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Opinion Blogs
Republicans aren't perfect, but they would never pull crap like this
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Republicans aren't perfect, but they would never pull crap like this

Republicans aren't perfect, but they would never pull crap like this
Photo Credit: Roman Barelko
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Republicans aren't perfect, but they would never pull crap like this

Rampage.

The Obama administration and the Democrats are on an unconstitutional, intimidation, deception rampage! It isn't slight either. It's an arrogant in-your-face rampage while too many gullible people take it with applause and a smile, and some even try to defend it.

I am not saying that Republicans as a group have a stellar record of doing what needs to be done. There are exceptions and some Republicans in Congress are trying to stick to their principles even at the expense of harsh criticism from within their own party. But there are some things a Republican administration and Republican-controlled Congress just would not do because of basic integrity and principles – not to mention the brutal crucifixion by the mainstream media, which would be relentless.

Let's start with the most obvious and blatant example. Namely, the Democrats consistently lied about ObamaCare in order to get the legislation passed. They lied to the American people, and they lied to fellow Democrats in the House to get them to vote for the unpopular Senate-passed bill.

Many Democrats who voted for the Senate version of the bill "took one for the team" and were defeated in their next election, and had to find another job. I wonder, where are they now?

The Obama Administration has delayed or changed parts of the president's signature law 27 times and counting. This is not implementation tweaking as some would argue. This is rewriting the law to try and make it more palatable for a public that does not want it. ObamaCare was the complete uprooting of a health care system that mostly worked in favor of one that has been a fiasco from the day it was implemented. It was like performing brain surgery on a patient that only needed a couple of aspirin. We wouldn’t have even needed to call anybody in the morning.

As ObamaCare continues to implode at the expense of the American people, the Democrats continue to make changes, make excuses, and spin the narrative in the media to convince people that they are being rained on instead of being ...... on. You fill in the blank. 

When the Congressional Budget Office issued a report recently that said ObamaCare would be a disincentive for people to work, and cause some workers to see their hours cut or lose their jobs altogether, the Democrats (Jay Carney, Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi et al) said that was a good thing!

It's a family value! It could free people from working in jobs they didn't like since they could now get plenty of ObamaCare subsidies to have health insurance! Call me naive, but what about food, shelter and clothing?

Are some people really that blind to the truth? I guess that's a yes!

Next: "There isn't a smidgen of corruption at the IRS." That’s what President Obama told Bill O'Reilly in a Super Bowl Sunday interview. What a super ... ! You fill in the blank. Just ask the Tea Party groups, or anyone who has been the target of an IRS audit. I have and it ain't fair or pretty. 

This next example is beyond outrageous. The Obama Administration wants businesses that are cutting jobs because of ObamaCare to certify on their tax returns that it is not because of ObamaCare. So, if you cut jobs to stay in business you can't blame it on ObamaCare. If it is because of ObamaCare, don't say so or the IRS will come after you. If that's not intimidation using the IRS, then Santa Claus is real, and he's black.

Next, how about the "global warming" lie? It was recently revealed that some scientist had conspired to falsify data to show that the earth's climate was heating up at an unprecedented rate. Not! But the Democrats are still singing that narrative. Most recently, John Podesta, representing the Obama Administration, is working with the United Nations on an international commitment to halt the "alarming pace of climate change" - without congressional approval.

Next, the more Republicans scream for spending restraints (though not as drastic as us working class peasants would like to see), the more President Obama and the Democrats demand no constraints or conditions. The most recent example is the recently passed debt ceiling bill with no conditions. They got away with it because they knew if the Republicans had put up a fight, they could tell the mainstream media that the Republicans wanted ua to renege on our debt obligations as a nation and the MSM would have played the story note for note like singing lap dogs.

Next, Republican Senator Rand Paul is now suing President Obama for violating the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution. The Courts will decide, but when in modern times has a Democrat in Congress been so compelled to sue a sitting Republican president for violating the Constitution? I can't think of one.

Lastly for now, the propaganda about unemployment and the economy. The administration fudged the unemployment calculations leading up to the November 2012 elections. If you look at the survey data used, which I and other sources did, one can see an unexplainably large increase in those who said they are working. The Bureau of Labor Statistics ignored the finding, just as they ignore the shrinking labor participation rate, both of which demonstrate the reported unemployment rate to be bogus.

The economy is supposed to be in a recovery, but we are still nearly two million jobs short of where we were before the recession started five years ago. It must be Bush's fault. And you can't expect this president to propose real pro-growth economic policies through lower taxes and less regulations, he would be accused of being a Republican!

Lies, deception, distractions, and dishonesty about the facts sum up the Democrats' tactics to continue to exploit the gullible. We have not seen this in recent decades to this extent. And if Republicans ever do these kind of things when they control Congress and the White House, I will be the first to throw them under the proverbial bus.

I speak for the working class, not the political class.

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  • There is light at the end of the prolonged wet and/or cloudy spell we have been going through. As I’ve been advertising on the radio for a few days now a prolonged dry spell is expected to begin Sunday and last through next Thursday, with modest thunderstorm chances returning Friday and next weekend. By the way, from this long distance, 4th of July weather looks pretty typical for the Metro, very warm and humid with around a 30% chance of an afternoon or evening thunderstorm. But first things first. We are still in a warm very deep moist tropical air mass. And while we get to see some sun today and tomorrow, we are not done with rain just yet, nor the threat of an isolated severe storm or small, weak tornado. Listen for details on the weather today this weekend and next 5 days on the radio in my reports for updates. Or check wsbradio.com at Click on the MellishMeter on the WSB Radio homepage for my 5 day forecast in writing anytime on any digital device. Due to the tropical nature of the air in place, more heavy downpours are likely in spots late today and overnight into tomorrow and that’s on already saturated soils, so a FLASH FLOOD WATCH has been issued for all of Metro Atlanta north of Griffin. Take note that trees may fall in the wet root zones without new rain or without high wind. Also bear in mind that in tropical systems lightning and thunder is often at a minimum, even in storms capable of producing damaging straight line winds or a tornado, so you may get little or no warning. You can see what’s left of Tropical Storm Cindy and the approach of a front from the north. MID-DAY FRIDAY: FRIDAY END OF DAY: FRIDAY EVENING: SATURDAY AM: END OF DAY SATURDAY: SUNDAY MORNING: HIGHEST FLOODING RISK FRIDAY: Flash Flood Watch 2pm Friday-8pm Saturday FRIDAY SEVERE WEATHER RISK:   TORNADO WATCH UNTIL 9PM Atlanta time: The remnants of Cindy will push eastward, and interact with shear axis/weak convergence boundary through Saturday. This shear axis/weak convergence zone will slowly sag south across the metro area through Saturday, serving to focus areas of precipitation. As with any tropical system, the potential for severe weather will exist. Especially for isolated tornadoes within any rain-bands. Areas roughly along and west of the Interstate 85 corridor will have the best potential for any severe weather through tonight. However, if good heating occurs across southern areas today, an isolated severe thunderstorm is not out of the question there, too. End of day Friday predicted (simulated) radar from a couple models: A welcome change is headed our way in the long term as drier air moves into the region, with lower than normal temperatures continuing and lower than normal humidity moving in with a less than normal rain odds Sunday through next Thursday. FOLLOW ME ON TWITTER @MellishMeterWSB
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But Carter also gave the services until July 1 to develop policies to allow people already identifying as transgender to newly join the military, if they meet physical, medical and other standards, and have been stable in their identified genders for 18 months. The military chiefs had said they needed time to study the issue and its effects on the readiness of the force before taking that step. Officials said Friday that the chiefs believe the extra half-year would give the four military services time to gauge if currently serving transgender troops are facing problems and what necessary changes the military bases might have to make. The chiefs of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps discussed the matter with Deputy Defense Secretary Robert Work on Thursday, officials said. Dana White, the Pentagon's chief spokeswoman, said there have been ongoing discussions with the service chiefs and a recommendation is expected, but she declined to disclose any details. 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Ashley Tellis, an expert on South Asia at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, said the U.S. decision to offer the Guardian aircraft to India is significant as the U.S. has a standing policy of declining export of such advanced drones other than to allies involved in combined operations with U.S. forces. 'Much bureaucratic china within the U.S. government had to be broken to get to this decision,' he said. There could still be pushback from Congress. While there is bipartisan support for closer U.S.-India security ties, some lawmakers remain wary of the export of U.S. drone technology to non-allies. Modi, a Hindu nationalist, will be making his fourth visit to the U.S. since he took office in 2014. He forged a strong relationship with President Barack Obama, and on his last visit in June 2016, he addressed Congress and described the U.S. as an 'indispensable partner.' The visit is likely to be lower key and aimed at building a personal bond between the two leaders, who have spoken twice by phone since Trump took office. Modi will be the first foreign dignitary to be hosted for dinner at the White House during Trump's presidency. They share a populist streak and a knack for using social media, and are likely to find common ground on combating Islamic extremism. Modi will be urging a tougher stance on Pakistan over militants that India blames for attacks on its territory. But there could be increased strains on trade issues. India is among nations singled out by the Trump administration for their trade surpluses with the U.S., which in India's case totaled $30.8 billion in 2016. New Delhi is also closely watching the administration's review of the H1B visa program, under which thousands of skilled Indian workers come to the U.S. New Delhi was irked by Trump's decision to pull out of the Paris climate accord. 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  • Republicans in full control of government are on the brink of history-making changes to the nation's health care system. The impact for consumers would go well beyond 'Obamacare.' Former President Barack Obama's signature law is usually associated with subsidized insurance markets like HealthCare.gov. But the Affordable Care Act also expanded Medicaid. Not only would the GOP legislation scale back coverage through the insurance markets and phase out the Medicaid expansion, it would also make fundamental changes to the broader Medicaid program. The federal-state program covers low-income people, from newborns to elderly nursing home residents, from special-needs kids to young adults caught in the opioid epidemic. House Republicans have passed their health care bill, and Senate GOP leaders are driving toward a vote next week. President Donald Trump is waiting, eager to deliver on a campaign promise to repeal the law. Against fast-moving developments, a look at some major issues for consumers. WHY MEDICAID MATTERS As health care costs have kept climbing, employers cut back on coverage, and Medicaid passed Medicare as the nation's largest public insurance program. It now covers about 70 million people, including children and able-bodied adults mostly served by private managed care plans. The GOP's biggest Medicaid change involves limiting future federal financing. Since its inception, Medicaid has been an open-ended entitlement, with Washington matching a share of what each state spends. Instead, Republicans propose a per-beneficiary cap. In addition, the GOP would phase out added financing that Obama's law provided as an incentive for states to expand the program and cover more low-income adults. About 11 million are covered by the expansion. The Congressional Budget Office estimated the House bill would reduce federal Medicaid spending by $834 billion over 10 years, and the program would cover about 14 million fewer people by 2026, a 17 percent reduction. Governors of both parties have warned Congress that would mean a cost shift to states that undermines coverage for the vulnerable. Medicaid limits got very little attention in the 2016 presidential campaign. The idea was a relatively late addition to Trump's talking points. Indeed, candidate Trump had started out promising no cuts to Social Security, Medicare or Medicaid. Economist Douglas Holtz-Eakin, a longtime GOP adviser, says the Republican approach is '180 degrees different in its economic and budgetary philosophy,' from the course steered by Obama. The Medicaid limit would move the nation closer to putting public health care programs on a budget, fiscal discipline that conservatives say is long overdue. But the human consequences could be politically volatile. 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But doctors see a health insurance card as a ticket into the system, so patients can be screened for chronic conditions that can ultimately lead to serious illnesses. Obama's law made many preventive services free of charge to the patient. Dr. Mott Blair of Wallace, N.C., recalls a patient who got a colonoscopy that found a polyp, which undetected could have led to colon cancer. 'Now we are able to bring them in and get their blood sugars down, their blood pressure down,' Blair said in a recent interview. 'They're not going to have a disastrous complication like a stroke or a heart attack, at least not for the foreseeable future.' PRIVATE INSURANCE CHANGES Republicans would make no significant changes to employer-provided coverage, which remains the mainstay of private insurance. They focus instead on the market for individual policies, which Obama's ACA sought to reform by providing subsidies, setting requirements for comprehensive coverage, and creating online markets where consumers could compare plans. An estimated 17 million to 20 million people have individual policies. About 10 million are in the ACA's markets. 'Obamacare's' results have been mixed, with lower enrollment than expected, big losses for many insurers, and sharp premium increases. The situation varies from state to state, with healthy markets in some and others struggling to hang on to insurers. Consumers who are not entitled to subsidies can face shockingly high premiums. Both the House and Senate bills would keep subsidies for private insurance, although with considerably less money. The House and Senate formulas for subsidies differ. States would be able to seek waivers from federal insurance requirements. The Senate bill takes immediate steps to stabilize insurance markets for the next two years. Over the long run, premiums for younger people are expected to come down. But older adults and people who require comprehensive coverage are likely to pay more. 'Low-income people will end up paying higher premiums for plans that have bigger deductibles, compared to today,' said Larry Levitt of the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation, commenting on the Senate bill. 'Older people who are now getting premium subsidies would get substantially less help, but younger people would get more.