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National
Malta's Azure Window rock formation, featured on 'Game of Thrones,' collapses
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Malta's Azure Window rock formation, featured on 'Game of Thrones,' collapses

Malta's Azure Window rock formation, featured on 'Game of Thrones,' collapses
This is a April 2014 image of the landmark the Azure Window located just off Malta. (Caroline Hodgson via AP)

Malta's Azure Window rock formation, featured on 'Game of Thrones,' collapses

An iconic landmark featured on HBO's "Game of Thrones" is no more.

According to The Associated Press, Malta's Azure Window, a rock formation on the coast of Gozo, collapsed Wednesday amid storms and rough waters following years of erosion.

>> Read more trending news

​Prime Minister Joseph Muscat called the loss "heartbreaking."

"Reports commissioned over the years indicated that this landmark would be hard hit by unavoidable natural corrosion," he tweeted. "That sad day arrived."

Read more here.

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  • The Georgia Bulldogs are one win away from playing for the National Championship. If the Dawgs defeat the Oklahoma Sooners in the Rose Bowl on Jan. 1 in Pasadena, they’ll head to the College Football Playoff National Championship. Just the possibility that Georgia could reach the big game played at Atlanta’s Mercedes-Benz Stadium has driven prices dramatically higher on secondary ticket marketplaces since the four-team playoff field was set Dec. 3. Channel 2 Action News and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution are your home for everything Rose Bowl. Make sure to follow @WSBTV and @AJCSports for updates on Twitter & LIKE the official WSB-TV Facebook page! For much more on the Georgia Bulldogs, CLICK HERE to download and listen to Channel 2 Sports Director Zach Klein & AJC's Jeff Schultz on the ‘We Never Played the Game’ podcast. The current asking prices on secondary markets range from a low of $1,639 for an upper-level seat to a high of $15,807 for a club seat. If Georgia manages to beat Oklahoma, ticket demand would be off the charts whether they face Alabama or Clemson. Imagine UGA playing for a National Championship in the heart of Bulldog Nation. CLICK HERE to read myAJC’s full report.
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