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Tutor charged in ‘despicable’ assault that broke 7-year-old’s jaw, knocked out teeth, police say

A Maryland tutor accused of slamming a 7-year-old student’s face into a wall, breaking the boy’s jaw and knocking out some of his teeth, has been arrested after school surveillance cameras captured the entire incident, police said.

Timothy Randall Korr, 25, of Baltimore, was arrested Wednesday and charged with first- and second-degree child abuse, first- and second-degree assault, reckless endangerment and neglect of a minor, according to the Baltimore Police Department.

Police were called Monday to Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, where an ambulance had taken 7-year-old Trayvon Grayson for treatment. Trayvon’s mother, Lateekqua Jackson, told WBAL-TV that when she arrived at City Springs Elementary School, she found her son in the back of the ambulance, crying, bloody and with his face swollen.

Korr was also there, blood on his clothing, Jackson said.

“The teacher told me that he put him over his shoulder and, when he put him down, he was bleeding,” Jackson told the news station. “That’s it. How can you tell somebody like that? He said he made a mistake. He said, ‘I made a mistake. It was a mistake.’ That’s what he said.”

Fox 45 in Baltimore previously reported that Korr told school officials he was carrying Trayvon out of the classroom for being disruptive when he lost his footing and Trayvon “hit himself” on the wall.

Baltimore police officials said on Wednesday, however, that child abuse detectives investigating the case obtained surveillance video from the school, which caught the incident in full.

Chief T.J. Smith, a spokesman for the police department, said during a news conference on Wednesday that Korr’s conduct was “absolutely inappropriate” and “despicable.”

“To watch a child be basically manhandled like a sack of potatoes is incomprehensible,” Smith said.

Reporters asked how much of the alleged crime the video captured, and Smith said it caught the entire assault.

“The video does show him carrying the child and slamming him up against the wall, and it’s very difficult to watch,” Smith said during a news conference. “We cringed a number of times as we watched the video.”

Smith said the video showed Trayvon’s body go limp afterward. No other faculty or staff were seen in the video, but other children were present when Trayvon was injured, he said.

“That video basically made our investigation pick up that much more,” Smith said. “It showed an assault, and it showed this 7-year-old boy in school being slammed about by this 25-year-old man, and I'm being nice by calling him a 25-year-old man.”

The video, which Smith called “disgusting” to watch, will not be made public, he said.

Update on investigation after student assaulted at school

Posted by Baltimore Police Department on Wednesday, November 30, 2016

>> Read more trending stories

Jackson told WBAL-TV that her son will need surgery to repair some of the damage to his face and mouth. Besides the broken jaw, two of his teeth were knocked out and a third was driven into his gums.

He is also having nightmares about the incident, she said.

“He’s still shaking in his sleep, saying that he keeps having visions of (Korr) throwing him into a wall,” Jackson said.

Korr, who was initially suspended while police investigated the incident, has been fired by Baltimore Curriculum Project, the charter operator for City Springs Elementary.

If convicted of all charges, Korr faces 25 years in prison for each of the two child abuse charges, Smith said. The maximum penalty for first-degree assault, also a felony, is 15 years. The misdemeanor assault charge carries a maximum sentence of 10 years.

Reckless endangerment and neglect of a minor each carry a maximum sentence of five years. 

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  • The organ transplant of a 2-year-old boy who was born without a kidney will likely be stalled for months. The reason? His father’s latest arrest. Anthony Dickerson, 26, is no stranger to the criminal justice system. He has been in and out of jail on misdemeanor theft charges and a first-degree forgery charge since 2011, according to Gwinnett County jail records. Just this month, he was released on a $2,600 bond on charges of fleeing or attempting to elude a police officer and possession of a firearm or knife during the commission of attempted felonies. But Dickerson promised that his son would be the one thing he did right in his life, the child’s mother, Carmellia Burgess, told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. So when he found out he was a match to donate his kidney to Anthony Jr., he jumped at the chance to help. The family was “hysterical” when they found out the day of the planned surgery Oct. 3 that Emory University Hospital had changed the plan. “They’re making this about dad,” Burgess said. “It’s not about dad. It’s about our son.” In a letter The AJC obtained from Burgess, a hospital official said the surgery would be pushed back until Dickerson could provide evidence he has complied with his parole officer for three months. “We will re-evaluate Mr. Dickerson in January 2018 after receipt of this completed documentation,” the hospital representative said in the letter. Emory officials refused to answer The AJC’s questions about the decision or its policies, and Gwinnett law enforcement agencies have not responded to requests for comment. Janet Christenbury, an Emory spokeswoman, said in a statement the hospital is committed to the highest quality of care for its patients.  “Guidelines for organ transplantation are designed to maximize the chance of success for organ recipients and minimize risk for living donors,” Christenbury said. “Because of privacy regulations and respect for patient confidentiality, we cannot share specific information about our patients.” Burgess said news of the hospital’s decision caught her by surprise because Emory had earlier been supportive of the dad being the donor. The hospital even requested Dickerson’s temporary release from jail, according to a letter from Emory’s Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Program to the Gwinnett County jail where Dickerson was being held. “If Mr. Dickerson could be escorted to Emory for blood work and a pre-operative appointment tomorrow, September 29, we will be able to continue with the scheduled surgery,” an Emory official said in the letter dated Sept. 28. Even though jail records show Dickerson was released Oct. 2, the child’s surgery has not been rescheduled for this year. Burgess created a web petition to urge the hospital to allow the surgery sooner. It has garnered more than 18,400 signatures, but Burgess said she doubts the petition will make a difference. A GoFundMe page also was set up with a $1,000 goal. “I’m just taking it day by day,” she said. “That’s all we can do.” In other news:
  • British police are investigating three new allegations of sexual assault against film producer Harvey Weinstein, all made by the same woman. In another blow to the Hollywood titan after he was ejected from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, France's president said Sunday he was working to rescind Weinstein's prestigious Legion of Honor award. In the new British allegations, London's Metropolitan Police force said Sunday that the woman reported being assaulted in London in 2010, 2011 and 2015. The force said officers from its Child Abuse and Sexual Offenses Command are investigating. The woman's name has not been made public. The force also did not name Weinstein, in keeping with its policy of not identifying suspects who have not been charged. But it said the allegations involve a man against whom another accusation was made Wednesday. That alleged assault — reported to have taken place in west London during the late 1980s — also is being investigated. British actress Lysette Anthony says she reported to police on Wednesday that Weinstein raped her in her west London home in the late 1980s. Anthony, 54, who appears on the British soap opera 'Hollyoaks,' told the Sunday Times newspaper that Weinstein raped her in the late 1980s after showing up at her London home. She said she was left feeling 'disgusted and embarrassed' after the attack. 'It was pathetic, revolting,' she was quoted as saying in a Thursday interview. 'I remember lying in the bath later and crying.' Dozens of women have made allegations of sexual harassment and assault against the movie mogul in recent days, some dating back decades. Weinstein denies non-consensual sexual activity. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences took the almost unprecedented step Saturday of revoking Weinstein's membership. It said it did so 'to send a message that the era of willful ignorance and shameful complicity in sexually predatory behavior and workplace harassment in our industry is over.' Weinstein, who backed many British movies including 'Shakespeare in Love' and 'The King's Speech,' also has been suspended by the British film academy. The fallout from the multiplying accusations against Weinstein also reverberated in France on Sunday. French President Emmanuel Macron said he had 'started the procedures' to revoke Weinstein's Legion of Honor award. Rescinding the honor is rare, although it also happened to another American: disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong. Weinstein was given the prestigious French award in 2012 by then-President Nicolas Sarkozy after the French film 'The Artist' won multiple Oscars. Weinstein's company produced the film, and he predicted in an interview with The Associated Press at the time that it would augur a new 'golden age' of French cinema. French actresses are among those who have accused Weinstein of sexual wrongdoing, notably during his multiple appearances at the Cannes Film Festival. Macron said he wants to speed up procedures for investigating and prosecuting sexual harassment in France to encourage more women to come forward. ___ Angela Charlton in Paris contributed.
  • The Latest on the explosion in Somalia's capital (all times local): 7:30 a.m. Qatar's foreign minister says his country's diplomatic mission in Somalia was hit by the massive truck bombing in Mogadishu. Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani said on Twitter early Monday morning: 'The attack on (hashtag)Qatar diplomatic mission in Mogadishu will not deter our support for (hashtag)Somalia's democracy, security and stability.' He did not elaborate. It was unclear if any Qataris were hurt in the blast. Officials in Doha did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Somalia has found itself torn by the boycott by four Arab nations of Qatar. Saudi Arabia is the Somali government's biggest benefactor, while the United Arab Emirates has trained the country's military and launched a high-profile aid appeal this year. Somalia has meanwhile allowed Qatari aircraft to increasingly fly through its airspace as Arab nations have closed theirs off. A Somali state in September broke with Somalia's central government in Mogadishu, saying it backed the boycotting nations. ___ Jon Gambrell in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. ___ 12:45 a.m. Somalia's information minister Abdirahman Osman says the death toll from Saturday's truck bombing in Mogadishu has risen to 276, with about 300 people injured. It is the deadliest single attack in Somalia's history. The toll is expected to rise. Somalia's government has blamed the al-Shabab extremist group, which has not yet commented. ___ 12:40 a.m. U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres says he is 'sickened' by the deadliest single attack in Somalia's history. Guterres in a tweet Sunday night urged 'unity in the face of terrorism.' Saturday's truck bombing in Mogadishu killed at least 231 people. Another 275 are hurt. Somalia's government has blamed the al-Shabab extremist group, which has not yet commented. Officials fear the death toll will rise. ___ 10:05 p.m. The United States is condemning 'in the strongest terms' the deadliest single attack in Somalia's history. The State Department statement expresses condolences to victims and wishes a quick recovery for the injured. Saturday's truck bombing in Mogadishu killed at least 231 people. Another 275 are hurt. The U.S. calls the attack 'senseless and cowardly' and says it will stand with Somalia in its fight against extremism. ___ 6:35 p.m. Qatar says its embassy was 'severely damaged' in the deadly truck bombing in Somalia's capital. A foreign ministry statement Sunday says the embassy's charge d'affaires was 'slightly injured in the explosion but he is now in a good health, and the rest of staff are fine.' Saturday's blast killed at least 231 people. It is the deadliest ever attack in the Horn of Africa nation. ___ 5:50 p.m. The United Nations special envoy to Somalia calls the deadly truck bombing in the capital 'revolting' and says an unprecedented number of civilians have been killed. A statement from Michael Keating says: 'I am shocked and appalled by the number of lives that were lost in the bombings and the scale of destruction they caused.' Saturday's blast struck a densely populated neighborhood of Mogadishu. The death toll has risen to 231. It is the deadliest ever attack in the Horn of Africa nation. Keating says the U.N. and African Union are supporting the Somali government's response with 'logistical support, medical supplies and expertise.' ___ 5:45 p.m. The U.S. Africa Command says U.S. forces have not been asked to provide aid following Saturday's deadly attack in Somalia's capital. A U.S. Africa Command spokesman tells The Associated Press that first responders and local enforcement would handle the response and 'the U.S. would offer assistance if and when a request was made.' A Somali senator says the death toll from the massive truck bomb blast in Mogadishu has risen to 231, with 275 people injured. It is the deadliest ever attack in the Horn of Africa nation. ___ 5:35 p.m. Angry protesters have taken to the streets in Somalia's capital a day after a massive truck bomb killed at least 231 people. The protesters who gathered at the scene of the blast are chanting against the attack, the deadliest ever in the Horn of Africa nation. The government has blamed the Somalia-based al-Shabab extremist group for what it calls a 'national disaster.' Al-Shabab has not commented but often targets Mogadishu with bombings. ___ 5:20 p.m. A senator says the death toll from a massive truck bomb blast in Somalia's capital has risen to 231. Abshir Abdi Ahmed says 275 others were injured. He cites doctors at hospitals he has visited in Mogadishu. Saturday's blast is the single deadliest attack ever in the Horn of Africa nation. Many of the bodies in hospital mortuaries are yet to be identified. ___ 3:05 p.m. Local journalists say one freelance journalist was killed in Saturday's massive bombing in Somalia's capital and several were injured. Voice of America says one of its reporters, Abdulkaidr Mohamed Abdulle, is among the injured. Police and hospital sources say the death toll from the truck bomb in Mogadishu has risen to 189 in what is the single deadliest attack ever in the Horn of Africa nation. — Abdi Guled in Mogadishu. ___ 2:35 p.m. The death toll from a massive explosion in Somalia's capital has risen to 189 with over 200 others injured, police and hospital sources say, making it the single deadliest attack ever in the Horn of Africa nation. Doctors are struggling to assist hundreds of horrifically wounded victims, with many burnt beyond recognition. Somalia's government has blamed Saturday's truck bombing in Mogadishu on the al-Shabab extremist group, which has not commented. — Abdi Guled in Mogadishu. ___ 1:25 p.m. The United States is joining the condemnation of Saturday's massive truck bombing in Somalia's capital that left scores dead. A statement by the U.S. mission to Somalia says that 'such cowardly attacks reinvigorate the commitment of the United States to assist our Somali and African Union partners to combat the scourge of terrorism.' The U.S. military this year has stepped up drone strikes and other efforts this year against the al-Qaida-linked al-Shabab, which is based in Somalia and often targets Mogadishu. ___ 1:20 p.m. The International Committee of the Red Cross says four volunteers with the Somali Red Crescent Society are among the dead after a huge truck bombing in Somalia's capital. A statement Sunday says 'this figure may rise as there are a number of volunteers still missing.' Security and medical sources say at least 53 people are dead after what Mogadishu residents call the largest explosion they've ever witnessed. Officials have pleaded for blood donations. More than 60 people are injured. Somalia's government has blamed the al-Shabab extremist group, which has not commented. ___ 10:45 a.m. Security and medical sources say the death toll from Saturday's truck bomb blast in Somalia's capital has risen to 53 as hospitals struggle to cope with the high number of casualties. More than 60 others are injured. Police Capt. Mohamed Hussein says many victims died at hospitals from their wounds. Somalia's government has yet to release the exact death toll from an explosion many called the most powerful they had ever witnessed in Mogadishu. Ambulance sirens still echo across the city as bewildered families wander in the rubble of buildings. President Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed has joined thousands of people who responded to a desperate plea by hospitals to donate blood for the wounded victims. The al-Shabab extremist group often targets high-profile areas in the capital with bombings.
  • A Georgia woman says she could face arrest because she can't afford the funeral expense for her late husband. >> Read more trending news A funeral home storing the man's remains said it may press charges for abandonment of a body. Betty Starnes told WSB-TV she made it clear when her husband’s body was brought to Southern Cremations and Funerals at Cheatham Hill, Georgia, that she couldn’t pay for it up front.  But the funeral home tells a different story that could land her in jail. “It’s just unconscionable when you’ve lost somebody you love,” Starnes said. Starnes said it has been nearly two weeks since she lost her husband. Now, she’s worried she could lose her freedom. “I went to pieces. I said I’m not going to jail and I’m not a crook,” Starnes said.  When her husband died on Oct. 6, she asked the funeral home to pick up his body. It’s been stored at the funeral home ever since, awaiting cremation. Starnes said she can’t afford to pay the nearly $1,000 bill and unless she pays it by Friday or pays to move the body somewhere else, she said the owner of the funeral home is threatening to press charges for abandonment of a body. “He said this is a felony offense. I said I’m not a felon. I want my husband’s body, but you won’t let me have it. You won’t work with me,” Starnes said.  WSB-TV reporter Justin Wilfon went to the funeral home Wednesday night looking for the owner. The owner later sent WSB-TV a statement, saying: “Southern Cremations & Funerals at Cheatham Hill is a local, family-owned business that serves hundreds of families every year in their time of need. Cheatham Hill Memorial Park has been assisting families in our community for over 38 years. We take excellent care of our families and provide the highest level of service to them, and their loved ones. “Southern Cremations & Funerals at Cheatham Hill received a call on October 6 at 2:13pm from Mrs. Betty Starnes requesting that we take her deceased husband, Mr. Kenneth Starnes into our care. We brought him into our care later that day. Mrs. Starnes visited our funeral home on October 7 and was apprised of all the costs associated with the services she requested, and signed a contract for those services at that time. As is reasonable and customary in our industry, Mrs. Starnes understood that payment would be required prior to cremation. She indicated that payment would be rendered by October 9. “We have not received payment for any of our services and have been actively working with the family for several days to address this unfortunate situation. Mrs. Starnes has been notified of all her options, including alternative resources that she could contact if she needed assistance in paying for the services selected. We are working diligently to resolve this situation. It is unfortunate that Mrs. Starnes has chosen to go directly to the media versus contacting the resources she was given, including our firm transferring her husband to another provider.” Starnes told WSB-TV she was confused when she signed a contract and would be willing to set up a payment plan, but the funeral home’s owner said he wants the payment in full before cremation, which he said is customary in the industry. “I said we don’t have cash up front. You people knew that coming in,” Starnes said.  Her husband was a military veteran, wounded in Vietnam. After serving his country, she hopes someone will now help him and keep her out of jail. “Maybe someone will find it in their heart to help,” Starnes said.  The funeral home’s statement said Starnes has been notified of all her options, including alternative resources that she could contact if she needed assistance in paying for the services selected. But Starnes said she has exhausted all of her options and no one can help.
  • A man and his fiancée planned on becoming a family of two, but after their wedding last month they became a family of three after a four-legged wedding crasher broke in on their ceremony. Marília and Matheus had planned on an outdoor wedding last month, but a storm came in so they moved their ceremony to a tent. At the same time, a stray dog was looking for a dry place to wait out the storm, the Dodo reported. >> Read more trending news  Wedding guests tried to shoo the muddy dog away, but he came back. Right when the bride was supposed to walk in, the dog came down the aisle. Guests removed the dog again, and everything went as planned. Until it came time for the vows. The dog returned and decided he was going nowhere, taking a nap on Marílla’s veil. The dog stayed through the ceremony, and the reception until the rain stopped. The dog left of his own accord, the Dodo reported. You’d think the story would end that day, but it didn’t. The couple realized the dog was now part of their lives and if they could find him, they would adopt him. But a week went by without a reunion. Eventually they found their extra wedding guest and brought the now-former street dog home, gave him a bath, some food and a name: Snoop.
  • The Latest on the conviction of a white former Oklahoma police officer in the fatal shooting of his daughter's black boyfriend (all times local): 8:30 a.m. An Oklahoma prosecutor says he is not surprised or disappointed that a jury convicted a white former police officer of manslaughter instead of murder in the fatal shooting of his daughter's black boyfriend. Tulsa County District Attorney Steve Kunzweiler said Thursday that he's just grateful the jury gave closure to the case after three previous trials ended with hung juries. The jury late Wednesday convicted former officer Shannon Kepler of first-degree manslaughter in the 2014 shooting death of Jeremey Lake. Kepler testified he thought Lake had a gun, but no weapon was found on or near Lake's body. The juries in Kepler's previous three trials deadlocked 11-1, 10-2 and 6-6, leading the judge to declare mistrials. ___ 1:15 a.m. A white former Oklahoma police officer has been convicted of first-degree manslaughter in his fourth trial for the 2014 fatal shooting of his daughter's black boyfriend. Jurors reached a verdict for the lesser charge late Wednesday in ex-Tulsa officer Shannon Kepler's first-degree murder trial. The jury recommended a sentence of 15 years in prison. A sentencing hearing is scheduled for November 20. Kepler was off-duty when he shot 19-year-old Jeremey Lake. He told investigators he fired because he thought Lake had a gun, but police found no weapon at the scene or on Lake. Kepler said he was trying to protect his daughter, Lisa Kepler, because she was living in a crime-ridden neighborhood. Jurors in Kepler's previous three trials deadlocked 11-1, 10-2 and 6-6, leading the judge to declare mistrials.