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Woman finds 4 foot long snake living in her couch

​So, this story is crazy enough — a woman in Michigan found a 4-foot-long snake living in her couch. But even crazier...

“It’s been living in the couch for like two months in my bedroom. ... Sometimes my dog would sleep there. I would sit and check email, have a cup of coffee. I read a couple novels on this couch.” (Via ABC)

Yes -- the snake was living in the couch for two months, and Holly Wright had no idea what was right underneath her.

Wright got the couch off the street for free. She checked it for damage, odor and stains -- even cleaned it, and never saw the snake. Over the weekend, it came out — Wright removed it with a coat hanger. (Via WZZM)

Wright thinks it emerged because it was sick. She said it seemed lethargic, and actually, the snake died before she could get it any help. Wright was saddened -- saying such a beautiful creature should’ve been better cared for.

Some outlets are reporting the snake was a boa constrictor, others that it was a python. Either way, it’s unclear how exactly the snake got in the couch. (WBAYKSDK)

- See more at newsy.com

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