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Why today is the most depressing day of the year

Good morning — happy Monday! You're gonna want that — it's about to get depressing. 

Ever heard of Blue Monday? Well, it's today — January 6th. Reportedly the most depressing day of the year. Why? (Via Daily Mail)

Well, of course, the holidays are over. Goodbye, Christmas cheer (Via Warner Bros.)

But Blue Monday was first declared in 2005 by an academic who looked at weather conditions, debt levels, failed New Year's Resolutions and more. (Via WTXF)

"You're in debt. Your broken New Year resolutions. Everybody is back to work today — a lot of people worked over the period but everybody else is back." (Via ITV)

And now it's been revealed that a drinks company called Upbeat commissioned British researchers to look at tweets in the month of January for the past three years. 

And more than 2 million Tweets have proved that basically, we're all bummed. (Via Twitter)

They found, for example, tweets related to guilt were nearly five times higher than average on January 6th. That guilt is likely from those New Year's resolutions already failing. (Via TVNZ)

On a happiness index of zero to 100, Monday, January 6th scored a lousy 49. 

Oh, and, today is also known as Divorce Monday — reportedly the most popular day to file for divorce according to a British website that helps people file. So there's that. (Via Daily Express)

In case you were wondering, according to that same happiness index, the happiest days of the year are Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. (Via news.com.au)

Well, only 352 days until Christmas. Happy New Year.

- See more at Newsy.com

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  • Polk County Sheriff Johnny Moats isn’t naming names, but the six inmates who rescued an officer during a work detail last Friday will serve reduced sentences. Many of the six men who rushed to help the officer who’d passed out in the afternoon heat haven’t even been sentenced yet, Moats told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “If I’m in court when they go, I would stand up and let them know what they did,” Moats said. MORE: 6 inmates save officer who passed out during work detail After the officer collapsed, one of the inmates grabbed the man’s work phone and called 911, according to the sheriff's office. The inmates also took off the man’s outer carrier vest in an attempt to help cool him off.  Moats said prisoners in Polk County jail already earn two days time served for every day they spend in the county jail. Those who volunteer for work detail earn three days for every one. Moats said he would give these men credit for four days for every one served.  “I can’t do that if they are sentenced to prison,” Moats said. It’s what is traditionally called “time off for good behavior” and applied to any future sentence.   In other news:
  • The Latest on Senate Republicans' health care bill (all times local): 5:20 p.m. An addiction treatment advocacy group says the Senate health care plan falls short in confronting the opioid epidemic. Joseph J. Plumeri of the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse says the proposed cuts to Medicaid mean fewer people will receive treatment for addiction. He says anyone who supports the legislation 'cannot claim to be committed to ending the opioid epidemic.' The Senate bill would create a $2 billion fund to provide grants to states in support of substance abuse treatment and recovery, and also to help care for people with mental health problems. But advocates say the current financing provided through Medicaid is far greater — and open-ended. Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, had sought $45 billion over 10 years to combat the addiction crisis. __ 4:35 p.m. U.S. Capitol Police have arrested 43 people who were protesting proposed cuts to Medicaid inside a Senate office building. In a statement, Capitol Police say the protesters 'removed themselves from their wheelchairs and lay themselves on the floor, obstructing passage through the hallway and into nearby offices.' Some of the protesters were yelling 'no cuts to Medicaid' as they were being led away by police. The protest came on the same day Senate Republican leaders released their version of a bill that would repeal and replace President Barack Obama's health law. The bill limits Medicaid spending. Capitol Police say those arrested were charged with crowding, obstructing or incommoding, which means inconveniencing or disturbing others. __ 3:55 p.m. Former President Barack Obama says the Senate's GOP-written health care bill will cause millions of families to lose health care coverage. The former president issued a statement on his Facebook page as Senate Republicans unveiled a plan to dismantle Obama's signature presidential achievement. Obama called Senate Republicans' health care bill a 'massive transfer of wealth from middle-class and poor families to the richest people in America.' He also says it 'hands enormous tax cuts to the rich and to the drug and insurance industries, paid for by cutting health care for everybody else.' The former president says amending the GOP-written bill 'cannot change the fundamental meanness at the core of this legislation.' Obama says he hopes there are 'enough Republicans in Congress who remember that public service is not about sport or notching a political win.' ___ 3:15 p.m. Medical groups are beginning to weigh in on the Senate Republican health care bill, and they have problems with the proposal. The American Academy of Pediatrics says the bill would hurt children by scaling back Medicaid. Its president, Dr. Fernando Stein, says the plan was crafted without input from pediatricians and 'would tear down' the progress the nation has made by achieving insurance coverage for 95 percent of children. America's Essential Hospitals, which represents more than 300 safety-net health facilities, says the version the Senate released Thursday 'might be worse overall' than the House legislation and might lead to hospitals reducing services or closing. The Association of American Medical Colleges says the Senate plan would leave millions of people without health coverage, and others with only bare-bones insurance plans. ___ 2:15 p.m. Four Republican senators say they are not ready to vote for the GOP health care bill, putting the measure in jeopardy. The four are Ted Cruz of Texas, Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, Mike Lee of Utah and Rand Paul of Kentucky. They say in a statement that they are open to negotiation before the full Senate considers the measure. The four say there are provisions that are an improvement to the current health care system. But they add that the measure fails to accomplish what they have promised to their constituents, 'to repeal Obamacare and lower their health care costs.' GOP leaders hope to vote on the bill next week and can only afford two defections from the 52 Senate Republicans. ___ 1:50 p.m. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky says he and three other Republican senators are preparing to announced their opposition to the Senate health care bill as it's written. Their opposition puts the bill in jeopardy, since Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell can lose only two Republican senators and still pass the legislation. Paul tells The Associated Press in an interview that the bill released Thursday resembles 'Obamacare' too closely and does not go far enough to repeal former President Barack Obama's law. Paul says that he and the other senators are 'definitely open to negotiation' but that they need to make their opposition clear in order to ensure negotiations happen. McConnell is pushing toward a vote next week but Paul's stance throws that into question. ___ 1:30 p.m. U.S. Capitol Police are arresting dozens of people who are protesting cuts to Medicaid in the Senate Republicans' health care bill. The protesters have filled a hallway in one of the Senate office buildings, outside the office of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky. Some of the protesters are being escorted individually. Others are much more reluctant to leave and it's taking four or five officers to carry them out. The protesters are yelling 'no cuts to Medicaid' as they are being led away. One protester says he's with the disability rights group ADAPT. Phillip Corona says he traveled from Wisconsin to make his voice heard. Corona says Medicaid helps his son Anthony get out of bed every morning. Phillip Corona fears that changes to the program 'would possibly mean putting him in a nursing home.' Alison Barkoff — director of advocacy for the Center for Public Representation — helped organize the protest. She says the protesters rely on Medicaid to help them live and she says the health bill amounts to 'tax cuts for the wealthy on the backs of people with disabilities.' ___ 11:35 a.m. Democrats are roundly criticizing the Republican plan to scrap the Obama health care law. Minority Leader Chuck Schumer spoke on the Senate floor Thursday moments after the GOP's 142-page discussion draft was posted online. Republicans had been briefed on the plan behind closed doors. Schumer says, 'We live in the wealthiest country on earth. Surely we can do better than what the Republican health care bill promises.' House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi assails the GOP bill as a tax break for wealthy Americans. The bill would eliminate the requirement that Americans buy insurance or face a tax penalty. ___ 11:20 a.m. President Donald Trump is expressing hope that the Senate will pass a health care plan 'with heart' following the release of a Republican plan to dismantle President Barack Obama's health law. Trump says at the start of a White House event on technology he is hopeful Congress will get something done on health care 'with heart.' The president spoke shortly after Senate Republicans released a 142-page draft of their bill to get rid of much of Obama's law. The bill faces broad opposition from Democrats. But Trump says that Republicans would love to have Democratic support. ___ 11:18 a.m. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is praising the Republican plan to scuttle the Obama's health overhaul, arguing it's the right alternative to a 'failed' law. Moments after the 142-page discussion draft was unveiled, McConnell spoke on the Senate floor, renewing his criticism of the seven-year-old law. He outlined the GOP plan that would cut Medicaid, slash taxes and waive the requirement that Americans purchase health insurance. Senate Republicans had been briefed on the plan earlier Thursday. Emerging from the session, McConnell did not answer when asked if he has the votes to pass the GOP proposal. A vote would occur next week after budget analysts assess the package. ___ 10:56 a.m. Senate Republicans have released a 142-page draft of their bill to eliminate much of the Obama health care law. The measure would cut and revamp Medicaid, the health care program for lower-income and disabled people. It would repeal tax increases Obama's law imposed on higher-income people and medical industry companies to pay for expanded coverage. And it would end the tax penalty Obama's statute imposes on people who don't buy insurance — in effect, ending the so-called individual mandate. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is hoping to push the measure through the Senate next week. But its fate remains uncertain. It faces uniform Democratic opposition. And at least a half-dozen Republicans — both conservatives and moderates — have complained about it. ___ 10:20 a.m. Senate Republicans are holding a private meeting to hear from leaders about their long-awaited plan for eliminating much of President Barack Obama's health law. Lobbyists and congressional aides say the Senate bill would cut Medicaid, end penalties for people not buying insurance and rescind tax increases that Obama imposed to help pay for his law's expansion of coverage. Republicans plan to make their plan public later Thursday. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell developed the bill behind closed doors. The measure represents his attempt to satisfy GOP moderates and conservatives who've complained about the measure. McConnell hopes to push the measure through the Senate next week. But it remains unclear whether he will have enough votes.
  • It was a rather pleasant spring and now the first summer month too has been cooler than normal. Hot weather has not lasted more than a couple or few days so far this year. It sure saves the lawn and bushes a lot of stress and saves the watering bill and the A/C bill, so I like it. But I am sure sun tanning fans are not thrilled. It still looks like from today past the 4th of July real hot weather will continue to be hard to come by. Then odds of some heat go up if the new Weekly European Model Ensemble run is right. 1-15 Day GFS Ensemble average temperature departure from normal: End of June-early July rainfall amounts GFS Ensemble and Euro Ensemble: Hope for some drying beyond the current wet spell:      European Model the week ending July 7th: Then the model suggests more upper-level ridging which would bring warmer and drier if correct. The week ending July 14th: The model projects not dry weather in Georgia but less wet to open the new month, as the bigger rains are projected to shift north of here. None-the-less, it looks like odds for rain will be above-normal right into the start of August. So no drought and no extreme heat here. Week ending July 21st: Week ending July 28th: FOLLOW me on Twitter @MellishMeterWSB
  • A tornado damaged several businesses outside Birmingham, Alabama, onTuesday. >> Read more trending news Meteorologist Jason Holmes said buildings, including a liquor store and a fast-food restaurant, in the suburban community of Fairfield, west of the city, were reported damaged. Holmes also told The Associated Press that trees were down and buildings were reported damaged along the Interstate 20 corridor on the southwestern outskirts of Birmingham. Photographs on social media showed what appeared to be a funnel cloud in the air in the Birmingham area. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • French President Emmanuel Macron pledged Thursday to breathe new life into a European Union stung by the departure of Britain and deeply divided over the best way to accommodate refugees. The bloc showed signs of accord after the first day of a two-day leader's summit, announcing agreements on extending sanctions on Russia and on fighting climate change. Meanwhile, addressing a key issue in the Brexit negotiations that started this week, British Prime Minister Theresa May promised residency rights for the 3 million EU citizens now living in the U.K. May said she expects reciprocity for the estimated 1.5 million Britons living in EU member countries once Britain leaves the bloc. Macron's dynamism notably offers EU devotees new hope. He pushed at this summit — his first as head of state — for joint European defense, a joint budget for countries that use the euro and a tougher stance against the U.S. and China on trade. The 39-year-old Macron, who grew up in a united Europe and campaigned on an unabashedly pro-EU platform, promised to forge ahead with Germany to make a bloc soon to be composed of 27 instead of 28 nations stronger and more relevant to citizens. 'Europe is not, to my mind, just an idea. It's a project, an ambition,' Macron told reporters in Brussels. Macron's debut followed a series of reversals for anti-European and anti-migrant parties in elections in Austria, the Netherlands and France, and just a few months before Chancellor Angela Merkel heads to the polls in Germany. The specter of a far-right success in Germany, coupled with the departure of heavyweight member Britain, had undermined public confidence and fueled doubts about whether a unified Europe matters to citizens in a world where many feel left behind by globalization. After a string of small-scale attacks in European capitals this week, the EU leaders agreed Thursday to join efforts against online extremism and European fighters who go abroad to fight jihad, and to jointly develop or purchase military equipment like drones. They also agreed to extend sanctions against Russia over its actions in Ukraine, following a similar move by the United States this week. The sanctions fist imposed three years ago will be formally extended for another six months starting next week. After Britain's prime minister left the talks, the remaining leaders agreed to make a decision in November on what to do with the two EU agencies that are currently based in London. Despite the new luster leaders hope to give the European enterprise, deep divisions remain over how best to handle thousands of refugees in Greece and Italy. Some countries, including Hungary and Poland, have refused to take part in a legally binding scheme to share refugees from southern Europe with other partners. Macron said in an interview before the summit that countries cannot pick what rules to obey and should face 'political consequences' for not respecting those to which the EU has agreed. 'Europe is not a supermarket. Europe is a common destiny. It gets weaker when it allows its principles to be rejected,' he said in the interview with eight European newspapers. That stance did not go down well with some eastern EU states that have seen tens of thousands of people cross their territories over the last two years. 'The new French president is a new boy,' said Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, who has erected a border fence to keep migrants out. 'We'll have a look at him, get to know him. There are quite a few veterans here, who have been laboring for decades.' Macron's 'entrance was not very encouraging, because yesterday he thought that the best form of friendship was to kick the Central European countries. That's not the norm here,' Orban said. Still a child when Germany reunited, the Soviet Union collapsed and European nations decided to share their currencies, Macron hasn't lived through the European conflicts and tensions that other leaders experienced firsthand. While well-versed in European history — he is fond of quoting ancient philosophers — he is a forward-looking leader who sees no alternative to more European unity. The perceived lack of solidarity from other EU nations has hurt Italy and Greece. Around 160,000 refugees were to be relocated from the countries to other EU nations over two years. At current rates, fewer than 40,000 will be moved. European Parliament President Antonio Tajani — an Italian — said 'the current system of burden-sharing has failed.' 'A handful of countries of first entry are required to deal with most of those (asylum) applications. It is unfair that they should be left to shoulder this responsibility alone,' he told the leaders. ___ Raf Casert in Brussels and Geir Moulson in Berlin contributed to this report
  • Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:'Table Normal'; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:'; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:'Calibri',sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Henry County police say they arrested a man in the death of a 16-year-old girl in a hit-and-run crash. Robert Huynh, 19, was taken into custody at his McDonough home Wednesday evening. Police said he hit and killed 16-year-old Tasia Gartner, who was trying to cross Highway 81 East around 9:30 p.m. Monday. Authorities said he did not stop. Channel 2's Tom Jones spoke Gartner's father who told him he can't understand how someone could hit his daughter and keep going. 'I don't understand how someone just left our girl in a ditch,' he said, fighting back tears. 'All you had to do was stop.' Huynh was charged with hit-and-run resulting in serious injury or death, first degree homicide by vehicle and failure to report an accident. Officers said excellent police work helped them identify the type of car that hit her. Then, they said tips from witnesses did the rest. Authorities are still searching for the car allegedly involved in the crash. 'Well the information we are receiving is, from our witnesses, is the individual had mentioned somehow that he was trying to clean the vehicle up and he was going to take the vehicle someplace else to actually get the vehicle repaired,' said Capt. Mike Ireland. The family has started a GoFundMe account to help pay for funeral expenses. We're talking to police about the tip that may lead to the car used in the crash, on Channel 2 Action News at 6 p.m. Police have arrested a man accused of hitting and killing a teen then leaving the scene. Details at noon. @wsbtv pic.twitter.com/Y16tCmMFDY-- Tom Jones (@TomJonesWSBTV) June 22, 2017