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4-year-old leukemia patient gets standing ovation at Fenway
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4-year-old leukemia patient gets standing ovation at Fenway

4-year-old leukemia patient gets standing ovation at Fenway
Photo Credit: Michael Dwyer
Clouds form over Fenway Park during a baseball game between the Boston Red Sox and the Tampa Bay Rays in Boston, Monday, July 29, 2013. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

4-year-old leukemia patient gets standing ovation at Fenway

A 4-year-old singer brought the crowd to its feet at a recent Red Sox game at Fenway Park in Boston.

Darla Holloway, who is suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia, sang “God Bless America” during the seventh-inning stretch Tuesday night. She is currently undergoing chemotherapy treatments, but told Boston sports-talk show "Mut & Merloni" that she was practicing every day for her Fenway Park debut.

Before the game, Darla was also part of the Jimmy Fund chorus that sang the National Anthem.

Her performance was part of the WEEI-NESN Jimmy Fund Radio Telethon taking place Tuesday and Wednesday. You can help by making a gift here; so far, over $1 million has been raised.

--Sources: Morning Rush, SBNation

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