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Skeletal remains found in Cherokee County

Cherokee County authorities need help identifying a body that was discovered Saturday afternoon.

A biologist searching for snakes found the skeletal remains of a human body off South Cherokee Lane in Woodstock, and detectives arrived on the scene around 6 p.m., Lt. Jay Baker with the sheriff’s office said Sunday.

The body appears to be that of a man who was wearing size 13, red Adidas tennis shoes, Baker said. Blue jeans and burgundy shorts also were found with the remains. Investigators do not yet know how long the body was in the woods.

The remains will be sent to the GBI crime lab for analysis, Baker said.

Cherokee sheriff’s officials said they do not having any cases of missing people that fit this investigation.

Anyone with information on the case should call 911.

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News

  • Police say a man wanted for murdering his wife inside their home on Medlock Park Drive turned himself in Saturday afternoon. Gwinnett County police were there in Snellville investigating the murder Thursday night after a 12-year-old boy found his mother's body. 'The crime probably occurred between the hours of 5 p.m. and 9 p.m.,' Gwinnett County police Cpl. Michele Pihera, said. Officers said they received a call from the 12-year-old who said his mother was dead. The victim's son told detectives he was outside playing and saw his stepfather drive off around 9 p.m. Police said the boy then went inside and found the mother of six dead from one gunshot wound in the master bedroom of the home. 'The child was not at the home when the shooting took place,' said police. The victim was identified as Erica Powell, 46, and the suspect has been identified as Walter J. Lowe, 51, who was the victim's husband and the boy's stepfather. TRENDING STORIES: Woman shot outside Starbucks in Cobb County Police: Burglar thought he cut security wires, still caught on camera 10-year-old girl hit, killed while walking to store Authorities told Channel 2's Steve Gehlbach that they don't know yet what led up to the murder, but think the woman was shot during a domestic disturbance. 'They do have a domestic violence history,' an officer told Gehlbach. It's not the first time Lowe has been accused of family violence. A police report documented an incident two years ago at the home where Lowe was charged with battery and terroristic threats against Erica in front of two of her sons, including the then 10-year-old boy.
  • Actor John Heard, best known for playing the dad in the “Home Alone” movies, has died, TMZ reported. US Weekly confirmed the report. Heard was found dead in a California hotel Friday, according to TMZ. He was 72. >> Read more trending news The cause of death is unknown, but TMZ reports that Heard had minor surgery on Wednesday, and was staying at the hotel while recovering. Heard’s acting career included film, television and stage credits. While best known for playing father Peter McCallister in “Home Alone,” other film credits include “Big” and 'Beaches,' while television credits include “The Sopranos” and “Prison Break.” This is a breaking news story, return for updates.
  • The family of a father gunned down in Cobb County this week is calling for justice.Dozens gathered Friday night for a vigil to remember Roland Milton III, 29, as police continue to search for clues.Police say four men wearing ski masks shot Milton on Wednesday in the parking lot of the Crescent Square Apartments on Austell Road.Investigators believe robbery was the likely motive. TRENDING STORIES: FREE things to do this week: Ice cream festival, hiking & movies Unsecure handcuffs, toothbrush aided in prisoners' deadly escape, authorities say 10-year-old walks in, finds mom shot to death The victim's brother, Bishop Eusebio Phelps, said he is 'still wishing this was a bad dream; hoping that I'm going to wake up and this not all be true.'Friends and family gathered on the basketball court where Milton used to play to honor his memory.'It hasn't been easy. Just a lot of support from our family and friends and a lot of prayer,' said the victim's mother, Dorthea Milton-NationFamily members believe the vigil will help them get justice.'We're definitely calling for justice in this case. We want to keep his memory alive,' Phelps said.Milton's family said he loved everyone, especially his three young daughters.'That kid was full of life and he had a big heart. He helped his community. He helped his neighborhood. He was all about love,' said Scott Jackson, the victim's godfather.The family is offering a $5,000 reward for any information that leads to arrests in the case.
  • A 95-year-old great-great-grandmother got the thrill of a lifetime when two firefighters came for a visit to her Georgia home.Irene Grundy, who is bedbound and receiving hospice care, had been wanting to see the two firemen to thank them since they helped her to safety during a tornado scare in April. But, she didn't know their names or how to contact them.Her daughter, Victoria Glance, reached out to Wish of a Lifetime, a national nonprofit dedicated to fulfilling life-enriching wishes for seniors to combat isolation, for help in finding the two men and arranging a special visit for her mother.The organization found the firefighters, Julius Holinek and Andy Poteet, at Alpharetta Fire Station 81, and quickly planned their visit with Grundy.'Look at my handsome firemen!' Grundy exclaimed when they came through the door. TRENDING STORIES: FREE things to do this week: Ice cream festival, hiking & movies Unsecure handcuffs, toothbrush aided in prisoners' deadly escape, authorities say 10-year-old walks in, finds mom shot to death The two brought bouquets donated by a local florist, posed for photos, and visited with Grundy and her family.Irene proudly showed off intricate feathered hats she used to make for her church friends in the 1950s, and kept the firemen laughing with jokes that produced belly laughs. '(This experience) boosted her morale,' said her daughter. 'It was a miracle. It changed her whole attitude (and) brightened up her life.'Grundy's daughter, Victoria, was moved by how the community came together to celebrate her mother during a difficult time for their family.'It seemed like a family gathering, and we all hugged at the end,' she said.'Even the guy who delivered food gave her a kiss on the cheek and wished her well.'Grundy spent her life caring for others. She raised four children, has 15 grandchildren, 28 great-grandchildren and 10 great-great-grandchildren.She is now receiving all the care she deserves with this outpouring of love from her family and the community of Alpharetta, her daughter said.
  • Lucy Harris thinks Britain's decision to leave the European Union is a dream come true. Nick Hopkinson thinks it's a nightmare. The two Britons — a 'leave' supporter and a 'remainer' — represent the great divide in a country that stepped into the unknown just over a year ago, when British voters decided by 52 percent to 48 percent to end more than four decades of EU membership. They are also as uncertain as the rest of the country about what Brexit will look like, and even when it will happen. Since the shock referendum result, work on negotiating the divorce from the EU has slowed to a crawl as the scale and complexity of the challenge becomes clearer. Harris, founder of the pro-Brexit group Leavers of London, says she is hopeful, rather than confident, that Britain will really cut its ties with the EU. 'If we haven't finalized it, then anything's still up for grabs,' she said. 'Everything is still to play for.' She's not the only Brexiteer, as those who support leaving the EU are called, to be concerned. After an election last month clipped the wings of Britain's Conservative government, remainers are gaining in confidence. 'Since the general election I've been more optimistic that at least we're headed toward soft Brexit, and hopefully we can reverse Brexit altogether,' said Hopkinson, chairman of pro-EU group London4Europe. 'Obviously the government is toughing it out, showing a brave face. But I think its brittle attitude toward Brexit will break and snap.' Many on both sides of the divide had assumed the picture would be clearer by now. But the road to Brexit has not run smoothly. First the British government lost a Supreme Court battle over whether a vote in Parliament was needed to begin the Brexit process. Once the vote was held, and won, Prime Minister Theresa May's Conservative government officially triggered the two-year countdown to exit, starting a race to untangle four decades of intertwined laws and regulations by March 2019. Then, May called an early election in a bid to strengthen her hand in EU negotiations. Instead, voters stripped May's Conservatives of their parliamentary majority, severely denting May's authority — and her ability to hold together a party split between its pro-and anti-EU wings. Since the June 8 election, government ministers have been at war, providing the media with a string of disparaging, anonymously sourced stories about one another. Much of the sniping has targeted Treasury chief Philip Hammond, the most senior minister in favor of a compromise 'soft Brexit' to cushion the economic shock of leaving the bloc. The result is a disunited British government and an increasingly impatient EU. EU officials have slammed British proposals so far as vague and inadequate. The first substantive round of divorce talks in Brussels last week failed to produce a breakthrough, as the EU's chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, said Britain must clarify its positions in key areas. Barnier said 'fundamental' differences remain on one of the biggest issues — the status of 3 million EU citizens living in Britain and 1 million U.K. nationals who reside in other European countries. A British proposal to grant permanent residency to Europeans in the U.K. was dismissed by the European Parliament as insufficient and burdensome. There's also a fight looming over the multibillion-euro bill that Britain must pay to meet previous commitments it made as an EU member. British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson recently asserted the bloc could 'go whistle' if it thought Britain would settle a big exit tab. 'I am not hearing any whistling. Just the clock ticking,' Barnier replied. EU officials insist there can be no discussion of a future trade deal with Britain until 'sufficient progress' has been made on citizens' rights, the exit bill and the status of the Irish border. 'We don't seem to be much further on now than we were just after the referendum,' said Tim Bale, professor of politics at Queen Mary University of London. 'I'm not sure anybody knows just how this is going to go. I'm not sure the government has got its negotiating goals sorted. I'm not sure the EU really knows what (Britain's goals) are either. 'I think we are going to find it very, very hard to meet this two-year deadline before we crash out.' The prospect of tumbling out of the bloc — with its frictionless single market in goods and services — and into a world of tariffs and trade barriers has given Britain's economy the jitters. The pound has lost more than 10 percent of its value against the dollar in the last year, economic growth has slowed and manufacturing output has begun to fall. Employers' organization the Confederation of British Industry says the uncertainty is threatening jobs. The group says to ease the pain, Britain should remain in the EU's single market and customs union during a transitional period after Brexit. That idea has support from many lawmakers, both Conservative and Labour, but could bring the wrath of pro-Brexit Conservatives down on the already shaky May government. That could trigger a party leadership challenge or even a new election — and more delays and chaos. In the meantime, there is little sign the country has heeded May's repeated calls to unite. A post-referendum spike in hate crimes against Europeans and others has subsided, but across the country families have fought and friendships have been strained over Brexit. 'It has created divisions that just weren't there,' said Hopkinson, who calls the forces unleashed by Brexit a 'nightmare.' On that, he and Harris agree. Harris set up Leavers of London as a support group after finding her views out of synch with many others in her 20-something age group. 'I was fed up with being called a xenophobe,' she said. 'You start this conversation and it gets really bad very quickly.' She strongly believes Britain will be better off outside the EU. But, she predicts: 'We're in for a bumpy ride, both sides.' ___ Follow Jill Lawless on Twitter at http://Twitter.com/JillLawless
  • A Georgia man who was knee-deep in the ocean got hit by a wave and later died, according to police. The incident occurred along 24th Avenue at 7:58 a.m. Sunday. The Myrtle Beach Police Department said the 35-year-old Gainesville man was in the ocean with a young family member when a wave crashed over him. TRENDING STORIES: 2-year-old found wandering alone reunited with family Did you win the $3.8M jackpot in the Georgia Lottery? Man with multiple gunshot wounds found dead behind wheel of car A lifeguard from John's Beach Service, who had arrived at the beach early for his shift, and a family member rescued the man from the ocean. The lifeguard, an off-duty EMT and a police officer performed CPR on the male. An ambulance transported him to the hospital where he died.