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Three arrested in Hood Mart drug bust
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Three arrested in Hood Mart drug bust

Three arrested in Hood Mart drug bust
Tips from customers led to a drug bust at the Hood Mart off Old National Hwy in south Fulton. (Channel 2)

Three arrested in Hood Mart drug bust

Police are investigating after a late-night SWAT raid in south Fulton County, where several men were arrested, including the business owner for drugs.

Channel 2’s Steve Gehlbach is off Old National Highway, where investigators spent most of the night gathering evidence at the Hood Mart. Complaints of drug activity prompted the investigation, said Fulton County Police Det. Melissa Parker.

With the help of the U.S. Marshal's Fugitive Task Force and Georgia State Patrol, south Fulton police found drugs, guns and other illegal items inside the store.

Detectives said they served multiple search warrants and arrest warrants.

Police said hundreds of people come to the gas station each morning and evening, so the customers’ tips paid off.

"Our investigators have taken every tip and every complaint to heart and wanted to build investigation enough before execute this search warrant so it would all go well," Parker said.

The store's owner Michael Hobby, and two other men, Anthony Champion and Steaddrick Shivers, were all arrested on drug charges. More charges are expected, Parker said.

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