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'Star Wars' actress Carrie Fisher dead at 60
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'Star Wars' actress Carrie Fisher dead at 60

What You Need to Know: Carrie Fisher

'Star Wars' actress Carrie Fisher dead at 60

Actress Carrie Fisher has died, People magazine reported Tuesday. She was 60 years old.

>> Read more trending stories  

Multiple news outlets reported Friday that the star suffered cardiac arrest on a United Airlines flight from London to Los Angeles as it prepared to land at LAX. The Los Angeles Fire Department said paramedics were there when the plane landed and "provided Advanced Life Support and aggressively treated and transported the patient to a local hospital." Her brother, Todd Fisher, told reporters that his sister was in the Intensive Care Unit.

Tuesday, a family spokeman released a statement on behalf of Carrie Fisher's daughter, Billie Lourd.

"It is with a very deep sadness that Billie Lourd confirms that her beloved mother Carrie Fisher passed away at 8:55 this morning," the statement said. "She was loved by the world and she will be missed profoundly. Our entire family thanks you for your thoughts and prayers."

Carrie Fisher suffered a heart attack, according to People.

Carrie Frances Fisher was born October 21, 1956 to Hollywood actor Debbie Reynolds and singer Eddie Fisher.

Best known for her role as Princess Leia in the original "Star Wars" trilogy starting in 1977, the character that propelled her into fame.

In the '80s, Fisher battled addictions to alcohol and drugs, which she wrote about in her first book, 1987's  "Postcards from the Edge." The successful, semi-autobiographical novel is about an actress addicted to drugs. It was made into a movie in 1990 for which Fisher wrote the screenplay. Meryl Streep and Shirley MacLaine starred in the film. 

Fisher has also had success as a script consultant for multiple movies, revising scripts for "Sister Act" and "The Wedding Singer." 

In 2008, Fisher released "Wishful Drinking," an autobiographical book in which she wrote more about her struggles with addiction and mental illness. It was turned into a one-woman stage play starring Fisher and aired on HBO.

In a 2015 interview with Diane Sawyer, Fisher publicly revealed her struggles with manic depression, a chemical disorder also known as bipolar disorder.

"I used to think I was a drug addict, pure and simple -- just someone who could not stop taking drugs willfully," she said. "And I was that. But it turns out that I am severely manic depressive. 

Fisher returned to the "Star Wars" franchise in 2015's "Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens." She was also recently seen in "Rogue One: A Star Wars Story." She was age-regressed thanks to digital technology. She just finished shooting "Star Wars: Episode VIII."

Fisher is survived by her daughter, Billie Catherine Lourd, from a previous relationship with agent Bryan Lourd.

Shortly after news of her death was announced, her costars and fans took to social media to mourn.

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