LIVE AUDIO:

Joint Chiefs Chairman holds briefing on Niger ambush

SEVERE WEATHER:

Download the WSB Radio App and Charge Your Phone to Stay Connected

ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
72°
Thundershowers
H 70° L 67°
  • cloudy-day
    72°
    Current Conditions
    Thundershowers. H 70° L 67°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    70°
    Today
    Thundershowers. H 70° L 67°
  • clear-day
    66°
    Tomorrow
    Mostly Clear. H 66° L 51°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

National
Here's how to endorse a political candidate on Facebook
Close

Here's how to endorse a political candidate on Facebook

Here's how to endorse a political candidate on Facebook
LONDON, ENGLAND - MARCH 25: In this photo illustration the Social networking site Facebook is displayed on a laptop screen on March 25, 2009 in London, England. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Here's how to endorse a political candidate on Facebook

For those who use Facebook as an outlet to voice their political opinions, one feature makes the boldest statement: officially endorsing the candidate of your choice on the social media platform.

>> Read more trending stories  

To endorse a candidate, users only have to complete five steps: 

  1. Click the Endorsement tab on the political figure's Facebook page
  2. Click Endorse
  3. Choose the audience you want to see your endorsement post
  4. Write something to go along with your post
  5. Click Post

According to Facebook, users who post their endorsements to a public audience can be featured on candidates' pages if the candidates decide to repost any specific endorsement status.

Only pages that mark a figure as a politician, political candidate or government official can have the endorsement option.

Among those who can be endorsed are presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, Duke, a Great Pyrenees that won a third one-year term as honorary mayor of Cormorant, Minnesota, in August, and Mayor Stubbs, a cat that has been the mayor of Talkeetna, Alaska, since the 1990s.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

News

  • Two men are accused of pouring insecticide in the children's toy department of a Tennessee Walmart over the weekend, according to authorities. >> Read more trending news Millington police said the incident happened Sunday.  The men were seen on video 'vandalizing property and intentionally spilling insecticide chemicals in the children's toy department,' according to a news release. Officers said the men left the scene in a white pick-up truck that had two stripes down the center. Authorities continued to search for the men Monday.
  • A Buckhead woman says she feels like she's been 'robbed three times' after someone hacked her bank account. Pam Clay told Channel 2's Lori Wilson, someone named 'Sally Frazier' transferred thousands of dollars from their account to her account using the popular mobile banking app, Venmo. TRENDING STORIES: Attorney collapses, dies during closing arguments in murder trial Young father killed by rock thrown from overpass; Teens arrested Body of child discovered during search for missing 3-year-old Clay said the scammer cleared out her account and when she told Venmo what happened, a representative told her, it was a problem she had to address with her bank. Clay uses the app through her Wells Fargo account to send money to her son from time to time.  We've reached out to Venmo for comment on this story but have yet to hear a response. What the bank said about the app, on Channel 2 Action News at 5.  
  • A Utah woman wanted in connection with the death of her 13-day-old son was arrested in Atlanta, officials said Monday. >> Read more trending news Authorities found Maria Sullivan, 26, of Sandy, Utah, after she made “some concerning statements” to staff members at Northside Hospital-Cherokee, according to the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office. Sheriff’s spokeswoman Sgt. Marianne Kelley did not say what those statements were or why Sullivan was at the hospital. KSTU reported that she was seeking treatment but did not clarify what kind of treatment.  Hospital staff members notified a sergeant at the hospital about the troublesome statements, and the official learned Sullivan had warrants on suspicion of murder, endangerment of a child and three counts of child abuse.  Sullivan was discharged from the hospital and arrested just after 4:50 p.m. Sunday, Kelley said. According KSTU, Sullivan’s son, who was born on Sept. 4 with no known health problems, was pronounced dead Sept. 17 by medical responders. Media reports say the boy suffered broken ribs, bruising and bleeding on the brain. On the day of the child’s death, Sullivan left the boy in the sole care of her 21-year-old boyfriend, Dylan James Kitzmiller, while she called a friend to discuss her desire to “get away from Kitzmiller's abuse.” That same day, Sullivan said, she found Kitzmiller moving the child’s legs in a rough, awkward way. Later that night, Sullivan heard the child making noises and gasping for air before he stopped breathing, KSTU reported. Sullivan told police Kitzmiller abused the child and used heroin daily, KUTV reported. Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill said evidence showed Kitzmiller abused the boy and that Sullivan knew about it. “There were statements that the child was being handled roughly by the arm and shoulder -- that Kitzmiller would throw the baby up in the air (and) catch him in the air,” Gill said, according to KUTV. “The girlfriend indicated there was a level of abuse going on. She was aware of this abuse. She took no steps to stop this or to take the child to safety.” Sullivan is being held with no bond at the Cherokee County Adult Detention Center, Kelley said. Kitzmiller was arrested Saturday on the same charges as Sullivan, according to reports.
  • CBS is working on a reboot of its classic show “Magnum P.I.,” according to reports. >> Read more trending news The first eight seasons of the original series aired on CBS in the 1980s. The show starred Tom Selleck. The series reboot “follows Thomas Magnum (Selleck’s former role), a decorated ex-Navy SEAL who, upon returning home from Afghanistan, repurposes his military skills to become a private investigator. With help from fellow vets Theodore ‘TC’ Calvin and Orville ‘Rick’ Wright, as well as that of disavowed former MI:6 agent Juliet Higgins, Magnum takes on the cases no one else will, helping those who have no one else to turn to,” Variety magazine reported. The reboot has already been given a “pilot-production commitment” from the network, according to The Hollywood Reporter. It’s unclear whether Selleck will return for the reboot, but as he is currently under contract with CBS for the hit show “Blue Bloods,” it’s plausible that he could appear on the new “Magnum P.I.” The reboot comes after a recent attempt to revive the series flopped. Last year, ABC attempted to develop a sequel series, titled “Magnum,” which would have followed Magnum’s daughter who returns to Hawaii to take over her father’s P.I. firm. However, the show did not move beyond the development stage. The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.
  • Harvey Djerf , a 95-year-old World War II veteran, doesn’t let his age stop him from taking his daily walks. He takes the sojourns twice a day, all year long, and he’s been doing it for 65 years, Inside Edition reported. But his neighbors are keeping an eye out for Djerf. >> Read more trending news Every so often, a random chair has been left out for Djerf to take a load off when he’s out for his walks. “People saw me stopping and catching my breath,” Djerf told KARE. “They figured maybe Harvey needs a place to rest.” Tom and Melanie Heuerman saw Harvey taking a break in other neighbors’ chairs. That’s when they added another one to his route. The winter doesn’t stop Djerf, either, and his neighbors make sure Djerf can get safely to his seat by shoveling a path to his chairs, KARE reported. Djerf said his walks keep him going and give him something to do since his wife, 95, suffered a stroke last year and has been living at an assisted living facility, Inside Edition reported.
  • NEW YORK (AP) — Crying babies push the same 'buttons' in their mothers' brains no matter what their culture, a new study suggests. The research found that mothers in 11 countries tend to react the same way to their bawling child — by picking up and talking to the baby — and that the way mothers respond seems to be programmed into their brain circuits. An author of the study said he hopes the results will spur others to study brain responses in women who mistreat their children. Crying is a common trigger for abuse, said Marc Bornstein of the government's National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Bethesda, Maryland. The new results were released Monday by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The researchers analyzed videotapes of 684 mothers in 11 countries as they interacted with their infants, who were around 5 months old. The observations were done in Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Cameroon, France, Kenya, Israel, Italy, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Analysis showed that the mothers were likely to respond to crying by picking up and talking to the infant. But they were not likely to use other responses such as kissing, distracting, feeding or burping the child. Results were similar across the various countries. Next, researchers thought about what parts of the brain would likely be involved in the responses they saw. They focused on circuitry that's activated when a person plans to do or say something, other circuitry that could be involved in figuring out the meaning of a cry and on brain parts known to play critical roles in maternal caregiving. With brain scans, they found those brain areas were activated when 43 first-time mothers in the U.S. listened to recordings of their infants crying. Fifty mothers in China and Italy showed a similar result, with the Chinese moms showing different brain responses when they heard other sounds like infants laughing or babbling. But brains of six Italian women who were not mothers reacted differently to crying, Bornstein said in an email. 'Mothers, based on their personal experience, could easily have their brains shaped in a matter of a few months to be especially sensitive' to an infant's cry, perhaps because of hormonal changes that occur with parenting, he wrote. In fact, one contribution of Bornstein's work is that suggestion that brain development can continue beyond young adulthood, with motherhood as a key stimulus, commented Yale University researcher Linda Mayes, who did not participate in the study. Helena Rutherford of Yale, who also did not participate in the study, said the brain findings make sense, and that the study was significant for showing consistency across cultures in those responses and the behavior of the mothers. ___ Follow Malcolm Ritter at @MalcolmRitter His recent work can be found at http://tinyurl.com/RitterAP