Listen Live:

UK’s Sky News coverage of London terror attack

ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
51°
Broken Clouds
H 60° L 47°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    51°
    Current Conditions
    Broken Clouds. H 60° L 47°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    61°
    Today
    Partly Cloudy. H 70° L 54°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    71°
    Tomorrow
    Partly Cloudy. H 70° L 54°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Latest from Jon Lewis

    They're a group of people that have two things in common: they're all refugees and they are all new American citizens. 'These are folks that are leaving behind war and violence,' says Paddia Mixon, CDO of New American Pathways. 'They fled for their lives, and this is their opportunity to find a permanent safe place to be.' The naturalization ceremony was held at the Georgia State Capitol, following a ceremony for the refugees prior to that. In the wake of the new travel ban, it may seem and all the time to be naturalized as an American citizen. But, for these people, there was a little choice. 'For most people this is the best option they have to have a normal life,' says Mixon, 'to have the opportunity to choose their own destiny, and support their family.' Mixon says there is a lot of fear among the refugees, but also great optimism about this country. She says all are enthusiastic about becoming citizens, for money the first time they will be citizens anywhere.
  •  Atlanta-based UPS is testing a drone delivery system in Florida, but don't expect to see the skies over the metro area filled with drones anytime soon. 'Right now the law requires us to maintain a line of sight with each drone,' says Kyle Peterson with UPS, 'so that's how we manage it with the test.  That may not be practical with our daily operation.' Peterson tells WSB the testing was a success, accomplishing all that they wanted, but the company still has some technology concerns that need to be worked out. 'I think it's both,' Peterson says.  'It's the regulations and the technology, so that's what we were testing the other day, trying to find out what we're capable of.' UPS has used drone technology in the past, for emergency deliveries. 'We used a drone to delivery an urgent, commercial package to an island over three miles of water,” Peterson says.  'So we flew from Massachusetts an asthma inhaler to an island called Children's Island, over three miles off the coast.' Peterson says the company will continue testing its drone delivery system, work on whatever technology they'll need to get right and be ready when and if, the laws catch up to drone technology. UPS Florida Drone Test Broll
  • The video of the crash was horrific. A car, being chased by the Georgia State Patrol, hits a sign on Gresham Road, then crashes, ejecting a small girl. We now know more about the girl, and the driver. Police are hunting for 25 year old Kadeem D'Anto Fletcher, who was driving the car that was involved in Monday chase. The state patrol says he was speeding, prompting on officer to try and pull him over. That's when Fletcher tried speeding off, starting the chase. When he reached Gresham Road, police say, Fletcher jumped the curb, hit a sign, and wrecked at a gas station. The whole incident was caught on video:   According to the patrol, Fletcher ran off, after 7 year old Serenity Largue was ejected.  Fletcher ran back to the accident scene, checked out the car, then ran off again. 'It's just disturbing on the highest level,' says Sergeant James Buchanan, with the state patrol.  'You have an individual that abandons a 7 year old child.' The girl was transported to Egleston Children's Hospital, where she's recovering. The patrol has been able to learn more about the girl, and the 2011 Audi that crashed. 'The little girl is not his child,' Buchanan says, 'She is the girlfriend's child.' Buchanan says, up until the crash, Fletcher's only offense had been driving without a license.  Now he faces a host of charges.
  • Atlanta police have arrested the suspect they believe is responsible for the murder of a young woman at Underground Atlanta earlier this month. 24-year-old Felix Shirley was identified through video and tips called in to Crimestoppers. He is the suspect in the murder of 26-year-old Misha Moore, who was found shot to death at Underground on January 10. 'There was some connection that they did know each other,' says APD Lieutenant Charles Hampton, 'I'm not sure exactly how they knew each other, but it was not just a random encounter.' Hampton says police do not know if Shirley is still in the Atlanta area.  He was wearing a construction hat at the time of the killing, and police found that he had been working as a construction worker at Mercedes Benz stadium.
  • It's one of Georgia's best known companies, and they're expanding their Alpharetta headquarters. That means new buildings and a lot more jobs. Jackson Healthcare has announced the expansion all of their campus off of Northwinds Parkway. It includes 306,000 square feet of office space, including a new headquarters building which will be eight stories high and have 267,000 square feet of space. In addition, there will be eight 39,000 square-foot amenities building that will be three stories high and built to look like the Roman Coliseum. It will house a gym, a pool, a restaurant, dry cleaning, open a barber, massage, and I'll spray tanning studio. The project will be completed with a new parking deck with a capacity of 1385 spaces.  It, too, will have an Italian feel to it. As for the 1400 jobs, company president Shane Jackson says that they will be well paying, above the median for income, and will feature college graduates and IT specialists. The $100 million project will take 18 months to complete. Ground will be broken within the next 60 days.
  • Spaghetti Junction is no surprise.  The other two shouldn't be either.  The American Transportation Research Institute is out with its list of the worst interchanges for truck bottlenecks in the country and, once again, the 85-285 interchange tops the list.  It's the second year in a row that Spaghetti Junction is listed as the worst in the U.S.  Number 9 on the list, with the ATRI has been putting out since 2002, was the northwest corridor, at the intersection of 75 and 285.  Number 14 is the interchange at Interstate 20 and 285 on the west side, near 6 Flags.  '75 is such a heavy truck route anyway,' says Rebecca Brewster, President and COO of the ATRI.  'And we do see impacts throughout the bottleneck analysis when you do see construction at a certain location.'  Brewster tells WSB, good climate also means volume at the interchanges and, given the interstates that run through this area, Atlanta has become a crossroads for trade routes throughout the country.  'So many people seem to think that the northeast is the worst place for congestion,' Brewster says.  'The truck drivers I speak to all say that no, it's really bad around Atlanta.
  • The city says it's doing what it can but it's up to Fulton County to do animal control. Fulton County says it can provide help to the 14 cities in the county, including Atlanta, but it will cost. The recent dog attacks in one Atlanta neighborhood has prompted an ordinance from the Atlanta City Council.  The chairman of the Fulton County Commission says they are here to help, but the city will need to pay for the extra animal control officers. 'If cities want better coverage and more services regarding animal control, yes, we will provide it,' says Chairman John Eaves, 'but there's a cost that goes with it.  We will provide the service when the monies are made available to cover the cost of the service.'' Eaves tells WSB, the county has an agreement with the cities to cover animal control duties.  If a city wants more coverage then that city needs to pay for more coverage. 'Our goal is to provide as much animal control coverage as is needed,' says Eaves. 'The cities need to pony up that money per our agreement to provide the service.' Eaves says Fulton County Animal Control has been busy. Since the first of the year they've received 712 calls for service in just the city of Atlanta. The discussion from the city and county was prompted by the most recent dog attack.  A 48 year old man was mauled by two dogs, including a pit bull, in the street in an Atlanta neighborhood.  Seven days earlier two children were attacked by two dogs as the kids walked to a school bus stop.  One of the children was killed.  The other was severely injured.    
  • When Faye Butler was born in 1918, the star player for the Red Sox was Babe Ruth, World War I was five months away from ending, and women could not vote. Butler, who was born in Iowa and lives in Decatur, is 98 years old and has now voted in her 20th presidential election. She cast her ballot for Hillary Clinton, meaning the woman who was born before women had the right to vote has voted for a woman for president. 'I'm sure that she's going to be Madam President,' Butler says. She tells WSB she's not surprised. 'I've been thinking about this for 10 years now and I was really disappointed that she didn't make it the first time.' Butler was born in Council Bliffs, where her younger sister (younger by 18 months) still lives. She says that when she voted this year she thought about her mother and women like Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, who fought for the right. 'When I heard what they did in order to get us the right to vote,' she says, 'I think that young women need to get out and vote.' Butler says she did not hear either her mother or grandmother tell stories about being represented by people they could not vote for, but did relay one story about her grandmother and the time she was getting ready to vote for the first time. 'I asked her if she was going to vote and she said no,' Butler says, 'because she said she would eliminate Pa's vote if she did. 'So I told her that, if I ever got married and he was going to vote for someone I didn't like, I was going to make sure to vote.” Butler, who was a charter subscriber to Ms. Magazine (and still has the Margaret doll she bought when she purchased the subscription), says she often considers herself lucky to be born before women could vote and now has voted for a woman.
  • When Faye Butler was born in 1918, the star pitcher for the Boston Red Sox was Babe Ruth, World War I was five months away from ending and women could not vote. >> Read more trending stories Butler, who was born in Iowa and lives in Decatur, Georgia, is 98 years old and has now voted in her 20th presidential election. She cast her ballot for Hillary Clinton, meaning the woman who was born before women had the right to vote has voted for a woman for president. 'I'm sure that she's going to be Madam President,' Butler says. 'I've been thinking about this for 10 years now and I was really disappointed that she didn't make it the first time.' Butler was born in Council Bluffs, where her sister (younger by 18 months) still lives. She says that when she voted this year she thought about her mother and women like Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, who fought for the right. 'When I heard what they did in order to get us the right to vote,' she says, 'I think that young women need to get out and vote.' Butler says she did not hear either her mother or grandmother tell stories about being represented by people they could not vote for, but did relay one story about her grandmother and the time she was getting ready to vote for the first time. 'I asked her if she was going to vote and she said no,' Butler says, 'because she said she would eliminate Pa's vote if she did. 'So I told her that, if I ever got married and he was going to vote for someone I didn't like, I was going to make sure to vote.” At the age of 22, Butler's very first presidential vote went to Franklin D. Roosevelt. 'I guess I liked his fireside chats,” Butler told WSB-TV. And so began a lifetime of voting Democrat. The sole exception: the election of 1948. Faye's family was afraid President Harry Truman was in cahoots with political bosses in Kansas City. 'Well, we assumed that Truman was part of this. So we voted for Dewey,' Butler said. Butler, who was a charter subscriber to Ms. magazine (and still has the Margaret doll she bought when she purchased the subscription), says she often considers herself lucky to be born before women could vote and now has voted for a woman. 'I just believe in women's rights. I just believe that Hillary is going to make it,' Butler told WSB-TV. And with a smile on her face Butler said she will accept the results of the election.
  • The damage to Colonial Pipeline's main gas line into Atlanta is causing gas shortages in the metro area and a lot of repairs for the company. 'Our focus is getting our main line back in service this week,' says Steve Baker, with Colonial. 'I think motorists will start to see some relief. This is a temporary situation, but it's also a time to be prudent. This is not a repair that flips a switch and everything is back to normal quickly.' The pipeline ruptured on September 9, in Alabama, causing a disruption of service in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia. Baker tells WSB once the line is repaired it will take a few days for stations to get back to full capacity. The gas will need to get to the Atlanta market, go to the terminals, then onto delivery trucks, and then go to the stations for drivers. In the meantime, Baker says, Pipeline 2 is operating and some product did make it into the Atlanta area over this past weekend. But, again, it will take a few days before it reaches station and get into the tanks of vehicles.
  • Jon Lewis

    Field Reporter

    Jon Lewis has been a reporter for WSB for 20 years starting in 1997. He is originally from New York. His top stories include going to Norway to cover Jimmy Carter receiving the Nobel Peace prize. 

    Read More

News

  • An off-duty Fulton County police officer shot a man after a chase in Atlanta Wednesday morning, the GBI says. The officer, whose name has not been released, was in his personal vehicle about 11 a.m., when he responded to a theft at a T-Mobile store on Mount Zion Parkway in Morrow, GBI spokesman Rich Bahan said.  The officer followed the suspect’s car into the city limits of Atlanta while reporting the incident to 911, Bahan said. At some point near Alyson Court, the two cars collided and when the driver got out of his car the off-duty officer shot him with his service weapon, Bahan said.   MORE:  Sheriff: Man out on bond for murder arrested after fighting victim’s family Ex-NFL player jailed after allegedly attacking woman in front of kids Police: Men brought ‘bag of bullets’ to shootout with alleged gang members Witness Jay Mitchell told Channel 2 Action News he thinks the man was shot in the stomach area after the police officer chased him and tried to pull him over. The suspect kept driving even after he was shot, Bahan said, and Atlanta police stopped him in the 1700 block of Lakewood Avenue. Whether the off-duty Fulton County officer stayed on the scene was not released, but his car was found parked at a store on Cleveland Avenue, Channel 2 reported. The man who was shot was taken to Grady Memorial Hospital, Bahan said. The shooting is the fourth in less than a week involving a Georgia officer. A Georgia State Patrol trooper fatally shot a man after a chase early Saturday in Polk County. Jason Dennis Watkins, 36, was taken to Polk County Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. RELATED: GSP trooper fatally shoots man after chase Willie Ivy III, 29, of Atlanta, died after a Fulton County police officer and an armed security guard shot him early Saturday in College Park, the GBI said.  RELATED: Man dead in police-involved shooting incident in College Park A Pickens County sheriff’s sergeant on Tuesday shot and critically injured Gary Lee Castle after he “moved aggressively” toward the official “with a large metal pipe in his hand,” the sheriff’s office said. RELATED: Sergeant shoots, critically injures man, Pickens County sheriff says In January and February, the GBI conducted 17 officer-involved shooting investigations, agency spokeswoman Nelly Miles said. RELATED: OVER THE LINE: Police shootings in Georgia The GBI investigated 78 police shootings in the state last year. In other news:
  • A middle school bus driver in the Valdosta area is accused of driving under the influence of alcohol while students were on her bus, according to the Lowndes County sheriff. Amanda Mullinax, 41, registered more than twice the legal limit, Lowndes County Sheriff Ashley Paulk said. A school resource officer at Hahira Middle School smelled alcohol on Mullinax, and a student said she had been drinking, the Macon Telegraph reported. The night before, deputies were called to a domestic dispute at Mullinax’s home and found she had been drinking heavily, Paulk said. RELATED: School bus driver charged in accident that injured child She could face multiple counts of child endangerment since there were about 44 students on the bus, the newspaper reported. Read more of the story here. In other news:
  • U.S. Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch vowed to uphold the law if confirmed to the nation’s highest court, not tipping his hand as he sidestepped controversial political subjects, as Gorsuch directly pushed back against President Donald Trump’s criticism of federal judges. “When anyone criticizes the honesty or integrity, the motives of a federal judge, I find that disheartening; I find that demoralizing,” Gorsuch said in response to questions from Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT). “Anyone including the President of the United States?” Blumenthal pressed. “Anyone is anyone,” Gorsuch replied. In a day of testimony that stretched for almost twelve hours, Gorsuch parried most questions from Democrats, who tried in vain to get him to reveal his views on issues like abortion, and items that might come before the Supreme Court, like President Trump’s travel ban. Gorsuch repeatedly refused to take the bait. “I can’t get involved in politics, and I think it would be very imprudent of judges to start commenting on political disputes,” Gorsuch said. Under questioning from Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Gorsuch was asked what he had discussed with President Trump on the issue of abortion. “In that interview did he ever ask you to overrule Roe v Wade?” Graham asked. “No, Senator,” Gorsuch replied, adding that if the President had asked that question, “I would have walked out the door.” Gorsuch was pressed about the President in a number of different ways, telling Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) that, “nobody is above the law in this country, and that includes the President of the United States.” With Republicans strongly in support of Gorsuch, there was already maneuvering behind the scenes over the expected floor fight in the Senate, as Democrats have made clear they think the GOP should be forced to get 60 votes for his nomination. That has prompted GOP leaders to criticize the threat of a filibuster. “If there aren’t 60 votes for a nominee like Neil Gorsuch it’s appropriate to ask the question is there any nominee any Republican president could make that Democrats would approve,” said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Gorsuch’s lengthy day of testimony ended on a light note, as Sen. John Kennedy (R-LA) suggested to Gorsuch that he have a cocktail before bed. “Just don’t drink vodka,” Kennedy said to chuckles from the audience. Kennedy then drew even more laughter by adding in one more surprise. “You never been to Russia, have you?” “I’ve never been to Russia,” a smiling Gorsuch said.
  • Donald Trump Jr. is facing criticism for tweeting in the hours after Wednesday's London attack a months-old comment from London Mayor Sadiq Khan that terror attacks are part of living in a big city. Trump Jr. tweeted : 'You have to be kidding me?!: Terror attacks are part of living in big city, says London Mayor Sadiq Khan.' The tweet included a link to a Sept. 22 story from Britain's Independent newspaper that includes the quote from Khan, who was asking Londoners to be vigilant following a bombing in New York City. British Member of Parliament Wes Streeting was among numerous Britons who responded to the tweet with criticism. He called Trump Jr. 'a disgrace' and accused him of using a terrorist attack for 'political gain.' When asked about Trump Jr. on Thursday, Khan told CNN: 'I'm not going to respond to a tweet from Donald Trump Jr. I've been doing far more important things over the past 24 hours.' He added that 'terrorists hate the fact' that cities including London, New York and Paris have 'diverse communities living together peacefully.