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Fan Found Sleeping at Bieber's House

It wasn't Goldilocks but an overzealous fan of Justin Bieber's found sleeping in his Sandy Springs home.

 

Police were called to the house on Northside Drive after the Doraville woman was found asleep in a bedroom.

 

"The house belongs to music producer Dallas Austin," says Sandy Springs Police Captain Steve Rose, "and one of his family members found the woman, in bed, sleeping."

 

Rose tells WSB the woman told that family member, and police, that she came to the house for Bieber's birthday party.

 

"They informed her that the party had taken place a few days earlier," Rose says, "and that it had been held somewhere else."

 

It was later determined that  Qianying Zhao, 23, was actually just a big fan of the singer.

 

"It was determined that she's one of his Twitter followers," says Rose.  "One of millions."

 

Zhao told police she entered into the jnoccupied home through an unlocked door.

 

She's been charged with misdemeanor criminal trespass.  No one was injured in the incident.

 

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News

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