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    As he dashed through the Middle East and Europe, Donald Trump looked like a conventional American leader abroad. He solemnly laid a wreath at a Holocaust memorial in Jerusalem, had an audience with the pope at the Vatican and stood center stage with Western allies at the annual summits that dominate the diplomatic calendar. But when Trump spoke, he sounded like anything but a typical U.S. president. On his first overseas tour, the new president made no attempt to publicly promote democracy and human rights in Saudi Arabia, instead declaring that he wasn't there to lecture. In Israel and the West Bank, he pointedly did not back America's long-standing support for a two-state solution to the intractable peace process. And in the heart of Europe, Trump berated NATO allies over their financial commitments and would not explicitly endorse the 'one for all, all for one' defense doctrine that has been the cornerstone of trans-Atlantic security for decades. To the White House, Trump's first trip abroad was an embodiment of the promises he made as a candidate to put America's interests first and break through the guardrails that have long defined U.S. foreign policy. Trump advisers repeatedly described the trip as historic and groundbreaking, including one senior official who brashly said without evidence that Trump had 'united the entire Muslim world.' Addressing U.S. troops Saturday at a Sicilian air base moments before departing for Washington, Trump himself declared: 'I think we hit a home run.' Trump boarded Air Force One without having held a single news conference on the trip — a break in presidential precedent that allowed him to avoid facing tough questions about his foreign policy or the raging controversies involving the investigations into his campaign's possible ties to Russia. Instead, the White House hoped to let the images of Trump in statesman-like settings tell the story of his first trip abroad, and perhaps ease questions about his preparedness for the delicate world of international diplomacy. Yet those questions are sure to persist, particularly given Trump's remarkable lashing of NATO allies in Brussels. Standing alongside his counterparts, the president effectively accused countries who do not meet NATO's goal of spending 2 percent of their gross domestic product of sponging off American taxpayers. He left some allies, already nervous about Russia's saber-rattling and Trump's public affection for Russian President Vladimir Putin, further flummoxed when he ended his remarks without making an explicit statement of support for Article 5, the common defense clause that underpins the 68-year-old military alliance. 'The mood of Article 5, the idea that we are all in this together, is not the mood he conveyed,' said Jon Alterman, a senior vice president at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. 'The mood he conveyed is you guys are a bunch of freeloaders.' Some European leaders believe Trump can still be coaxed away from his controversial campaign positions. At the Group of 7 summit in the coastal town of Taormina, leaders launched an aggressive, behind-the-scenes campaign to get him to stay in the Paris climate accord. While Trump emerged from the summit without a final decision on the Paris pact, he declared in a tweet Saturday that he will make a final decision next week. Trump's return home also shifts attention back to the storm clouds of scandal hovering over the White House. In a briefing with reporters Saturday, White House officials shifted uncomfortably and refused to comment when asked about reports that Jared Kushner, Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, tried to set up secret communications with Russia after the election. Trump's nine-day, five-stop international tour resulted in few tangible policy achievements. The U.S. inked a $110 billion arms sale to Saudi Arabia and unveiled numerous business commitments in the region, though the White House never provided specific details about the scope of the agreements. At NATO, the White House touted the alliance's commitment to boosting defense spending, though the resolution was essentially a continuation of a pact agreed to two years earlier. Still, the trip offered the clearest picture to date of how Trump plans to put his imprint on America's relationship with the world. From the start, he set a new direction. Instead of following presidential tradition by making his international debut in a neighboring democracy like Canada or Mexico, Trump flew to Saudi Arabia, the repressive desert kingdom. He appeared particularly comfortable in the setting. In Riyadh, he received a lavish, gold-plated welcome: His image was projected across the facade of the luxury hotel where he stayed, horses flanked his motorcade as it moved to one of the king's desert palaces and an extravagant celebration was held in his honor, complete with a traditional Saudi sword dance. Trump betrayed no awkwardness at relishing the warm embrace of one of the world's most oppressive governments. Instead, he reciprocated with a pledge to not publicly chastise the ruling royal family for its crackdown on political dissent. 'We are not here to lecture — we are not here to tell other people how to live, what to do, who to be, or how to worship,' Trump said. Trump was lavishly feted in Israel as well, embraced by a prime minister who despised his predecessor and was eager to flatter the new president. Trump received multiple standing ovations — one of his favorite measures of success — during a speech on U.S. relations with Israel. The photo of his solemn visit to the Western Wall was splashed across the front pages of Israel's newspapers. Like many of his predecessors, Trump made a personal appeal for peace between Israelis and Palestinians. But he never uttered the words 'two-state solution,' the longtime U.S. policy plan that would create a separate homeland for Palestinians. He also made no mention of new Jewish settlements in the West Bank, a major point of contention for the Palestinians. The smaller moments of the president's trip were endlessly dissected as well, from first lady Melania Trump's apparent reluctance to hold her husband's hand on occasion to his shoving aside of Montenegro's prime minister to get to the front of a pack of leaders at a NATO photo opportunity. At the G-7, it was Trump's interactions with other leaders that commanded attention. The six other heads of state took a short walk from one event to the next, chatting convivially as they strolled through the narrow Sicilian streets. Trump hung back, deciding against joining his peers. Instead, he got in a golf cart and the American president's mini-motorcade drove the route alone, Trump once more having charted his own course. ___ Follow Julie Pace at http://twitter.com/jpaceDC and Jonathan Lemire at http://twitter.com/jonlemire
  • Spain's maritime rescue service has saved 157 migrants from five small boats attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea. The service completed five different rescue missions in waters east of the Strait of Gibraltar to reach the small craft from late Friday through until Saturday evening. The service said that it reached the first boat carrying 27 men and six women late on Friday after it was sighted by a Spanish military plane. Another rescue boat intervened early Saturday to pull five men from a second boat. A third craft in danger of sinking with 35 men aboard was then spotted by a Spanish navy outpost on the Alboran Island between Spain and Morocco. The Spanish military helped the boat dock on the island, where the migrants were picked up by the rescue service. A fourth boat with 30 men and two women was located after the service received an alert from Moroccan authorities. The fifth boat bearing 42 men and 10 women was spotted by a Spanish navy vessel, which guided the rescue service to its whereabouts. Each year, tens of thousands of migrants and refugees set off from North Africa across the Mediterranean Sea, seeking a better life in Europe. Thousands die after setting sail in overloaded smugglers' boats or tiny dinghies that are unfit for the open sea.
  • Iran's Supreme Leader has said that Saudi Arabia is a 'cow being milked' by the United States. A Saturday report by the semi-official Fars news agency quotes Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei as saying that Saudi Arabia trades its wealth with 'pagans and enemies.' 'The stupid Saudi government thinks it can attract the friendship of enemies by giving them money,' said Khamenei. Khamenei added that bastion of Islam Saudi Arabia is 'cruel toward believers and kind toward pagans.' President Donald Trump signed a $110 billion weapons deal with Saudi Arabia during his visit to kingdom last week. Majority Shiite Iran and predominantly Sunni Saudi Arabia support opposite sites in the conflicts in Syria, Yemen and elsewhere in the Middle East.
  • With a shot to the chest, Alejandro Caro fell from his motorbike while on patrol in a small town in northern Colombia, another victim of criminal gangs who have killed 11 officers over the past month, mostly in gang-dominated regions. Caro's mother, Consolacion Jabe, is still stunned by his death. She said the youth had always dreamed of being a policeman and even after being injured earlier, he 'survived and kept fighting for his country. ... Now he is definitely gone.' Colombia's largest illegal organization, the Gulf Clan, has distributed leaflets that call for killing police, and police intelligence officials say the gang members are offering would-be assassins up to $600 per death — nearly triple the nation's monthly minimum wage. Authorities compare the killings to Pablo Escobar's 'pistol plan,' a strategy the drug kingpin devised in his final years to target officers. Hundreds of policemen were killed in the city of Medellin alone before Escobar was gunned down there in 1993 Some see the killings as a response to a crackdown that has reduced the Gulf Clan's ranks to about 1,500 members — half the number it had in 2010, according to the Defense Ministry. Authorities say they have captured 500 Gulf Clan members this year alone, though the group's leader, Dairo Antonio Usuga, remains at large. 'In Colombia, every time a criminal group turns to killing police, they do it as a desperate measure,' said Vice President Oscar Naranjo, who battled the nation's drug cartels as national police chief. The rash of shootings has taken place in pockets around the nation but is concentrated largely in the north and along the border with Panama, a region with a long history of drug trafficking. Most of the 11 were shot while on patrol. In response, the military is sending troops to accompany police. Officers are also being encouraged to arrive to work in plainclothes, wear bulletproof vests and travel in pairs. The killings come at a time of flux in Colombia's drug war. Coca production in the country surged 18 percent last year to levels unseen in nearly two decades of U.S. eradication efforts, according to a White House report. Authorities have set a goal of destroying 100,000 hectares of coca crops this year through a combination of manual eradication and voluntary crop substitution agreements with farmers. Meanwhile, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, the nation's largest rebel group, is abandoning territories it long controlled, a withdrawal that is part of a peace accord reached with the government last year. Criminal gangs and some breakaway guerrillas are now battling for control over those territories and the drug routes they once dominated. The Gulf Clan has extended its reach into 70 towns previously controlled by the FARC, according to Jorge Restrepo, director of the Conflict Analysis Resource Center, a Bogota-based think tank. Restrepo said the Gulf Clan may well be targeting officers to intimidate authorities, ensure the smooth passage of coca out of the country and create an escape route for drug kingpins. 'Unlike what we have seen in the past, these groups don't have defined political objectives,' Restrepo said. For the widows of officers, the campaign of death has wiped away any trace of benefits that the peace accord might bring. Jennifer Macias, 30, said her husband's boss came unexpectedly one morning this month to tell her Wilber Munoz had been shot and killed in the mining town of Segovia, weeks after celebrating his 35th birthday. 'Look how everything is,' she said. 'The peace is useless.' ___ Associated Press writer Cesar Garcia contributed to this report.
  • Iran's President Hassan Rouhani has told the Qatari Emir that Tehran is ready for talks with Arab nations to reach a 'real agreement toward peace and brotherhood.' Rouhani's website quoted him as saying in a phone conversation with Qatar's ruler, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, that the Muslim world is beset by divisions and should take steps 'toward peace and brotherhood.' 'In this direction we are ready for talks aimed at reaching a real agreement,' Rouhani was quoted as saying. The report added that the Qatari Emir said in response that talks between Iran and the Arab states of the Persian Gulf should continue. Majority Shiite Iran and predominantly Sunni Saudi Arabia and the UAE supporting opposite sites in the conflicts in Syria, Yemen and elsewhere in the Middle East.
  • The Latest on Group of Seven summit (all times local): 8:40 p.m. A stand-off between Italian riot police and protesters during which police used tear gas has ended without further incident. The tensions took place when anarchists, communists and other anti-global protesters held a demonstration after the Group of Seven summit in Taormina, Sicily. The protest took place in Giardini Naxos, a seaside town near Taormina, where the leaders had met for two days. The leaders had left before the protest began. ___ 6:40 p.m. Italian police have used tear gas against anarchists, communists and other anti-global protesters after the Group of Seven summit in Sicily. A stand-off is underway between Italian riot police and the protesters on Saturday evening in Giardini Naxos, a seaside town down the hill from Taormina, where leaders of seven large industrialized democracies had gathered for a two-day summit. The leaders had all left before the protest began. Many of the protesters carried flags or wore bandanas over their faces with the hammer and sickle symbol, a communist symbol. ___ 5:10 p.m. After a two-day summit in Italy, French President Emmanuel Macron had warm words for Donald Trump, despite the fact the U.S. president did not join in with other Group of Seven nations in supporting the Paris accord on fighting global warming. Macron praised Trump's 'capacity to listen' and said 'I found someone who is open and willing to deal well with us.' The new French president, a centrist, told reporters that 'I saw a leader with strong opinions on a number of subjects, which I share in part — the fight against terrorism, the willingness to keep our place in the family of nations — and with whom I have disagreements that we spoke about very calmly. I saw someone who listens and who is willing to work.' Macron said he told Trump that is 'indispensable for the reputation of the United States and the interest of the Americans themselves that the United States remain committed' to the Paris agreement. Marcon and Trump were both attending a G-7 summit for the first time. Macron won the French presidency on May 7. ___ 4:35 p.m. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says the G-7 agreed to step up pressure on North Korea, including sanctions. He told reporters it was the first time that the G-7 had recognized the North Korean threat as a priority issue. He says 'the threat has entered a new stage' as North Korea tests missiles and nuclear weapons. Abe adds, 'there is a danger it can spread like a contagious disease.' ___ 4:25 p.m. President Donald Trump's top economic adviser, Gary Cohn, says the other G-7 leaders respect the U.S. position that more time is needed for Trump to make a final decision on whether to stay in the Paris climate accord. Trump tweeted Saturday that he'll make a decision next week. Cohn told reporters: 'They understand where we are, we understand where they are and it's most important that we continue to work together.' Cohn describes the conversation among the leaders was 'very robust' and said there was a 'lot of give and take.' ___ 4:15 p.m. Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni says differences of opinion with President Donald Trump 'emerged quite clearly in our discussion' at the G-7 summit. Gentiloni says: 'Discussing is always useful. I think that all of the leaders present, starting with President Trump, appreciated the informality with which one in this format ... can discuss things calmly and freely.' He notes that the American people chose Trump and adds, 'so we are coming to terms with this choice.' ___ 4:05 p.m. French President Emmanuel Macron praised President Donald Trump's 'capacity to listen' and his 'intention to progress with us.' Macron hailed this as 'one of the true outcomes of this G-7.' Macron said he told Trump it is 'indispensable for the reputation of the United States and the interest of the Americans themselves that the United States remain committed' to the Paris agreement. The French leader says he believes the arguments made by the six other members enabled Trump to understand the importance of that issue and the necessity the Paris agreement for the U.S. economy. ___ 3:50 p.m. Alden Meyer, the director of strategy and policy for the Union of Concerned Scientists, an advocacy group in Washington, said the discord over climate change was unusual for G-7 meetings. He says: 'There have been differences, to be sure, in some past summits, but not a sharp open split like this.' Meyer said many U.S. states, cities, and companies are moving forward on climate action while the Trump administration is 'waffling' on the Paris Agreement. He says: 'President Trump should join these leaders in protecting Americans from the mounting impacts of climate change and reaping the economic benefits of the clean energy revolution, rather than trying to shore up the flagging fortunes of the polluting coal and oil industries.' ___ 3:25 p.m. A summit of the leaders of the world's wealthiest democracies has ended without a unanimous agreement on climate change, as the Trump administration plans to take more time to say whether the U.S. is going to remain in the Paris climate deal. The other six powers in the Group of Seven have agreed to stick with their previous commitment to implement that Paris deal to rein in greenhouse gases to fight climate change. The final G-7 statement expresses 'understanding' for the U.S. review process. The G-7 leaders also cut a compromise deal to acknowledge Trump's stance on trade. They kept the ban on protectionism from previous G-7 statements, but included a statement Saturday that they will 'stand firm against all unfair trade practices.' Climate and trade were sticking points at the two-day summit in Taormina, Sicily. The leaders found agreement on other points, such as backing closer cooperation against terrorism in the wake of the concert bombing in Manchester that killed 22 people. ___ 3:05 p.m. German Chancellor Angela Merkel says G-7 talks on climate change were 'unsatisfactory.' Six of the countries agreed to support the Paris climate change agreement; Trump tweeted he will decide next week. Merkel says the seven wealthy democracies meeting at a summit in Sicily have had a 'reasonable' discussion on trade and have agreed to reject protectionism. The agreement keeps a provision from early meetings in the face of a new approach from President Donald Trump, who has insisted trade must be fair as well as free. Merkel said the leaders agreed to 'act against protectionism.' ___ 2:30 p.m. President Donald Trump says he'll make a final decision next week on whether the U.S. will stay in the Paris climate agreement. Trump made the surprise announcement in a tweet after resisting pressure from European leaders to stay in the agreement. Nearly every nation that signed the 2015 agreement, including the six other G-7 members, has agreed to curb greenhouse gas emissions. The president tweeted Saturday, 'I will make my final decision on the Paris Accord next week!' Trump's pending review of U.S. climate policies has left environmentalists bracing for the possibility of bland G-7 promises that say little after years of increasingly stronger commitments to reduce reliance on fossil fuels and cut greenhouse gas emissions. Trump once proclaimed global warming a Chinese hoax. ___ 1:10 p.m. Shop owners in a Sicilian town have covered their windows with sheet metal and cardboard ahead of a protest expected to take place on the sidelines of a Group of Seven meeting. Several thousand people are expected to march through Giardini Naxos, the seaside town bordering Taormina, the hill top venue of the G7. The march was organized by unions protesting economic inequality, current migration policies and demanding lower military spending. The march is set for Saturday afternoon, as leaders of the world's seven largest democratic economies wrap up their two-day summit. The protests are expected to be peaceful, but the shop owners say they are mindful of violence that has taken place during past G-7 meetings. Marcello Di Giuseppe, said he just wants to be prepared, because 'if there will be damages who will compensate me.' ___ 11:55 a.m. Seven wealthy democracies have reached a deal at their annual summit to give the Trump administration time to tell them whether the United States plans to stay in the Paris climate agreement. A person familiar with the talks said six members of the Group of Seven would stick with their endorsement of the Paris deal, and await a decision from the U.S. The person spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the matter before the formal announcement. The source adds that G-7 members were still wrestling over a statement on trade and whether it would condemn protectionism, as previous group statements have. The last G-7 meeting in Ise-Shima, Japan in 2016 agreed to 'fight all forms of protectionism,' or the use of import taxes and regulations to favor domestic producers over imports.
  • Pope Francis prayed Saturday for the Coptic Christians killed a day earlier in Egypt by Islamic extremists, saying that there are more Christian martyrs today than in ancient times. During a meeting with clergy in the Italian port city of Genoa, Francis urged them to pray 'for our brothers the Egyptian Copts, who were killed because they did not want to renounce their faith.' 'Let's not forget that today there are more Christian martyrs than in ancient times, than in the early day times of the church,' Francis told bishops, priests and nuns gathered in the Cathedral of San Lorenzo. Twenty-nine people died in the attack Friday on Christians traveling to a monastery south of Cairo. The attack, which took place on the eve of the holy Muslim month of Ramadan, was the fourth to target Egypt's Christian minority since December. The Egyptian Cabinet says 13 victims wounded in the attack remain hospitalized. Egypt's President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi blamed the attack on suspected Islamic State group extremists in Libya. After Francis visited Egypt last month, IS vowed to escalate attacks against Christians and urged Muslims to steer clear of Christian gatherings and Western embassies.
  • Great Britain lowered its security threat level from “critical” to “severe” on Saturday, Prime Minister Theresa May said. >> Read more trending news Earlier, police hunting a suspected network behind Salman Abedi, the bomber who killed 22 people on Monday night during a concert in Manchester, said they had made two further arrests overnight as they closed in on other possible cell members, Reuters reported.  As a result, soldiers who have been assisting police would be withdrawn from Britain's streets at midnight on Monday. 'A significant amount of police activity has taken place over the last 24 hours and there are now 11 suspects in custody,' May said. May cautioned, however, that the lesser threat is still a dangerous one. 'The public should be clear about what this means. A threat level of severe means an attack is highly likely,” she said. “The country should remain vigilant.' The threat assessment has returned to the level it was at prior to the Manchester attack. In Manchester, events planned around the spring bank holiday will go ahead with additional security, including a significant number of armed officers, police said. British officers do not usually carry guns, CNN reported. Events include the Manchester Games, the Great Manchester Run, and a stadium show by bands including The Courteeners, all of which are likely to attract big crowds. This weekend also marks the start of Ramadan, the holiest month of the Muslim calendar, CNN reported.    
  • Dozens of Greek and Turkish Cypriots have linked arms across a U.N.-controlled buffer zone cutting across ethnically divided Cyprus' capital of Nicosia to voice their support for a reunification agreement. Beating drums, blowing whistles and singing traditional Cypriot folk songs, the demonstrators said real peace lies in the hands of ordinary people from both sides of the divide as the Mediterranean island's reunification talks appear to be faltering. Protesters said Saturday's event was to remind politicians not to let ordinary people down. On Friday, a U.N. envoy called off meditation efforts with the island's Greek Cypriot President Nicos Anastasiades and Turkish Cypriot leader Mustafa Akinci after failing to find 'common ground' on convening a final summit for an overall reunification deal. But officials insisted talks haven't collapsed.
  • The Latest on British Airways flight stalled by IT failure (all times local): 4:40 p.m. British Airways says it is canceling all of its flights from London's Heathrow and Gatwick airports for the rest of the day because of a 'major IT system failure.' BA has not said what is causing the computer problem, but says it has no evidence of a cyberattack. The airline had earlier suspended flights up to 6 p.m. (1700 GMT) because the two airports had become severely congested. The global computer failure has caused misery for tens of thousands of travelers on a key holiday weekend in Britain. Both airports — major hubs for worldwide travel — are overflowing with stranded, frustrated passengers. Passengers at Heathrow reported long lines at check-in counters and the failure of the airline's website and mobile app. BA says the problems have also affected call centers. BA says it's working to restore services beginning Sunday, although there will still be some disruption. It says it expects London-bound flights to land on schedule on Sunday. ___ 1:20 p.m. British Airways has canceled all flights from London's Heathrow and Gatwick airports as a global IT failure causes severe disruption for travelers. The airline says it has suffered a 'major IT systems failure.' BA says terminals at Heathrow and Gatwick have become extremely congested and it is cancelling all flights from the airports until 6 p.m. (1700GMT). It is urging passengers not to go to the airports. Earlier, passengers at Heathrow reported long lines at check-in counters and flight delays. BA has not said what is causing the computer problem, but says it is working to resolve it as quickly as possible. ___ 12:10 p.m. Air travelers faced delays Saturday because of a worldwide computer systems failure at British Airways, the airline said. BA apologized in a statement for what it called an 'IT systems outage' and said it was working to resolve the problem. It said in a tweet that the problem is global. Passengers at Heathrow Airport reported long lines at check-in counters and flight delays. One posted a picture on Twitter of BA staff writing gate numbers on a white board. 'We've tried all of the self-check-in machines. None were working, apart from one,' said Terry Page, booked on a flight to Texas. 'There was a huge queue for it and it later transpired that it didn't actually work, but you didn't discover that until you got to the front.' The problem comes on a holiday weekend, when thousands of Britons are travelling.

News

  • Great Britain lowered its security threat level from “critical” to “severe” on Saturday, Prime Minister Theresa May said. >> Read more trending news Earlier, police hunting a suspected network behind Salman Abedi, the bomber who killed 22 people on Monday night during a concert in Manchester, said they had made two further arrests overnight as they closed in on other possible cell members, Reuters reported.  As a result, soldiers who have been assisting police would be withdrawn from Britain's streets at midnight on Monday. 'A significant amount of police activity has taken place over the last 24 hours and there are now 11 suspects in custody,' May said. May cautioned, however, that the lesser threat is still a dangerous one. 'The public should be clear about what this means. A threat level of severe means an attack is highly likely,” she said. “The country should remain vigilant.' The threat assessment has returned to the level it was at prior to the Manchester attack. In Manchester, events planned around the spring bank holiday will go ahead with additional security, including a significant number of armed officers, police said. British officers do not usually carry guns, CNN reported. Events include the Manchester Games, the Great Manchester Run, and a stadium show by bands including The Courteeners, all of which are likely to attract big crowds. This weekend also marks the start of Ramadan, the holiest month of the Muslim calendar, CNN reported.    
  • A Cobb County mother was jailed after her 5-year-old son said she beat him with a belt and a broom, hit him in the head and stomped on his stomach. Nakeisha Lashay Logan of Mableton faces first-degree child cruelty, battery and family violence charges in connection with an alleged May 17 attack. The boy, whose name was not released because he is a juvenile victim, said during a forensic interview that he tried to hide under the bed to avoid the “terrible” beating but Logan beat him with a broom and threw a box of toys at him, a magistrate court warrant states. RELATED: ‘I’m going to rape you’ man allegedly tells mother in front of kid Mom, friend jailed after child suffers broken bones, electrical burns Babysitter charged after 5-month-old breaks 4 bones After the box of toys hit the child in the shoulder, Logan grabbed his head and smashed it repeatedly on the floor, according to the warrant.  The warrant adds that Logan stomped on the child's stomach, making him feel nauseous.  The warrant doesn’t state who called police, but by the time an officer arrived the boy’s bleeding cheek had scabbed. His face was still red and swollen, Officer Sydney Tschappat wrote. Police took the boy to a nearby hospital and arrested Logan. She was being held in the Cobb County Adult Detention Center on a $50,000 bond. In other news:
  • Police say a metro Atlanta couple locked the woman's 86-year-old mother in her room and used furniture to block the door closed. Katie Son and her husband are both charged with cruelty to an elderly person. Officers say 86-year-old Bong Le managed to escape out a front window. She was found a couple of blocks away, wrapped in a blanket and sitting under a tree. Investigators say she smelled like urine and feces. Her daughter and son-in-law, who are now out on bond, told Channel 2's Tony Thomas that they were just trying to protect her from herself. 'Did you lock your mom up?' Thomas asked. 'No. No sir,' Son replied. Gwinnett police say they found tables, chairs and other items stacked high against the door of the downstairs bedroom in the home. 'It looked quite unusual,' Cpl. Michele Pihera said. But Son said it was all to keep her mother safe. She said when she and her husband went to work each day at a Hall County nail salon, her mother couldn't be trusted alone in the house. 'They told our officers that the reason they had stacked up the furniture was to prevent the mother from going into the kitchen to access the stove or access any kitchen utensils,' Pihera said. TRENDING STORIES: Police search for teens accused of setting off fireworks inside grocery store Watch your step! Snakebites on the rise World falling in love with Georgia father's letter to Ariana Grande Deputies still have questions. 'It's very possible they were trying to prevent her from getting into the food or any kind of items to eat,' Pihera said. She says the state of the room was disturbing. 'They found human feces and what looked like human urine that looked like it had been smeared into the carpet or never even cleaned up,' she said. She said that, combined with the furniture, led to the arrests. 'You combine the lack of access to food and water and the living conditions and that's what led our detectives to take out warrants for their arrests,' Pihera said. Neighbors didn't want to talk about what happened, but said they recognized Le as the woman who didn't really have a memory and would get lost easily. She's now in the hospital. Her daughter and son-in-law have been ordered not to go near her.
  • Toni Rosenberg has spent the past week chatting non-stop with her half-sister, Florence Serino, 82. After all, they have decades worth of memories to catch up on. The two met for the first time May 16 at a crowded airport gate in Fort Lauderdale. Rosenberg, a Boca Raton resident who was given away as a newborn in a secretive “black market” adoption, tracked down Serino just last year. “We both have big mouths,” Serino, who lives in Irvine, California, said with a laugh. The two have spent the past week shopping, eating and sharing memories, stories and photos of two families that, despite living on opposite sides of the country, are inextricably connected. Rosenberg even learned that she had biological cousins living just miles from her in Boca Raton, she said. Serino introduced them. “It’s crazy to think I had family right there,” said Rosenberg, the only child of her adoptive parents. >> Read more trending news The sisters have spent hours looking at old family photos, including ones of the pair’s biological mother Ilene Gallagher, which Serino brought with her from California. “If you saw my mother walking down the street, you’d say immediately, ‘She must be related to Toni,’ ” Rosenberg said of her resemblance to Gallagher. The union has brought immeasurable joy to Rosenberg and her family and friends, Rosenberg said. But a sadness still lingers. Serino plans to fly back to California on Tuesday. “All this time has gone by and we could’ve shared children and grandchildren,” Rosenberg said. “We could’ve had more years ahead of us.” The sisters aren’t sure if they’ll meet again in person. A 2,200-mile flight is a financial and health strain on most, let alone on two elderly retirees. “It’s kind of hard to think far ahead,” Rosenberg said, adding that they’re strategically packing half-a-century’s worth of conversations into a two-week visit. “How much time does God give us?”Read more about the sister's journeys to meet one another here.
  • The Hall County Sheriff's Office says they are investigating the discovery of a body floating in Lake Lanier just south of Don Carter State Park. Deputies say they body has likely been in the water for more than a day. The victim is that of a white man, possibly in his 30s. Authorities are working to ID the man. They said there is no obvious signs of trauma. We have a crew headed to the scene and will have the latest on this developing story on WSBTV.com and on Channel 2 Action News at 6:00.
  • Police say the drowning a 3-year-old in a swimming pool Saturday afternoon is likely a 'tragic accident.' Emergency responders were called out around 1 p.m. to a home along Waterford Drive in Cartersville where a child had been found unconscious, unresponsive and not breathing in the family's pool. Bartow County EMS says 3-year old child drowned at this home's private pool in Cartersville. pic.twitter.com/D4Amic1MzH-- Chris Jose (@ChrisJoseWSB) May 27, 2017 Family members were doing CPR on the little girl when emergency responders arrived at the home. They took over from there. TRENDING STORIES: Witness: Officer fatally shoots man breaking up fight at Sweet 16 party Georgia soldier killed in overseas crash Child killed, another injured in crash The child was taken to Cartersville Medical Center where she was pronounced dead. The Cartersville Police Department said the investigation is ongoing.