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In an attack that British Muslims say was aimed directly at them, a man plowed a van into a crowd of Muslim worshippers outside a north London mosque early Monday, injuring 10 people. London police are investigating it as a terrorist incident.

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  • Of the nation’s 100 most populated cities, only one was deemed the best of the best for Fourth of July: Atlanta. » RELATED: Atlanta festivals and Fourth of July weekend events | July 1-4 Based on five key dimensions (celebrations; affordability; attractions and activities; safety and accessibility and Fourth of July weather forecast), analysts at personal finance site WalletHub named our very own metro the top city in the nation to celebrate Independence Day. Analysts examined 18 relevant metrics to reach the verdict, including legality of fireworks, number of festivals and concerts, walkability and prices of beer, hamburgers and more. » RELATED: America’s 10 biggest and brightest Fourth of July fireworks shows They used data from the Census, Council for Community and Economic Research, Eventbrite and several other sources for the ranking. Atlanta earned a total score of 78.01, making it in the top 10 for the celebrations and attractions/activities dimensions — and rightfully, so. Check out all the happenings around town for the big holiday: The Dunwoody 4th of July Parade Decatur’s Pied Piper Parade Chamblee 4th of July Celebration Fourth in the Park on Marietta Square 4th of July at Centennial Olympic Park Fourth of July at Stone Mountain Park Coca-Cola July 4th Fest at Six Flags Over Georgia The AJC Peachtree Road Race And most of those celebrations listed don’t even include the endless list of fireworks extravaganzas, including the popular Atlanta Braves fireworks, the Star-Spangled display at Mall of Georgia or the Callaway Gardens Beach Party show. Remember, the popular Lenox Square fireworks are a thing of the past, but the mall announced it is partnering with Centennial Olympic Park for “a more spectacular fireworks show than ever before.” » RELATED: More 4th of July fireworks, parades and attractions in Atlanta Rounding out the top five on WalletHub’s list of the best places to celebrate Independence Day were San Francisco, California; Buffalo, New York; Washington, D.C.; and San Diego, California. The worst places to ring in the Fourth, according to the ranking? Newark, New Jersey; Jersey City, New Jersey; Gilbert, Arizona; Lubbock, Texas; and San Bernardino, California. More about the WalletHub ranking and its methodology.
  • Danish shipping conglomerate A.P. Moller-Maersk was one of multiple European companies to fall victim Tuesday to a cyberattack as Ukrainian government officials reported a “large-scale hacker attack” across the country. >> Read more trending news Attacks were also reported in several other countries, Russia cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab said in a statement, including the United States, Russia, Poland, Italy, the United Kingdom, Germany and France.
  • The public should be careful of what they touch. As the opioid drug epidemic grows, Marietta police are warning of a possible hidden danger that could be lurking in public places such as restrooms, hotel rooms, even rental cars. Officer Chuck McPhilamy tells WSB, 'What happens to the average hotel worker that's at any hotel in the city cleaning a room that happened across some residue?'   Anyone who comes in contact with drug residue could be at risk.  McPhilamy says drugs laced with Fentanyl can be absorbed simply by touching it. He says 'That changes the game,' and 'changes our concern level.'  McPhilamy says, 'It can be inhaled through your nose or your mouth, it can be absorbed through your skin or your eyes.' A concern is the average person may have no idea what the drugs look like.  McPhilamy says, 'Fentanyl itself can come in so many different forms it's not like I can tell you just look for one substance.' There have been no reports of this happening in Georgia.  McPhilamy says he doesn't want to cause a panic, but he wants people to be aware. Even if a person is not a drug addict, they may come across people who use or sell these potentially dangerous drugs.  He says, 'I think we're talking about two different cultures intersecting.' If anyone sees something that looks suspicious, police say call 9-1-1, and if one should start feeling ill, get medical attention immediately.    
  • Millionaires would get tax cuts averaging $52,000 a year from the Senate Republicans' health bill while middle-income families would get about $260, according to a new analysis of the foundering bill. The analysis was done by the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center. It found that half of the tax cuts would go to families making more than $500,000 a year. Senate Republican leaders were scrambling Tuesday to rally support for the bill but had to delay a vote this week because it lacked adequate support. The disputes, however, were not related to tax provisions. Moderate Republicans were concerned that too many people would lose health coverage under the bill while conservatives said it wouldn't do enough to reduce premiums. The Republican health bill would repeal and replace President Barack Obama's health law. The law imposed a series of tax increases targeting mainly high-income families. The Senate Republican bill would repeal the taxes, though not all at once. 'The Senate bill would cut annual household taxes by about $670 on average. But the variation among income groups would be very wide,' Howard Gleckman, a senior fellow at the Tax Policy Center wrote on the group's website. 'Much like the House-passed American Health Care Act, the Senate leadership's health bill includes a huge tax cut that mostly benefits the nation's highest-income households,' Gleckman said. For example, families making $20,000 a year would get an average tax cut of about $200. But the super rich, those making $5 million or more, would receive an average tax cut of nearly $250,000. The bill would repeal a tax on wealthy investors, saving them about $172 billion over the next decade. Obama's health law enacted an additional 3.8 percent tax on investment income for married couples making more than $250,000 a year and individuals making more than $125,000. The Senate bill would repeal the tax this year. The bill would also repeal a new Medicare payroll tax on high-income families, saving them about $59 billion over the next decade. Obama's health law enacted an additional 0.9 percent payroll tax on wages above $250,000 for married couples and above $125,000 for individuals. The Senate bill would repeal the tax in 2023. For families with lower incomes, the bill would repeal a tax penalty for people who do not get health insurance, saving them $38 billion over the next decade. The analysis looked at the tax savings for families in 2026, once the Republican bill would be fully phased in. The analysis did not include the tax credits that people would receive to help buy health insurance. Those credits would benefit many low- and middle-income families, assuming that wealthier taxpayers would get health insurance through their employers. ___ Follow Stephen Ohlemacher on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/stephenatap
  • Hillary Clinton received a standing ovation when she said librarians are on the front line of 'the fight to defend truth and reason, evidence and facts.' The 2016 Democratic presidential candidate spoke Tuesday during the American Library Association's meeting in Chicago. Clinton steered clear of Washington political issues, including the Republican health care bill and the recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling on President Donald Trump's travel ban. But she did express concern about the administration's threats to cut public library funding, saying 'libraries are actually under attack from our own government.' She also told the roughly 3,000 attendees that her upcoming book about running for president is about resilience and 'how to get up after a loss.' She says what helped her most after the election were walks in the woods, an occasional glass of Chardonnay and losing herself in books.
  • The Fourth of July is quickly approaching, and Americans are getting ready to host family and friends in celebration of the country’s independence. But one town is asking its residents to rethink their participation in the popular explosive tradition. Authorities in Columbia, a small Connecticut town, are concerned about the welfare of a bald eagle family, The Associated Press reported. RELATED: Reeling in a camera from the Tennessee River revealed hundreds of photos and led to a remarkable meeting between strangers A pair of eagles moved to the town last summer, and a female eaglet hatched only a few months ago. The eaglet has not yet developed the ability to fly. Seeing as its nest is 100 feet off the ground, wildlife biologist Brian Hess, who works for the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP), is concerned that fireworks might scare the eaglet from its nest. “Eagles and fireworks are both sort of this great American tradition,” Hess added. “But I can’t think of a more perfectly startling thing than a firework.” Town administrator Mark Walter announced that an official display was not planned. Residents have been threatened with fines and jail time should any fireworks harm the nest. Walter said  DEEP would be “available for dispatch if needed.” “The resident trooper will be the enforcement agency to make any finds concerning illegal fireworks,” he said. “I would not be happy if something happens to that eaglet,” said 28-year resident Janice Thibodeau. Though she said her neighbors have already purchased thousands of dollars in fireworks as they do every year, she suggested that they wait until Labor Day to fire them. Though bald eagles are no longer an endangered species, harming them invites prosecution on the state and federal levels. RELATED: Army veteran rescues eagle dangling from tree during nation’s birthday weekend An email from Hess was forwarded to the residents of the town regarding the decision. A copy of the email was shared with Rare.us: