ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
76°
Scattered Clouds
H 82° L 60°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    76°
    Current Conditions
    Partly Cloudy. H NaN° L 59°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    NaN°
    Today
    Partly Cloudy. H NaN° L 59°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day Created with Sketch.
    82°
    Tomorrow
    Chance of T-storms. H 82° L 60°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

World News

    South Korea's disgraced ex-President Park Geun-hye was being questioned Thursday by a court that will decide if she should be arrested over corruption allegations that have already toppled her from power. Live TV footage earlier showed a stern looking Park the Seoul Central District Court building amid a barrage of camera flashes. She did not comment to reporters. The court is expected to decide by Friday morning whether to approve her arrest. If the court approves the arrest warrant, Park will be immediately sent to a detention facility as prosecutors can detain her for up to 20 days before laying formal charges. If the court rejects the arrest request, prosecutors can still indict and charge her. Prosecutors accuse Park of colluding with a confidante to extort from big businesses, take a bribe from one of the companies and commit other wrongdoings. The allegations prompted millions of South Koreans to stage streets protests every weekend for months before the Constitutional Court ruled to dismiss her on March 10. Park's presidential powers had already been suspended after parliament impeached her in December. It was a dramatic setback to Park, South Korea's first female president who rose to power four years ago amid conservatives' nostalgia for her late dictator father who is credited by supporters for pulling a war-torn country out of poverty in the 1960-70s. Liberal critics revile her father as a ruthless leader who tortured and imprisoned his opponents. Earlier Thursday, hundreds of her supporters, mostly elderly conservative citizens, gathered near her Seoul home, waving national flags and chanting slogans when she left for the court. Prosecutors say they want to arrest Park because her alleged crimes are 'grave' and other suspects involved the scandal, including her confidante Choi Soo-sil, have already been arrested. In the coming weeks, prosecutors are expected to formally charge Park with extortion, bribery and abuse of power. A bribery conviction alone is punishable by up to life in prison in South Korea. Park and Choi deny most of the allegations. Park has said she only let Choi edit some of her presidential speeches and got her help on 'public relations' issues. Choi made similar statements. The women, both in their 60s, have been friends for 40 years. Park once described Choi as someone who helped her when she had 'difficulties,' an apparent reference to her parents' assassinations in the 1970s. Park's father Chung-hee was gunned down by his own intelligence chief in 1979, five years after his wife was killed in an assassination attempt that targeted him. Park Geun-hye served as first lady after her mother's death. While in office, Park Geun-hye had refused to meet with prosecutors, citing a law that gives a leader immunity from prosecution except for grave crimes such as treason. South Korea is to hold an election in May to choose Park's successor.
  • Pledging cooperation, the top Republican and Democrat on the Senate intelligence committee said Wednesday they would steer clear of politics in their panel's probe of Russian interference in last year's election. They made a point of putting themselves at arm's length from the House investigation marked by partisanship and disputes. Richard Burr of North Carolina, the GOP chairman of the Senate committee, told reporters on Capitol Hill he would not even answer questions about the House probe. 'We're not asking the House to play any role in our investigation. We don't plan to play any role in their investigation,' Burr said ahead of his panel's open hearing Thursday. Standing alongside his committee' ranking Democrat, Sen. Mark Warner of Virginia, Burr said: 'Mark and I work hand in hand on this. ... We're partners to see that this is completed and that we have a product at the end of the day that we can, in bipartisanship, support.' The senators' comments came the same day an attorney for former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn said the retired U.S. Army lieutenant general has not been interviewed by the Senate intelligence committee. One of Flynn's lawyers, Robert K. Kelner, said they have had discussions with committee staff members, but Flynn has not been contacted directly. So far, the committee has requested 20 individuals to be interviewed. Five have been scheduled, and the remaining 15 are likely to be scheduled within the next 10 days. Additional witnesses could also be interviewed. During a news conference, Burr identified just one of the witnesses: President Donald Trump's son-in-law, Jared Kushner. The White House has said Kushner, a senior adviser to Trump, has volunteered to answer questions about arranging meetings with the Russian ambassador and other officials. Asked whether the committee had spoken to Flynn or his representatives, Burr told reporters, 'It's safe to say that we have had conversations with a lot of people, and you would think less of us if General Flynn wasn't in that list.' Trump asked Flynn, a former director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, to step down last month from his post as national security adviser. The president said he made the decision because Flynn had misled Vice President Mike Pence and other White House officials about his conversations with Russia's ambassador to the U.S. Flynn's ties to Russia have been scrutinized by the FBI. They also are part of the House and Senate committee investigations into contacts between Trump campaign officials and Russians. On the House side, Democrats have called for intelligence committee Chairman Devin Nunes to recuse himself because of his previous ties with Donald Trump's team before Trump took office. Nunes, R-Calif., met with a secret source on the White House grounds last week to review classified material, which he says indicates that Trump associates' communications were captured in 'incidental' surveillance of foreigners. Trump has used Nunes' revelations to defend his claim that former President Barack Obama tapped phones at Trump Tower in New York, though Nunes and his committee's top Democrat, Adam Schiff of California, say there is no such evidence. In response to a reporter's question, Burr said he had not personally coordinated with the White House in shaping the scope of the Senate committee's investigation. Asked if he could promise to oversee an impartial probe, Burr responded: 'Absolutely. I'll do something I've never done. I'll admit I voted for him (Trump). ... But I've got a job in the U.S. Senate and ... it overrides any personal beliefs that I have or loyalties that I might have.' Warner said he had seen no evidence the White House was interfering and would complain publicly if he did. Ahead of Thursday's Senate hearing, Warner pledged to keep the investigation focused on the reason it was started. 'An outside foreign adversary effectively sought to hijack our most critical democratic process — the election of the president — and in the process decided to favor one candidate over another,' Warner said. 'I can assure you, they didn't do it because it was in the vested interest of the American people. 'Russia's goal, Vladimir Putin's goal, is a weaker United States — weaker economically, weaker globally — and that should be a concern to all Americans, regardless of party affiliation.' Burr said the investigation's mission is to look at all activities Russia might have undertaken to alter or influence the election and to examine contacts any campaign had with Russian government officials that could have influenced the process. He said committee staff members have been provided with an 'unprecedented amount' of documents, including some that, up until now, have been shared only with the so-called Gang of Eight — the Republican and Democratic leaders of both the House and Senate and the four leaders of the intelligence committees, plus their staff directors. Warner said some intelligence agencies have not been as cooperative as others in providing materials, and he declared, 'We cannot tell the American people our conclusions unless we have access to all the pertinent information.' Burr said the committee was in constant negotiations with intelligence officials about access to additional documents. ___ Associated Press writer Chad Day contributed to this report.
  • A suicide truck bomb targeted a police checkpoint in southern Baghdad on Wednesday night, killing 15 people and wounding 45, according to Iraqi officials. The bomber detonated the vehicle, an oil tanker laden with explosives, security and hospital officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity under regulations. Three policemen were among the dead while the rest were civilians, and a number of policemen were also wounded, the officials said. No one immediately claimed responsibility for the attack, but the Islamic State group has carried out similar attacks as their territorial hold in Iraq weakens. Iraqi forces are fighting IS in western Mosul, where some 2,000 IS fighters are launching fierce counterattacks. After the beginning the operation to retake Mosul in October, Iraqi authorities in January declared they have liberated eastern Mosul, which is separated from the city's western neighborhoods by the Tigris River. Western Mosul is densely populated and has proven to be a much more difficult fight for Iraqi and coalition forces, which have resorted to greater use of artillery and airstrikes to clear and hold territory. A number of airstrikes in western Mosul have resulted in high civilians casualties, according to residents interviewed by The Associated Press. The U.S.-led coalition says a strike in western Mosul on March 17 likely resulted in civilian casualties and is investigating the incident. Iraqi witnesses have said that airstrikes earlier this month killed scores of civilians. U.S. officials have said that the munitions used by the U.S.-led coalition that day should not have taken the entire building down, suggesting that militants may have deliberately gathered civilians there and planted other explosives that were detonated by airstrikes. The militants have suffered a string of defeats over the past two years in the lead up to the Mosul operation, but have continued to regularly launch attacks in and around Baghdad. A series of large-scale bombings claimed by IS has struck Baghdad since the operation to retake Mosul began. Iraqi and coalition officials have repeatedly warned that after Mosul, IS will likely return to its insurgent roots as it loses more territory in both Iraq and neighboring Syria.
  • Six people working at the U.S. Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, have been fired for using or possessing illegal drugs. A State Department official says the firings followed an investigation into allegations of misconduct. The official says those who were embassy employees have been fired and others who were contractors for the embassy have been removed from the contract. The official is declining to provide details about what led to the investigation. But the infractions are particularly troubling given the yearslong effort by the U.S. to address the narcotics trade in Afghanistan. Opium production is a major source of income for insurgents and the Taliban. The official wasn't authorized to discuss personnel situations publicly and requested anonymity.
  • The top Brexit official at the European Parliament thinks British political giants such as Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher would not look kindly on Prime Minister Theresa May turning over the hourglass on her country's withdrawal from the European Union. Brexit coordinator Guy Verhofstadt said Churchill, Britain's leader for most of World War II, would say in response to Wednesday's action, ''What is happening? I was always in favor of a European future for my country.' He would criticize it a lot.' Thatcher, too, despite her long-running feuds with the EU during the 1980s to pay less and get more in return, was at heart a pro-European, he said in an interview with The Associated Press. Verhofstadt, who will be closely involved in the exit negotiations as the main representative of the European Parliament, insisted that May's six-page letter triggering the talks carried an underlying message of regret. 'You ask yourself, after you have read the letter 'Why is Britain going outside the European Union?' Because in every chapter, in every chapter of the letter she defends the European Union and: 'Oh, it was so good, but OK, we have to go out.'' The European Parliament itself put out strong negotiating lines Wednesday, which are closely aligned to the tack chief negotiator EU Michel Barnier is expected to take. Although Verhofstadt technically will be subordinate to Barnier during the talks expected to start around the end of May, he represents the veto power of the legislature. 'If the outcome of the negotiations is not in conformity with the points and conditions we have made public today, yeah, then we will use our veto power, it is clear,' he said. EU officials and leaders of many member nations have made it clear that the first priority will be finding agreement on the future rights of the 3 million EU citizens living in Britain and the 1 million Britons living elsewhere in the bloc. Verhofstadt hopes to have that issue settled by the end of the year to provide clarity for those 4 million people. A residency agreement could be sealed off as a done deal before it would need to be rubber-stamped as part of the overall withdrawal package, he said. He said does not envision a final deal covering the nitty gritty of trade and other aspects of Britain's future relationship with the bloc, materializing within the two-year time frame outlined in the EU exit process. Will all kinds of national and parliamentary approvals needed, he thinks it would be impossible. Instead, Verhofstadt thinks it's likely there will be an extended transition period of 'I don't know, two, three, four years — we say no more than three years — to discuss, to detail the content of this future relationship.' Since British voters approved the referendum to leave the EU in June, Verhofstadt senses the pendulum swinging back on the continent to appreciation for the union's merits. 'Brexit has created a sort of a sentiment in public opinion saying 'Yeah, we are so very critical toward the European Union, but we are not so stupid as the Brits to go out or to destroy it,'' he said.
  • President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday visited an Arctic archipelago, part of Russia's efforts to reaffirm its foothold in the oil-rich region. On a tour on the Franz Josef Land archipelago, a sprawling collection of islands where the Russian military has recently built a new runway and worked to open a permanent base, Putin emphasized the need to protect Russia's economic and security interests in the Arctic. The Kremlin has named reaffirming the Russian presence in the Arctic as a top priority amid an intensifying rivalry over the region that is believed to hold up to one-quarter of the planet's undiscovered oil and gas. 'Natural resources, which are of paramount importance for the Russian economy, are concentrated in this region,' Putin said in remarks carried by Russian news agencies. Putin said that current estimates put the value of Arctic's mineral riches at $30 trillion. In 2015, Russia submitted a revised bid for vast territories in the Arctic to the United Nations, claiming 1.2 million square kilometers (over 463,000 square miles) of Artic sea shelf extending more than 350 nautical miles (about 650 kilometers) from the shore. Russia, the United States, Canada, Denmark and Norway have all been trying to assert jurisdiction over parts of the Arctic as shrinking polar ice creates new opportunities for exploration. Putin said Wednesday that Russia has remained open to a 'broad partnership with other nations to carry out mutually beneficial projects in tapping natural resources, developing global transport corridors and also in science and environment protection.' He also underlined the need for the military and security agencies to 'implement their plans to protect national interests, our defense capability and protection of our interests in the Arctic.' Over the past few years, the Russian military has been conducting a costly effort to restore and modernize abandoned Soviet-era outposts in the Arctic by rebuilding old air bases and deploying new air defense assets in the region. During the visit, Putin inspected a cavity in a glacier that scientists use to study permafrost. He also spoke with environmental experts who have worked to clean the area of Soviet-era debris. Natural Resources Minister Sergei Donskoi reported to Putin that the cleanup effort has seen the removal of 42,000 metric tons of waste from the archipelago, most of it rusty metal oil canisters left behind by the Soviet military.
  • Police who were searching for a farmer who vanished Sunday in Indonesia found him after villagers cut open a 23-foot reticulated python who apparently swallowed the 25-year-old, according to multiple reports. >> Read more trending news Family members reported Akbar, who goes by one name, as is common in Indonesia, missing on Sunday after he failed to return from a trip to the family’s palm oil plantation on the island of Sulawesi, AFP reported. Authorities found his body Monday after residents spotted the swollen python awkwardly slithering in the village of Salubiro, according to AFP. The python was near the plantation owned by Akbar’s family. 'We were immediately suspicious that the snake had swallowed Akbar because around the site we found palm fruit, his harvesting tool and a boot,' Junaidi, a senior village official, told AFP. Police spokesman Mashura told BBC Indonesia that villagers spotted the python in a ditch. “They grew suspicious that maybe the snake had Akbar,” Mashura said. “When they cut it open, Akbar was inside the snake.” Junaidi told AFP that the snake appeared to have swallowed Akbar whole. The death is the only known such fatality in the region, he said. It’s unusual for snakes to attempt to eat people. Brawijaya University’s Nia Kurniawan told BBC Indonesia that pythons of a similar size typically hunt boars and other large prey. They stay away from human settlements for the most part, Kurniawan said, but “would see palm oil plantations as a good hunting ground.” A security guard on the Indonesian island of Bali was killed in 2013 by a python, according to AFP.
  • The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations said Wednesday the United Nations is partnering with a 'corrupt' government in Congo and she called for a large cut in the world's largest peacekeeping mission in the troubled African nation. Speaking at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, Ambassador Nikki Haley said the U.N. mission in Congo 'is aiding a government that is inflicting predatory behavior against its own people.' Her comments came a day after Congo said the bodies of an American and a Swedish investigator for the U.N. and a Congolese colleague were found Monday in a shallow grave in a region that has seen months of deadly violence between government troops and local militias. Congo says it will investigate. Haley's accusation also comes as the U.N. Security Council is preparing to vote Friday on a resolution extending the mandate of the peacekeeping mission in Congo, whose main job is to protect civilians caught in conflict. The mission, known as MONUSCO, has about 22,400 people, including nearly 17,000 soldiers and over 1,350 police, and is the biggest and costliest with a budget of $1.2 billion. The Trump administration has been vocal about reducing U.S. funding for the United Nations as part of proposed deep cuts in foreign aid. That includes U.N. peacekeeping. Haley said that 'we can reduce the troops tremendously' in the peacekeeping mission in Congo, which has struggled to defeat rebel groups operating in the eastern part of the vast, mineral-rich nation. A Security Council diplomat, speaking on condition of anonymity because details of the measure had not yet been disclosed, said members have agreed to cut the total number of troops to just over 16,000. Last week, U.N. peacekeeping chief Herve Ladsous stressed that council members should take into account that this is a key year in Congo, with a very important presidential election 'in a very delicate context' scheduled by December and renewed security tensions not only in the volatile east 'but also in new areas like the Kasais.' France, Britain and others have also voiced concerns about major cuts this year. Since taking the post of U.S. ambassador earlier this year, Haley has begun a mission-by-mission review of peacekeeping operations to assess their effectiveness. President Donald Trump has pledged to drastically cut funding for international organizations and reduce the U.S. share for U.N. peacekeeping operations from roughly 28 percent of total costs to 25 percent. Haley also spoke on South Sudan, an African nation gripped by civil war and famine, saying there is 'no political solution in sight.' She said it is time to rethink the mandate of the U.N. peacekeeping mission there, and she criticized South Sudan's government for restricting access for aid workers. 'We actually have to punish the government for not allowing us to bring in aid,' Haley said. ___ Associated Press writer Edith M. Lederer at the United Nations contributed to this report.
  • Melania Trump helped present State Department awards Wednesday to 13 women from around the globe who were recognized for demonstrating courage and leadership in the face of adversity, a group she praised as 'true heroes.' The first lady, on her first visit to a Cabinet department, joined Thomas Shannon, undersecretary of state for political affairs, to present the Secretary of State's International Women of Courage Award. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was traveling to Turkey. The award is given to women around the world who have shown courage and leadership while advocating for peace, justice, human rights, gender equality and women's empowerment — often at personal risk. One of the honorees, Natalia Ponce de Leon, of Colombia, started a foundation to defend and protect the human rights of victims of acid attacks after a stalker doused her face and body with sulfuric acid in March 2014. Another woman, Malebogo Molefhe, of Botswana, became an advocate for female victims of gender-based violence after she was attacked, including being shot eight times, by an ex-boyfriend in 2009. She uses a wheelchair due to injuries suffered during the assault. During brief remarks, Mrs. Trump asked the audience to imagine being any of the 13 women on stage with her. 'Ask yourself if you would have the fortitude of spirit, the courage of your convictions and the enormous inner strength required to stand up and fight against such overwhelming odds,' she said. 'Amazingly, each of our honorees has courageously answered 'Yes' to those questions.' 'These honorees, who have fought on the front lines against injustice, are true heroes,' she continued, adding that their bravery is a reminder that 'there is always hope whenever the human spirit is brought to bear in the service of others.' Wednesday's honorees hail from Bangladesh, Botswana, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Iraq, Niger, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Sri Lanka, Syria, Turkey, Vietnam and Yemen. In April, the women will take part in a State Department-sponsored exchange program in several U.S. cities. More than 100 women from more than 60 countries have been recognized with courage awards since 2007, the department said. Mrs. Trump's participation in the award ceremony amounted to a rare public appearance for her in Washington, outside of the White House. She hosted a White House luncheon for International Women's Day earlier this month. Wednesday's appearance also fell in the middle of a busy week in the nation's capital for the first lady. She and President Donald Trump hosted a White House reception Tuesday night for all 100 U.S. senators and their spouses. Mrs. Trump also planned a third appearance Thursday in Washington, but the White House has not released any details. After joining Shannon at the State Department, the first lady later appeared at a White House panel discussion on women's empowerment, where Trump introduced his wife, a former model, as a 'very highly accomplished woman.' He mentioned that her poll numbers are higher than his, and also said she 'feels so strongly about' empowering women. Since her husband's Jan. 20 inauguration, the first lady has lived mostly at the family's Trump Tower penthouse in midtown Manhattan with the couple's son, Barron, 11. She often meets the president in Palm Beach, Florida, when he spends weekends at his waterfront estate there. Trump has said his wife and son will move to the White House after Barron's school year ends. ___ Follow Darlene Superville on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dsupervilleap
  • British Prime Minister Theresa May says Britain's exit from the European Union is an opportunity to build an 'independent, self-governing, global Britain.' As Britain officially starts the two-year leaving process, here's a look at some of the challenges ahead: WHAT'S AT STAKE? Negotiations will determine future relations between Britain's estimated 65 million people and the roughly 435 million people living in the 27 other EU countries. Key questions include whether they will be able to live, work and study in each other's countries and how freely goods and services can be transported between Britain and the EU. MONEY, MONEY, MONEY The EU says Britain can't leave without settling its bill, paying up for the U.K.'s share of staff pensions and projects it has already agreed to fund. European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker has put the figure at around 50 billion euros ($63 billion). Britain agrees it will have to pay something, but is sure to quibble over how much. WHAT DO WE TALK ABOUT FIRST? Substantive talks are unlikely to start until May at the earliest — after an April 29 summit of 27 EU leaders to settle their negotiating stance, and after France holds a May 7 presidential election. EU officials insist the divorce terms must be settled before talks on a new relationship can begin. Britain hopes the two tracks — divorce terms and future relationship — can run in parallel. WHAT ARE THE RED LINES? The EU says it will not compromise on its core 'four freedoms': free movement of goods, capital, services and workers. Britain insists that it must regain the right to control immigration and end free movement from other EU countries into Britain. May says Britain will leave the EU's single market in goods and services and its tariff-free customs union, but nonetheless wants 'frictionless' free trade. It is hard to see how the U.K. can impose immigration restrictions without facing some trade barriers. DEAL OR NO DEAL? Officials on both sides hope by 2019 either to have a deal, or an agreement to keep talking during a transitional period. But there is a third possibility, in which Britain crashes out of the EU without a deal. The final deal will have to be approved by both the British and European parliaments — and neither is guaranteed.

News

  • Pickens County deputies are searching for an armed fugitive.  Authorities are looking for Nicholas Bishop in the area of Priest Circle in Talking Rock.  Bishop is believed to be armed with a handgun and on foot after he abandoned a stolen vehicle around 2 p.m.  If you see him, call 911 immediately. Officials say do not attempt to approach him. - Please return for updates.
  • One more time, Doris Payne, the 86-year-old infamous international jewel thief, has pleaded guilty to the usual crime. She admitted Wednesday to stealing a necklace from Von Maur at Perimeter Mall last year, the DeKalb County District Attorney’s Office said. Payne, who recently said she’s been dealing with a possibly cancerous tumor, was sentenced to 120 days of house arrest and three years of probation.  She was also banned from all Von Maur locations and every mall in DeKalb County. Payne, who’d been free on bond, was arrested last month for missing a court date. Shortly after the would-be appearance, she told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution she wasn’t medically able to attend. “I ain’t runnin’,” she said in a phone interview. “I’ve never in my life been late for court. Last month, Payne was deemed too ill to stand trial by the judge presiding over a Fulton County case stemming from a missing set of earrings at Phipps Plaza. Payne has been open about her habits of theft, which she detailed in a documentary called, “The Life and Crimes of Doris Payne.” RELATED: Huge DeKalb center with (at least) 8 popular chains is opening soon RELATED: Cop helps elderly woman who got kicked out of dentist office in DeKalb RELATED: A DeKalb family’s tale of two dead bodies and a crying baby girl Like DeKalb County News Now on Facebook | Follow on Twitter and Instagram
  • A drunken driver destroyed a row of headstones at a historic Carrollton cemetery, causing tens of thousands of dollars' worth of damage, police said. According to police, the driver was coming down Martin Luther King Street on March 19, ran a stop sign, jumped a curb and crashed into the city-owned cemetery. The broken headstones range in date from the late 1800s to 1950. 'And what we discussed is, if one is damaged beyond repair, we'll put something back that's respectful. It's hard to replace it with the exact same item. The families aren't around anymore, so the city will take on the responsibility,' city manager Tim Grizzard said. TRENDING STORIES: Thousands of Georgians could lose food stamps next week 16-year-old in custody after hoax call about school gunman Food prices at SunTrust Park vs. Mercedes-Benz Stadium: What's the difference? The 35-year-old driver, Ray Antonio Baker, was arrested and charged with DUI. City officials said they will ask his insurance carrier to pay for the damage. 'Our plan is to go after the individual's insurance to pay for repairs. If that doesn't pay for everything, the city will certainly pick up the tab,' Grizzard said. Officials said this isn't the first time a driver has damaged headstones, but it's not a big enough problem to put up a wall. 'It's not something that has happened often enough that we need to put up a barrier. If it was a recurrent spot, we would do something,' Grizzard said. City officials said it could take weeks to repair the damage.
  • George Clooney made the rounds at CinemaCon in Las Vegas on Tuesday to promote his upcoming movie, “Suburbicon.” A lot of red carpet chatter led him to use that time to share some details about his wife, lawyer Amal Clooney’s, pregnancy. She is reportedly expecting twins. >> Read more trending news Clooney joked with Entertainment Tonight about the two names he has picked out for his kids. “My wife says I can’t name them Casa and Amigos. That’s the one thing I’m not allowed to do,” he said, joking that he considered naming the twins after his tequila company, Casamigos. “It was just a thought. I mean, you know, it’s a family business,” he joked. Clooney told E News the parents-to-be have not picked out names yet. “I've had friends pick out names around their parents and then it becomes...whatever name you pick they're like, ‘Oh, I don't like that. That guy's a prime minister… Can't name her Susan. You remember your Aunt Susan?’” “I didn't know that we'd have kids,” he told E News. “I was very happy that we were going to get married, and then (a pregnancy) seemed like the next step.' Clooney said Amal Clooney is “doing really great.” “She is amazing,” he told Extra. “I don’t have anything to do. There is nothing I can do to help but make tea and stuff.” The Clooneys are expecting their twins, a boy and a girl, in June. Shortly after the pregnancy news broke, Clooney’s mom, Nina Clooney, shared details about the twins to Vogue. “It will be one of each! Yes, a boy and a girl. That’s what I’ve been told,” Nina Clooney said. “How marvelous! My husband and I are extremely excited.” The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.