist thriller, or you might miss a musical cameo. “There’s a brief appearance by Big Boi and Killer Mike, Flea from the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Sky Ferrerira, Paul Williams, Jon Spencer. To be honest, I would have done even more,” Wright said. “Baby Driver” opens in the U.S. on June 28.