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Traffic a big problem at state's largest school
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Traffic a big problem at state's largest school

Traffic a big problem at state's largest school
(Sandra Parrish/WSB Radio)

Traffic a big problem at state's largest school

Parents at Mill Creek High School in Gwinnett County are complaining loudly about the traffic around the state's largest school.

With nearly 4,000 students, wait times in the morning to get to school range from 45 minutes to an hour for some.

"I think it's kind of crazy when school starts at 7:20 that you have to get up at 5:30 in the morning just to be able to make it a mile-and-a-half down the road," says parent Julie Hemminger.

Gwinnett Commissioner Tommy Hunter, who is also a parent at the school, tells WSB's Sandra Parrish the county has added left and right turn signals at the school's entrance this year and so far it's helped.

He says unfortunately, it's the volume of the cars that's the problem.

"We're dumping a thousand cars in 45 minutes into one lane on campus and once you leave the stop bar at the signal, we can't control it; that belongs to the school," says Hunter.

He says at some point the county may look at adding an additional left turn lane and extending the right one, but likely not this year.

One mother, who didn't want to be identified, says at some point the county needs to look at adding another school.

"The area has grown so much in such a short amount of time and there's just not enough high schools," she says.

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