recent on-air advertisers

Now Playing

News/Talk WSB
Atlanta's breaking news, ...
Listen Live

Posted: 11:48 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017

Young Millennnials are the worst behaved drivers, AAA study says

New Law Seeks to Crack Down on Distracted New York Drivers
A driver uses a phone while behind the wheel of a car on April 30, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

By Susan Salisbury

Palm Beach Post

A new report from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety found that 88 percent of young millennials engaged in at least one risky behavior behind the wheel in the past 30 days, earning the top spot of worst behaved U.S. drivers.

>> Read more trending stories

These dangerous behaviors ― which increase crash risk ― included texting while driving, red-light running and speeding.

The findings released Wednesday came as U.S. traffic deaths rose to 35,092 in 2015, an increase of more than 7 percent, the largest single-year increase in five decades.

"Alarmingly, some of the drivers ages 19 to 24 believe that their dangerous driving behavior is acceptable," said David Yang, executive director of the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. "It's critical that these drivers understand the potentially deadly consequences of engaging in these types of behaviors and that they change their behavior and attitudes in order to reverse the growing number of fatalities on U.S. roads."

By rank and by age group, the percentage of drivers who reported engaging in speeding, red light running or texting behind the wheel in the past 30 days include:

  1. Drivers ages 19-24: 88.4 percent
  2. Drivers ages 25-39: 79.2 percent
  3. Drivers ages 40-59: 75.2 percent
  4. Drivers ages 16-18: 69.3 percent
  5. Drivers ages 75+: 69.1 percent
  6. Drivers ages 60-74: 67.3 percent

    Texting While Driving

    • Drivers ages 19 to 24 were 1.6 times as likely as all drivers to report having read a text message or e-mail while driving in the last 30 days (66.1 percent vs. 40.2 percent).
    • Drivers ages 19 to 24 were nearly twice as likely as all drivers to report having typed or sent a text message or e-mail while driving (59.3 percent vs. 31.4 percent).

    Speeding

    • Drivers ages 19 to 24 were 1.4 times as likely as all drivers to report having driven 10 mph over the speed limit on a residential street.
    • Nearly 12 percent of drivers ages 19 to 24 reported feeling that it is acceptable to drive 10 mph over the speed limit in a school zone, compared to less than 5 percent of all drivers.

    Red- Light Running

    • Nearly 50 percent of drivers ages 19 to 24 reported driving through a light that had just turned red when they could have stopped safely, compared to 36 percent of all drivers.
    • Nearly 14 percent of drivers ages 19 to 24 reported feeling that it is acceptable to drive through a light that just turned red, when they could have stopped safely, compared to about 6 percent of all drivers.

    The survey results are part of the AAA Foundation's annual Traffic Safety Culture Index, which identifies attitudes and behaviors related to traffic safety. The survey data are from a sample of 2,511 licensed drivers ages 16 and older who reported driving in the past 30 days.

    The AAA Foundation issued its first Traffic Safety Culture Index in 2008, and the latest report is online at www.AAAFoundation.org.

    There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. Sign in or register.