ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
55°
Broken Clouds
H 72° L 56°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    55°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Cloudy. H 73° L 55°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    73°
    Today
    Mostly Cloudy. H 73° L 55°
  • heavy-rain-day Created with Sketch.
    74°
    Tomorrow
    Chance of Rain. H 74° L 58°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

National News

    Two homes are being torn down to help clear the way for repairs to a broken sewer line that caused a sinkhole on Christmas Eve in suburban Detroit. Three houses had to be condemned in Fraser and a major road has been closed. Macomb County Public Works spokesman Dan Heaton says one of those homes was demolished Friday and the other is expected to be torn down on Monday. Macomb County Public Works chief Candice Miller says in a statement that 'heartfelt sympathies go out to these impacted families.' Construction crews next week plan to begin to dig a roughly 300-foot-long, 25-foot-wide shaft to allow sewer line repair and replacement. Work to restore the area is expected to wrap up by the end of the year.
  • It’s hard to be a parent when your child gets arrested. And not everyone takes it well. But one mother showed gratitude to police who arrested her daughter in Florida while she was on spring break. >> Read more trending news The Walton County Sheriff’s Office posted the text of a letter it received last week on its Facebook page. In the note, a mother thanks the department for arresting her 19-year-old daughter for underage drinking. “Yesterday, my daughter was one of the thousands of spoiled spring breakers ‘living it up’ on the beach,” she wrote. “She got arrested for underage drinking. She was holding a can of beer on the beach. A stupid move that I warned her about before she left, but I’m just her mother, so ‘in one ear and out the other.’” She said the arrest taught her daughter a lesson, and she thanked the officers for their professionalism. “The arrest scared the hell out of her, and I’m hoping she learned her lesson. The reason that I am sending this is that every officer that I talked to or that I could hear in the background talking to her was so nice! Firm, but nice,” the mother wrote. “For a mom hundreds of miles away, that was very reassuring. I know you all have to deal with this on a daily basis, which must be completely annoying, and I'm very sorry my daughter added to your workload yesterday. They say you always have one child that makes you go grey early and she is mine! Thank you for saving me a few more grey hairs last night.” The post has been liked more than 3,000 times.
  • Disney CEO Bob Iger says the upcoming 'Star Wars' sequel has not been changed due to the death of Carrie Fisher. Fisher completed filming her role as Princess Leia in 'The Last Jedi' before her death following a heart attack in December. Iger said in an interview at a University of Southern California tech conference Thursday that Fisher 'appears throughout' the film and her performance 'remains as it was.' Iger says Disney is discussing 'what could be another decade and a half of Star Wars stories.' Iger's remark came on the same day Disney ended speculation that he would retire this year by extending his contract one year to 2019. He says he and Disney's board thought they needed more time to work on a succession plan.
  • Russian President Vladimir Putin held a surprise meeting Friday with France's far-right presidential candidate Marine Le Pen, yet dismissed suggestions that Russia aims to influence the election in her favor. Le Pen met Putin hours after a previously announced visit to the lower house of the Russian parliament. In the meeting with members of the Duma, Le Pen urged Russia and France to work together to save the world from globalism and Islamic fundamentalism. Such positions put her in parallel with Kremlin stances and there has been wide speculation that Russia aims to influence the upcoming French election. But Putin dismissed those claims. 'We in no way want to influence events, but retain for ourselves the right to meet with all representatives of all political powers, just as our partners in Europe and the U.S. do,' he said. Le Pen has made multiple trips to Russia and often met with Russian lawmakers. Moscow has courted far-right parties in Europe in an influence-building campaign amid friction between Russia and the West over the conflict in Ukraine and the war in Syria. France's two-round presidential election takes place on April 23 and May 7. Le Pen is expected to be among the top two vote getters on April 23 who move on to a presidential runoff on May 7.
  • The Cherokee County Sheriff's Department said that one person was killed in a car crash on Interstate 575 Friday morning.Sheriff's spokesman Howard J. Baker said the car went off an embankment at Ridgewalk Parkway in Woodstock.We have a reporter and photographer at the scene - Watch Channel 2 Action News at NoonChannel 2's Steve Gehlbach said the driver may have been going at a high rate of speed before the deadly crash. Driver killed in fatal crash on 575 in Woodstock went up this 'ramp' at high speed and down huge drop pic.twitter.com/WA9apndJaO-- Steve Gehlbach (@SteveGWSB) March 24, 2017 Driver killed going off embankment at Little River from I-575 pic.twitter.com/9rgg0n1yRR-- Steve Gehlbach (@SteveGWSB) March 24, 2017 The southbound traffic is backed up to Canton. Drivers can use Bells Ferry to get around the crash. .@csopio Cherokee Co. Sheriff's Office helping w/ a car off the road at Little River. You see the activity 575/sb between Sixes & Ridgewalk-- Ashley Frasca (@AshleyFrascaWSB) March 24, 2017 You can download our news app for alerts across metro Atlanta here TRENDING STORIES: Todd Chrisley and his wife owe the state nearly $800,000, documents say Judge dismisses 11 charges against man accused of holding women captive Deputies: Family kept badly decomposed body, used Vietnam vet's benefits
  • A new program is bringing life to struggling neighborhoods.Channel 2's Linda Stouffer spoke with new home buyers Thursday who are also benefiting.A renovated kitchen was just one thing that caught 24-year old Rashawn Simmons's attention as he searched for his first home in the Pittsburgh community.'I love to cook and as you can see, there's plenty of room for me to cook,' Simmons told Stouffer as they walked around the home. 'I want to put an offer on this place. I really do. The only thing is it was a little higher than others. I saw the sign outside that said $30,000 down-payment assistance.'That down-payment money will make his mortgage payment a better deal than rent. TRENDING STORIES: Todd Chrisley and his wife owe the state nearly $800,000, documents say College student starved for years speaks out for first time Judge dismisses 11 charges against man accused of holding women captive The Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership is distributing $2 million to help more families find homes with grants of $20,000 or $30,000 each.It's making an impact on Welch Street, where the organization is partnering with the Annie E. Casey Foundation to do renovations.The organization is going house by house.'We're now concentrating on this block of Welch Street and doing six homes and we'll be doing three more,' said Antallie Keiser with the Annie E. Casey Foundation'We just have so much to look forward to in this community. So if you move here, it's a come up, that's the way I see it,' homeowner Chandra McGee told Stouffer.'It's still unbelievable. Some days, I'm just there getting things unpacked and I'm like, 'Wow! This is actually my house,'' Simmons said.Buyers can look for the assistance in four counties: Fulton, Clayton, DeKalb and Douglas. Eligibility is based on income levels.
  • Astronauts ventured out on a spacewalk Friday to prep the International Space Station for a new parking spot. NASA's Shane Kimbrough and France's Thomas Pesquet emerged early from the orbiting complex, then went their separate ways to accomplish as much as possible 250 miles up. 'We are ready to get to work,' Mission Control informed them. Their main job involves disconnecting an old docking port. This port needs to be moved in order to make room for a docking device compatible with future commercial crew capsules, and provide more clearance. The new docking device — the second of two — will fly up late this year or early next and hook onto this port. If all goes well, flight controllers in Houston will relocate the old docking port Sunday, using the station's robotic arm. Then next Thursday, the crew will conduct another spacewalk to secure the unit. SpaceX and Boeing are developing capsules capable of flying astronauts to and from the space station. Until the SpaceX Crew Dragon and Boeing Starliner come on line — possibly next year — U.S. astronauts will have to keep riding Russian rockets to orbit. Before working on the docking port, Kimbrough replaced a computer-relay box with an upgraded version. Pesquet, meanwhile, looked for signs of a small ammonia coolant leak in outdoor plumbing. He patted and tugged at hoses, but did not spot any frozen flakes of ammonia. A GoPro camera caught his every move for playback later. 'No flakes. All good,' Pesquet reported. Also on the spacewalkers' to-do list Friday: replace a pair of Japanese cameras and grease latching mechanisms on the end of the big robot arm. NASA wants to cram in two and possibly three spacewalks before Kimbrough, the station's commander, returns to Earth on April 10. Before a third spacewalk can be conducted, however, Orbital ATK needs to launch a cargo ship to the space station with replacement parts. That shipment was supposed to be there by now, but repeatedly has been delayed because of rocket concerns. It's unclear when the Atlas V rocket will be ready to soar from Cape Canaveral, Florida. NASA has been contracting out cargo deliveries since the end of the space shuttle program in 2011. The space agency is counting on private companies to do the same with astronauts. ___ Online: NASA: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/index.html
  • She's small but mighty — and she could be worth more than $3 million. Christie's announced Friday that a 9-inch-tall marble sculpture, called the Guennol (gwehn-AHL') Stargazer, will be auctioned on April 28 in New York. The statue of a female idol from ancient Turkey dates to around 3000 to 2200 B.C. It's thought that the idol was related to fertility. About 15 nearly complete idols survive. The auctioneer says this one — like most — has a neck injury, suggesting it was ritually 'killed' at the time of burial. It has button-like eyes; a vertical, carrot-shaped nose; a pear-type torso; and no discernible chest. The work, from a private collection, has been on loan at The Metropolitan Museum of Art at various times.
  • Quiet on the set! Surrounded by militant training sites on uprooted Jewish settlement lands, the first movie set in the Gaza Strip is growing, depicting the history-rich, volatile alleyways of Jerusalem's Old City. The set is the latest effort by the al-Aqsa channel, run by Gaza's Islamic militant Hamas rulers, to kick-start its drama production in the territory and release another series slated to air in the month of Ramadan. In Gaza, filming footage of Jerusalem and other central locations from the conflict is a challenge. Gaza's population of about 2 million live in mostly cramped conditions in the coastal sandy territory compared to the rugged mountain terrain of the West Bank, so crews have struggled to film the twisting ancient alleyways of Jerusalem's Old City. And that is how the idea to create a set depicting Jerusalem was born. The fate of Jerusalem is an emotional issue at the heart of the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians. Israel captured east Jerusalem, home to the Old City with its holy sites sacred to Jews, Christians and Muslims, in the 1967 war. Palestinians want the territory for their future state. Much of the wave of Palestinian attacks that erupted in 2015 originated from tensions surrounding the most sensitive holy site in Jerusalem's Old City. The hilltop compound is revered by Jews as the Temple Mount, where the two biblical Jewish Temples stood and is the most sacred place in Judaism. It is home to the Al-Aqsa Mosque and the gold-topped Dome of the Rock, the third-holiest site in Islam after Mecca and Medina in Saudi Arabia. Mohammed Thoraya, the channel's manager, described how the Old City was depicted on set. 'We brought something simple of the wall decorations there and — thank God — we could simulate something small of what is there,' he said. On a recent day, actors divided into two groups. One portraying ultra-Orthodox Jews and the other Arab residents of Jerusalem trying to prevent the Jews from entering the holy site compound that is still under construction. Clashes were staged, and actors playing Israeli policemen in riot gear and wielding M16 assault rifles struggled with those depicting the Arabs. Occasionally, an actor would smile or forget their lines, prompting the director to reshoot the scene, sometimes over 10 times. Actors are paid between $US 4 and $US 9 a day. The series being filmed is set to be aired in the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan, which begins in late May this year. It's the fifth such production by the al-Aqsa channel. Some watchdogs have considered previous productions of the channel anti-Semitic. Hamas is sworn to the destruction of the Jewish state. After winning the 2006 legislative elections, Hamas seized Gaza from forces loyal to Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in bloody street battles in 2007, and has since fought three wars with Israel. The series, Heaven's Gate, shows 'the steadfastness of Jerusalemites and their sticking to their land and properties in the face of Zionist settlement,' said the director, Zouhir al-Efrengi. Most of the film crew has never been to Jerusalem. They secured footage of Jerusalem and the West Bank separately. The location features an alleyway, cafe and homes with green doors. Boards painted brown simulate the ancient stone of Jerusalem's Old City's walls. Thoraya, the manager, said an expansion of the location would see building al-Aqsa Mosque and the Dome of the Rock. It will also be open for visitors 'and those who long for Jerusalem.' For three months, the crew has been spending 15 to 18 hours daily shooting. 'I cried when I first came here and saw it,' said Ali Nasman, 32, an actor in the film 'It ignited the nostalgia of Jerusalem from when I was a child.' Producers would not reveal production costs, but cranes and some expensive state-of-the-art cameras were deployed.
  • With less than a month left in tax season, Americans may be getting those phone calls that claim that the IRS will have a an arrest warrant issued. It’s all a scam, and the callers tried to scam the wrong person this time. Kyle Roder received a call from the “IRS” that threatened that he’d be arrested if he didn’t call back ASAP, The Huffington Post reported. >> Read more trending news That’s when Roder, an Eau Claire police officer, scammed the scammer. He called the number, having a co-worker record the call. Roder asked if the number he called was the IRS, saying that he had received a call stating that he committed fraud. The other man answered yes and asked for a case number. Roder said he was not given one, but the man said that wasn’t an issue. He could look it up with an address, CBS News reported. That’s when Roder started questioning the man, first asking how can he be arrested without an address, then asking how long until police showed up, The Huffington Post reported. He also asked what the man’s name was.  First it was given as James Maxwell, then James Johnson, and finally settled on James Maxwell Johnson. Eau Claire Police Department posted the video to its Facebook page where it has had nearly 4 million views. The IRS warns that the agency will not: Call without first sending a bill in the mail Demand that you pay taxes without questioning or appealing the amount Require that it has to be paid a certain way Threaten you with police  For more on the IRS phone call scam, click here.

News

  • One person was killed and two others were hospitalized after a shooting in DeKalb County. Police were called to the 700 block of Creste Drive overnight Wednesday, DeKalb police spokeswoman Shiera Campbell said. When they arrived, they found a man shot in a building breezeway. “The victim stated he had been walking along Snapfinger Woods Drive when four males in a white car tried to rob him,” Campbell said. “When he ran, they shot him.”  Soon after, officers got calls reporting two more shootings in the area. At Snapfinger Woods Drive and Shellbark Drive, they found a man dead inside a white Jeep. It had smashed into a tree, Campbell said. Less than a mile away, another shooting victim was found walking with his brother on Snapfinger Woods at Miller Road. The victim’s brother told police his brother was shot in the parking lot of a Texaco station. Investigators are trying to determine what led to the shootings and if they are related. The survivors, ages 26 and 18, were taken to Atlanta Medical Center, Campbell said. One of the victims was listed in critical condition and the other was listed as non-critical. Police are not releasing the names of the victims at this time, Campbell said. Detectives believe drugs are involved in at least one of the shootings, she said.  In other news:
  • Agriculture Secretary nominee Sonny Perdue on Thursday sought to reassure farm-state senators in both parties who are fearful about the impact of President Donald Trump's proposed deep cuts to farm programs, promising to promote agricultural trade and create jobs in the struggling industry. At his confirmation hearing, the former Georgia governor stressed bipartisanship, reaching out to Democrats who have complained about Trump's lack of experience in agriculture and his proposed 21 percent cut to the farm budget. 'In Georgia, agriculture is one area where Democrats and Republicans consistently reached across the aisle and work together,' Perdue said. He told Republican and Democratic senators concerned about Trump's trade agenda that 'trade is really the answer' for farmers dealing with low crop prices and said he would be a 'tenacious advocate and fighter' for rural America when dealing with the White House and other agencies. Perdue, 70, would be the first Southerner in the post for more than two decades. His rural roots — he is a farmer's son and has owned several agricultural companies — and his conciliatory tone have already won him support from some Democrats, including Michigan Sen. Debbie Stabenow, the top Democrat on the Senate Agriculture Committee, who said after the hearing that she will vote to confirm Perdue. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., has also said she will vote for him. But both women brought up concerns in the hearing, with Stabenow saying 'it's clear that rural America has been an afterthought' in the Trump administration. Stabenow said many rural communities are still struggling to recover from the Great Recession. 'Especially during these times of low prices for agriculture and uncertainty around budget, trade and immigration, we need the next secretary to be an unapologetic advocate for all of rural America,' she said. Farm-state Republicans have also criticized the proposed budget cuts and have been wary of the president's opposition of some trade agreements, as trade is a major economic driver in the agricultural industry. Senate Agriculture Chairman Pat Roberts, R-Kan., said at the hearing that producers need a market for their goods, and 'during this critical time, the importance of trade for the agriculture industry cannot be overstated.' Perdue noted a growing middle class around the world that is hungry for U.S. products. 'Food is a noble thing to trade,' Perdue said, adding that he would 'continue to tirelessly advocate that within the administration.' Trump has harshly criticized some international trade deals, saying they have killed American jobs. But farmers who make more than they can sell in the United States have heavily profited from those deals, and are hoping his anti-trade policies will include some exceptions for agriculture. Republican Sen. Steve Daines of Montana said Perdue's pro-trade comments were 'music to the ears of Montana farmers and ranchers.' Perdue also said he would work with the agriculture industry to create jobs and support landowners in their efforts to conserve farmland in a sustainable way. USDA is also responsible for nutrition programs, and congressional Republicans have signaled a willingness to trim the $70 billion food stamp program. Perdue signaled he may be supportive of those efforts, saying 'we hope we can do that even more efficiently and effectively than we have.' One of Perdue's main responsibilities will be working with Congress on a new five-year farm bill, and he pledged to help senators sustain popular crop insurance programs and fix what they see as problems with government dairy programs. Perdue was the last of Trump's Cabinet nominees to be chosen, and his nomination was delayed for weeks as the administration prepared his ethics paperwork. Perdue eventually said he would step down from several companies bearing his name to avoid conflicts of interest. Roberts said the committee will soon schedule a vote on Perdue's nomination, and it would then go to the floor. He and Trump's choice for labor secretary, Alexander Acosta, are two of the final nominees for Trump's Cabinet still pending in the Senate. Acosta was nominated in February after the withdrawal of the original nominee, Andrew Puzder.
  • Senate Democrats vowed Thursday to impede Judge Neil Gorsuch's path to the Supreme Court, setting up a political showdown with implications for future openings on the high court. Still irate that Republicans blocked President Barack Obama's nominee, Democrats consider Gorsuch a threat to a wide range of civil rights and think he was too evasive during 20 hours of questioning. Whatever the objections, Republicans who control the Senate are expected to ensure that President Donald Trump's pick reaches the bench, perhaps before the middle of April. The Democratic leader in the Senate, Chuck Schumer of New York, was among five senators to declare their opposition to Gorsuch Thursday, even before the Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination had ended. Schumer said he would lead a filibuster against Gorsuch, criticizing him as a judge who 'almost instinctively favors the powerful over the weak.' Schumer said the 49-year-old Coloradan would not serve as a check on Trump or be a mainstream justice. 'I have concluded that I cannot support Neil Gorsuch's nomination,' Schumer said on the Senate floor. 'My vote will be no and I urge my colleagues to do the same.' White House press secretary Sean Spicer called on Schumer to call off the filibuster, saying 'it represents the type of partisanship that Americans have grown tired of.' A Supreme Court seat has been open for more than 13 months, since the death of Justice Antonin Scalia. Like Scalia, Gorsuch has a mainly conservative record in more than 10 years as a federal appellate judge. Shortly before Schumer's announcement, Pennsylvania Sen. Bob Casey, who faces re-election next year in a state Trump won, also announced his opposition. Casey said he had 'serious concerns about Judge Gorsuch's rigid and restrictive judicial philosophy, manifest in a number of opinions he has written on the 10th Circuit.' Democratic Sens. Tom Carper of Delaware and Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent, also said they would vote against Trump's nominee, among at least 11 senators who say they will oppose Gorsuch in the face of pressure from liberals to resist all things Trump, including his nominees. No Democrat has yet pledged to support Gorsuch, but Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia has said he is open to voting for him. Manchin spoke Wednesday after watching the nominee emerge unscathed from testimony to the Judiciary Committee. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Democratic threats of delay, in the face of what he called Gorsuch's outstanding performance, stem from their base's refusal 'to accept the outcome of the election.' In an interview with The Associated Press on Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell seemed ready to change Senate rules, if necessary, to confirm Gorsuch with a simple majority rather than the 60 votes now required to move forward. Such a change also would apply to future Supreme Court nominees and would be especially important in the event that Trump gets to fill another opening and replace a liberal justice or Justice Anthony Kennedy, the court's so-called swing vote. In 2013, Democrats changed the rules to prohibit delaying tactics for all nominees other than for the high court. The Judiciary panel is expected to vote in the next two weeks to recommend Gorsuch favorably to the full Senate. Hearings for a Supreme Court nominee usually dominate Congress, but that's not been the case over the four days of hearings. The Republican push to dismantle Obama's Affordable Care Act and the controversy surrounding the investigation into contact between Trump associates and Russia overshadowed the hearings. On Thursday, lawyers, advocacy groups and former colleagues got their say on Gorsuch during the final session to examine his qualifications. The speakers included the father of an autistic boy whom Gorsuch ruled against. The Supreme Court, ruling in a separate case Wednesday, unanimously overturned the reasoning Gorsuch employed in his 2008 opinion. Gorsuch received the American Bar Association's highest rating after what ABA official Nancy Scott Degan called a 'deep and broad' investigation. But Degan acknowledged that her team did not review materials released by the Justice Department covering Gorsuch's involvement with Bush administration controversies involving the interrogation and treatment of terrorism detainees, broad assertions of executive power and warrantless eavesdropping on people within the United States. Some senators and civil rights advocates said emails and memos that were released raise serious questions that Gorsuch did not adequately address. Jameel Jaffer, former deputy director of the American Civil Liberties Union, said the Senate should not confirm Gorsuch without getting answers. 'This should not be a partisan issue,' Jaffer said. Among judges who have worked with him, U.S. District Judge John Kane praised Gorsuch's independence and cordiality. 'Judge Gorsuch is not a monk, but neither is he a missionary or an ideologue,' said Kane, an appointee of President Jimmy Carter. Democrats also took another opportunity to voice their displeasure at how Republicans kept Judge Merrick Garland, Obama's choice for the same seat, off the court. Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California noted that Garland also received the bar association's top rating, yet did not even get a committee hearing. ____ Associated Press writer Mary Clare Jalonick contributed to this report.
  • Tasharina Fluker and her daughter had just gotten to their Lithonia townhome Wednesday morning from celebrating the mother’s birthday. No less than an hour after they arrived, police say Fluker’s boyfriend, Michael Thornton, shot and killed her and daughter Janazia Miles.  A family member found one of them in the middle of the doorway and Miles’ 8-month-old son unharmed, Channel 2 Action News reported. It is not known how the relative entered the home.  Police were called to the scene about 3 a.m. after getting a person-down call on the 2000 block of Parkway Trail. The women were found with “no signs of life,” DeKalb police Lt. Rod Bryant said.  Thornton was later found at another location, police said. They have not described his relationship to the women, but neighbors said Thornton and Fluker were in a relationship and lived at the home. Neighbor Trocon Talhouk told Channel 2 he heard the couple arguing in the middle of the night.  “He kept saying: ‘All I want to do is get in the house,’” Talhouk said. “And then, shortly after that, I heard a car speed off and (the) next thing you know fire trucks and police cars were pulling up.”  It wasn’t the first time neighbors had heard domestic incidents at the home, Talhouk said.  “According to neighbors, (the two) fight all the time and he’s always beating (her),” he told Channel 2.  Fluker also leaves behind two sons — one in middle school and another who attends Grambling State University on a football scholarship he earned while playing for Miller Grove High School, the station reported. Police have not released other details.  In other news: