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Police re-release rapist's photo to identify victims

A horrifying discovery was made inside the Georgia home of a serial rapist.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation found 56, 8-millimeter tapes showing Matthew Coniglio attacking girls who appear to be drugged to the point of unconsciousness.  The tapes were found in a bedside table that was turned around to hide the location of the tapes.

Agents say not all the faces of the victims are clear, but there is no doubt the man is Coniglio. He even looks right into the camera and speaks during some of the attacks. The FBI is re-releasing his picture in hopes that victims will come forward and get the help they need.

Marlyne Israelian is a forensic psychologist here in Atlanta. She says while the victims may not remember the actual attack they may recognize his face. She says memory is altered by drugs and trauma, but the victims might be able to recognize Coniglio's face.

"Their ability to recognize his face may be intact even in the absence of any memory for the sequence of events because facial recognition and declarative (or memory for the event) is processed in different areas of the brain. While trauma and drugs can disrupt declarative memory, facial recognition is less vulnerable to the effects of drugs and traumatic events," says Israelian. 

It is not clear how many victims there may be, due to the amount of evidence. Some of the victims appeared to have been as young as 8 or 10 years old. Coniglio was a traveling salesman who worked in Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina, so his reach extends beyond his residence.

He was arrested on child pornography charges on Aril 10th at his home in Georgia, and then hanged himself on April 20th in an apparent suicide while behind bars after writing letters to his parents.

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