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  • House, Senate go different ways on probe of election meddling by Russia

    Leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. elections vowed at a joint news conference on Wednesday to conduct a thorough and bipartisan probe, clearly setting themselves apart from their House counterparts, who are locked in a bitter, partisan struggle over the course of their review.

    “The committee will go wherever the intelligence leads us,” said Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC), the Chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee.

    “We’re here to assure you – and more importantly the American people who are watching and listening – that we will get to the bottom of this,” said Sen. [More]

  • Government watchdog to review Trump travel costs to Mar-a-Lago

    At the request of four Democrats in the Congress, the Government Accountability Office has agreed to formally review how much money the feds spend, and what security precautions are taken, when President Donald Trump takes a weekend away at his Mar-a-Lago retreat in Palm Beach, Florida.

    The request for a GAO review came from three Democratic Senators and one House member – the GAO says it will “review security and site-related travel expenses related to the President’s stays outside the White House at Mar-a-Lago.

    The lawmakers who made the request were Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Sen. Tom Udall (D-NM), Sen. [More]

  • House Republicans struggle to revive health care overhaul plan

    Still smarting from last week’s meltdown on a bill to overhaul the Obama health law, House Republicans used a closed door “family meeting” in the U.S. Capitol to both clear the air, and see if there was a way to push forward again on a plan to make major changes to Obamacare.

    “We had a very constructive meeting with our members,” said Speaker Paul Ryan about the focus on a GOP measure on health care reform. “I’m not going to put a timeline on it.”

    “I think there’s a good healthy discussion going on in there,” said Rep. Austin Scott (R-GA), [More]

  • White House: Trump not giving up on overhaul of Obama health law

    Three days after a GOP health care bill melted down in the U.S. House before a vote, the White House said President Trump is not giving up on his desire to overhaul the Obama health law, as Republicans in the Congress also urged the President to keep pushing ahead on major health insurance changes.

    “I don’t think it’s dead,” said White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said of the failed GOP health bill, which foundered even after repeated efforts by the President to twist the arms of reluctant Republican lawmakers.

    “We’re at the beginning of a process. I don’t think [More]

  • Democrats force delay in Senate committee vote on Gorsuch nomination

    Democrats used rules in the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday to force a one week delay in a vote on the nomination of Neil Gorsuch for the U.S. Supreme Court, as Democratic opponents sent mixed signals on whether or not they would lead an all-out filibuster against President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee.

    The delay by Democrats – which they can do only once before the Judiciary Committee – also included two other top nominations by President Trump to the Justice Department.

    All three of those nominees are expected to gain committee approval next week – from there, it is on to [More]

  • After health care bill failure, Trump has few legislative victories on the horizon in Congress

    After a Republican push in Congress on a GOP health care overhaul bill melted down last Friday, there are not many opportunities for President Donald Trump to turn things around on Capitol Hill right now, as with little of his agenda in the pipeline, it is possible that the President may have to waits months for a significant legislative achievement to make it through the Congress.

    Here is where things stand on Capitol Hill for the Trump Administration.

    1. Lots of campaign promises, but little ready for action. With the GOP health care bill seemingly now off the agenda in the Congress, [More]

  • Infowars’ Alex Jones apologizes for pushing “Pizzagate” conspiracy theory

    In a surprise legal turnabout, Alex Jones, the chief of the website Infowars has publicly backpedaled on the “Pizzagate” conspiracy theory, issuing a written and videotaped apology to the owner of a Washington, D.C. pizza parlor that became a target for many election critics of Hillary Clinton.

    The Pizzagate theory developed from emails hacked from top Clinton aide John Podesta – many seemingly taken out of context – which somehow convinced people that a child sex ring was operating out of the Comet Ping Post restaurant in D.C., a popular neighborhood pizza joint owned by Clinton supporter, James Alefantis.

    “We raised questions [More]

  • What’s next for Trump, GOP agenda after health care debacle

    After the collapse of health care reform legislation in the House on Friday, Republicans in the Congress and President Donald Trump now must decide what’s next on their respective agendas, as the GOP tries to pick up the pieces from a very public legislative failure over an issue that had been their central political focus for the last seven years.

    Here’s the look from Capitol Hill.

    1. The first big setback for the Trump agenda. You can try to downplay what happened, but there was little positive to take from this health care debacle in the House. “I will not sugarcoat [More]

  • Trump, Republicans give up on GOP health care bill

    Unable to convince GOP lawmakers to get on board with a plan to overhaul the Obama health law, Republicans in the House decided not to even force a vote on the measure, a major setback for both President Donald Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan.

    “This is a setback – no two ways about it,” said Speaker Paul Ryan, after he told GOP lawmakers that there were not enough votes.

    “I will not sugarcoat this; this is a disappointing day for us,” Ryan added. “We came really close today, but we came up short.”

    Down at the White House, President Trump took [More]

  • Trump, Republicans to roll the dice with Friday health care vote

    Determined to push a health overhaul bill through the House, President Donald Trump is basically daring GOP lawmakers to vote against the plan, as Republican leaders in Congress unveiled several new changes to the bill on Thursday night, hoping they would bring conservatives and moderates on board to avoid what would be an embarrassing political defeat on the politically explosive issue of health care.

    Here is the latest from Capitol Hill:

    1. White House decides it is simply time to vote. Looking to avoid a never-ending parade of negotiations that might not bear fruit, President Trump had his lieutenants go to Capitol [More]

News

  • Pickens County deputies are searching for an armed fugitive.  Authorities are looking for Nicholas Bishop in the area of Priest Circle in Talking Rock.  Bishop is believed to be armed with a handgun and on foot after he abandoned a stolen vehicle around 2 p.m.  If you see him, call 911 immediately. Officials say do not attempt to approach him. - Please return for updates.
  • One more time, Doris Payne, the 86-year-old infamous international jewel thief, has pleaded guilty to the usual crime. She admitted Wednesday to stealing a necklace from Von Maur at Perimeter Mall last year, the DeKalb County District Attorney’s Office said. Payne, who recently said she’s been dealing with a possibly cancerous tumor, was sentenced to 120 days of house arrest and three years of probation.  She was also banned from all Von Maur locations and every mall in DeKalb County. Payne, who’d been free on bond, was arrested last month for missing a court date. Shortly after the would-be appearance, she told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution she wasn’t medically able to attend. “I ain’t runnin’,” she said in a phone interview. “I’ve never in my life been late for court. Last month, Payne was deemed too ill to stand trial by the judge presiding over a Fulton County case stemming from a missing set of earrings at Phipps Plaza. Payne has been open about her habits of theft, which she detailed in a documentary called, “The Life and Crimes of Doris Payne.” RELATED: Huge DeKalb center with (at least) 8 popular chains is opening soon RELATED: Cop helps elderly woman who got kicked out of dentist office in DeKalb RELATED: A DeKalb family’s tale of two dead bodies and a crying baby girl Like DeKalb County News Now on Facebook | Follow on Twitter and Instagram
  • A drunken driver destroyed a row of headstones at a historic Carrollton cemetery, causing tens of thousands of dollars' worth of damage, police said. According to police, the driver was coming down Martin Luther King Street on March 19, ran a stop sign, jumped a curb and crashed into the city-owned cemetery. The broken headstones range in date from the late 1800s to 1950. 'And what we discussed is, if one is damaged beyond repair, we'll put something back that's respectful. It's hard to replace it with the exact same item. The families aren't around anymore, so the city will take on the responsibility,' city manager Tim Grizzard said. TRENDING STORIES: Thousands of Georgians could lose food stamps next week 16-year-old in custody after hoax call about school gunman Food prices at SunTrust Park vs. Mercedes-Benz Stadium: What's the difference? The 35-year-old driver, Ray Antonio Baker, was arrested and charged with DUI. City officials said they will ask his insurance carrier to pay for the damage. 'Our plan is to go after the individual's insurance to pay for repairs. If that doesn't pay for everything, the city will certainly pick up the tab,' Grizzard said. Officials said this isn't the first time a driver has damaged headstones, but it's not a big enough problem to put up a wall. 'It's not something that has happened often enough that we need to put up a barrier. If it was a recurrent spot, we would do something,' Grizzard said. City officials said it could take weeks to repair the damage.
  • Their hug was silent, their smiles broad. After more than six weeks in custody, a Mexican man who had been arrested despite his participation in a program designed to prevent the deportation of those brought to the U.S. illegally as children was freed Wednesday pending deportation proceedings. Daniel Ramirez Medina, 24, greeted his brother — also a participant in the program — in the lobby of the Federal Detention Center in Tacoma, surrounded by lockers and metal detectors. 'He's free to go,' a guard told them, and after conferring with one of his lawyers, Ramirez stepped into the sunshine and hugged his brother again for a crowd of news cameras waiting just beyond the chain link-and-barbed wire fence. He spoke to reporters briefly in Spanish, thanking his supporters, and later issued a written statement in English through his lawyers. 'I'm so happy to be reunited with my family today and can't wait to see my son,' it said. 'This has been a long and hard 46 days, but I'm so thankful for the support that I've gotten from everyone who helped me and for the opportunity to live in such an amazing country. I know that this isn't over, but I'm hopeful for the future, for me and for the hundreds of thousands of other Dreamers who love this country like I do.' Judge John Odell in Tacoma approved freeing the 24-year-old Ramirez on $15,000 bond until his next immigration court hearing. Immigration agents arrested him last month in suburban Seattle, saying he acknowledged affiliating with gangs. Officials then revoked his protected status. Ramirez adamantly denies any gang ties or making any such admission. He spent 40 minutes answering questions from prosecutors during a two-hour hearing Tuesday, repeatedly denying any gang connections, his attorney, Mark Rosenbaum, said. 'He answered every question the government put to him,' Rosenbaum said. 'He stayed true, and the government had no evidence whatsoever.' U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement issued a statement Wednesday noting that Ramirez's own attorneys had twice declined to have their client participate in bond hearings that could have resulted in his earlier release — something his lawyers said was designed to keep his case in federal court, rather than immigration court. Immigration agents arrested Ramirez on Feb. 10 at an apartment complex where they had gone to arrest his father, a previously deported felon. Ramirez, who came to the U.S. at 7, has no criminal record and twice passed background checks to participate in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which allows young people brought to the U.S. illegally as children to stay in the country and work. Immigration officials have started deportation proceedings against him. His legal team, which includes the Los Angeles based pro-bono firm Public Counsel as well as Harvard Law professor Laurence Tribe, have pressed claims in federal court that the arrest and detention violated Ramirez's constitutional rights. They sought to keep the case out of immigration court, saying U.S. District Court was better suited to handle those claims. A federal magistrate judge in Seattle agreed to hear the constitutional claims, but declined to release him in the meantime. U.S. District Judge Ricardo Martinez upheld the decision not to release him last week, saying he instead should challenge his detention in immigration court. Martinez nevertheless said 'many questions remain regarding the appropriateness of the government's conduct' in arresting him. Among those questions, his lawyers have said, is whether U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents misinterpreted a tattoo on his forearm when they described it as a 'gang tattoo' in an arrest report. The lawyers say the tattoo, which says 'La Paz BCS,' pays homage to the city of La Paz in the Mexican state of Baja California Sur, where he was born. Ramirez's case is one of several recent arrests that have left immigration activists fearing an erosion of protections under the DACA program instituted by President Barack Obama in 2012. ICE agents in Portland, Oregon, on Sunday arrested Francisco J. Rodriguez Dominguez, a DACA participant who was brought to the U.S. from Morelia, in Mexico's Michoacan state, at age 5. Last December, he entered a diversion program following a drunken driving arrest and had attended all his court dates and required meetings, the American Civil Liberties Union of Oregon said in a statement. The agency said Monday that it targeted Rodriguez Dominguez because of the DUI and that he would be released on bond pending deportation proceedings. About 750,000 immigrants have enrolled in the DACA program since it began.