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Columbia HS senior killed outside Decatur apartment complex
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Columbia HS senior killed outside Decatur apartment complex

Columbia HS senior killed outside Decatur apartment complex

Columbia HS senior killed outside Decatur apartment complex

DeKalb County police are searching for the person responsible for shooting and killing a high school student who was months from graduation.

Family members told Channel 2’s Amanda Cook that the victim, 18-year-old Dominique Boyer, was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Boyer was shot at the Austin Oaks complex on Glenwood Road in Decatur Thursday night.

The teen’s aunt, Lawanda Boyer, told Cook that her nephew was due to graduate from Columbia High School in May.

“I still want to find my nephew’s killer, who done this,” Lawanda Boyer said.

Lawanda Boyer said she believes the gunman intended to shoot someone else. She is begging anyone with information to call police.

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  • The Latest on the Republican legislation overhauling the Obama health care law (all times EDT): 7:15 p.m. Threats of opposition from three Republican senators are casting doubt on whether GOP leaders have enough support to move ahead on the Senate health care bill. The Senate has to hold a procedural vote to move forward, most likely on Wednesday. Sen. Susan Collins of Maine tweeted after the Congressional Budget Office analysis on Monday that the Senate bill won't fix the flaws in the current bill. She says she will vote no on the 'motion to proceed.' Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin says he has 'a hard time believing I'll have enough information for me to support a motion to proceed this week.' Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky says it's worse to 'pass a bad bill than to pass no bill.' Republicans can't afford more than two defections. ___ 6:35 p.m. The White House says the Congressional Budget Office's projection that 22 million more people will be uninsured in 2026 'must not be trusted blindly.' The White House is again trying to undermine the analysis of the CBO, questioning the office's predictions that millions of more Americans would be uninsured under a Senate health care proposal compared with President Barack Obama's health care law. The White House says the CBO 'has consistently proven it cannot accurately predict how health care legislation will impact insurance coverage.' It says the office has a 'history of inaccuracy,' and cites its 'flawed report on coverage, premiums and predicted deficit arising out of Obamacare.' ___ 6:30 p.m. Hawaii Democratic Sen. Mazie Hirono is decrying the Republican health care bill as 'mean, ugly' a day ahead of her own surgery. Speaking on the Senate floor Monday, Hirono says people typically figure health insurance is a concern for someone else until they get sick. Hirono announced in May that she was being treated for kidney cancer. She says she will have surgery Tuesday to remove a lesion on her rib. But first she joined several Democratic senators in criticizing the GOP health care bill, saying it was a 'tax cut for the rich bill.' Hirono says health care is a right, not a privilege. And in light of the budget analysis that found 22 million more Americans would be uninsured, Hirono says, 'it's as bad as we thought.' ___ 6 p.m. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is focusing on the tax cuts, deficit reduction and lower premiums cited in a nonpartisan analysis of the Senate's health care bill, and making no mention of the 22 million more Americans who would be uninsured. McConnell put out a brief statement Monday after the release of the Congressional Budget Office report. He says Americans need relief from the 'failed Obamacare law,' and says the Senate will soon act on a bill to give Americans better care. The Kentucky Republican says the bill would lower premiums by 30 percent in 2020, cut taxes by $700 billion and reduce the deficit by $331 billion. His statement omits any mention of the CBO prediction that 22 million more Americans would be uninsured in 2026 than under President Barack Obama's health care law. ___ 4:20 p.m. The Senate health care bill would result in 22 million more uninsured Americans over the next decade compared to current law. That's according to an analysis Monday from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. The figure may further complicate Senate GOP leaders' plans to pass their bill this week. It's barely an improvement upon the health care bill that passed the House — which would have resulted in 23 million more uninsured. Several GOP senators have said they want to see their bill cover more people than the House version. And President Donald Trump himself called the House bill 'mean' — though he's lent his support to the Senate version and is lobbying for passage. ___ 2:15 p.m. The nation's largest doctors' group is outlining its opposition to the Senate Republican health care bill. The American Medical Association sent a letter Monday to Senate leaders saying the draft legislation violates the medical oath to 'first, do no harm.' The letter says the Republican plan is likely to lead to higher costs and greater difficulty in affording care for low- and middle-income patients. The doctors' group says the Senate bill's Medicaid payment formulas threaten to 'limit states' ability to address the health care needs of their most vulnerable citizens' and won't keep up with new medical innovations and epidemics such as the opioid addiction crisis. The letter is signed by Dr. James L. Madara, the group's CEO. The AMA has about a quarter-million members. __ 2 p.m. One of the nation's biggest health insurers says the Senate health care bill will 'markedly improve' the individual insurance market's stability and moderate premium hikes. Blue Cross-Blue Shield insurer Anthem says the bill will help in part by appropriating money for cost-sharing reduction payments and eliminating a health insurance tax. Cost-sharing reduction payments help cover expenses like deductibles for people with modest incomes. President Donald Trump has discussed ending these payments, and insurers planning to return to the exchanges next year want a guarantee that the payments also will return. Anthem Inc. sells coverage in key markets like New York and California. It has said tough market conditions have forced it to pull out of exchanges in three states for 2018: Ohio, Wisconsin and Indiana. __ 1:10 p.m. Senate Republicans have issued a revised version of their health care bill. The changes include a penalty for people who let their insurance lapse. Under the new package, people who lacked coverage for at least 63 days in the past year and then buy a policy would face a six-month delay before it takes effect. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell released his initial measure last week. It had no penalty for people who let their coverage expire. The waiting period is designed to prompt healthy people who might not otherwise buy insurance to do so. That helps insurance companies pay for sicker customers who are more expensive to cover. McConnell is hoping to push the measure through the Senate by the end of this week, but some Republicans are rebelling. __ 12:55 p.m. An outside group backing President Donald Trump will begin targeting more Republican holdouts on the Senate's health care bill. America First Policies is expanding its campaign against Nevada Sen. Dean Heller to include Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, Utah Sen. Mike Lee and Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson. Those lawmakers came out against the bill as written when it was made public last week. A senior official with America First Policies says online and social media ads will remind voters that Republicans have promised to repeal President Barack Obama's signature health care legislation. The official demanded anonymity to discuss the plan. The group also is preparing radio and television ads to run ahead of the vote, which could come at the end of this week. — Julie Bykowicz __ 11:19 a.m. A conservative Republican senator who doesn't back the GOP health care bill is using unusually sharp tones to criticize party leaders. Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson is accusing top Republicans of trying to jam the legislation through the Senate. He says the leadership effort is 'a little offensive' and says conservatives haven't had input into the proposal. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell introduced legislation last week rolling back much of President Barack Obama's health care law. Johnson is among four conservatives and a moderate who said they don't back the measure but haven't ruled out supporting it if it's changed. McConnell is working this week to make revisions to win over votes. The bill will win approval if just two of the 52 Senate Republicans support it. All Democrats oppose it. __ 10:54 a.m. A nonpartisan group representing Republican and Democratic state officials who administer Medicaid programs says the GOP health care legislation advancing toward a Senate vote will not work. In a strongly worded statement that reflects the 'unanimous' views of its board, the National Association of Medicaid Directors said the Republican health care bill would be 'a transfer of risk, responsibility, and cost to the states of historic proportions.' While the group's members differ over the concept of federal spending limits on the health program for low-income people, the board agreed that the inflation adjustments in the Senate bill 'are insufficient and unworkable.' Medicaid has become perhaps the key sticking point in the congressional debate. The group said Congress should focus on stabilizing insurance markets for now, and tackle Medicaid overhaul later in a more thoughtful manner. __ 2:54 a.m. Senate Republicans skeptical about a GOP health overhaul bill are expressing some doubt about holding a vote on the measure this week. Lawmakers are awaiting a key analysis from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. President Donald Trump is making a final push to fulfill a key campaign promise, insisting that Republicans are not 'that far off' and signaling that last-minute changes are coming to win votes. So far, five Republican senators are expressing opposition to the Senate GOP plan that would scuttle much of former President Barack Obama's health law. That's more than enough to torpedo the measure developed in private by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. The holdouts are expressing willingness to negotiate, but many of them are pushing revisions that could risk alienating moderate Republicans in the process.
  • Police are looking for the person who sprayed bullets into a home filled with children. Newnan police told Channel 2 Action News that four girls were inside the home on Reynolds Street having a sleepover when someone outside fired a gun into the home around 11:30 p.m. Two of the girls, both 11, were hit by gunfire. 'We ask you to have a heart, understand that we want to speak to you. We will hopefully track down leads and locate you and this is your opportunity to come forward and let us know what happened in your own words,' Newnan Deputy Police Chief Mark Cooper said. Kocoyo Elder, who lives in the neighborhood, was home watching TV with her grandkids when she heard the gunshots. 'We paused the TV and we heard the sirens, and we came on the porch and saw a lot of police and there were a lot of people walking this way,' she said as she described the scene to Channel 2's Lori Wilson. One of the girls was hit in the cheek. The other was shot in the thigh. They were taken to Children's Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston. Both are listed as stable. TRENDING STORIES: From Mexico to metro Atlanta: Bust nets $1M in meth, $250K in cash Teen missing for more than a year found at Duluth home Police continue to search for duo seen punching woman, daughter One of the girl's mothers was home at the time. 'When you arrive and you find that two 11-year-old girls were enjoying a sleepover with family and friends and they've been shot now, that tugs at your heart,' Cooper said. Investigators believe the gun used was a 9mm. Police were able to count seven bullet holes in the home. 'I couldn't sleep until I got up this morning and knew they were OK,' one of the mothers said. Neighbors are hoping for justice, but worry about an attempt at retaliation. 'It grieves my spirit knowing that two young ladies could have possibly lost their life in this area. That's not right,' said Pastor Render Godfrey, who lives in the area. More than anything, they want the violence to stop. One neighbor, who asked Wilson to use her first name Jackie, says she constantly worries living in this area. 'I've been terrified for years because every other month there's always something going on,' she said.
  • The son of former Atlanta Braves infielder Keith Lockhart is fighting for his life after he was hit in the face with a baseball.According to a post by the family on social media, Jason Lockhart, 15, was hit on June 17 when he was playing in a baseball tournament in South Carolina.Channel 2 Action News has learned when Lockhart touched home plate, the catcher was throwing the ball back to the pitcher. It hit Jason in the face, breaking his nose.In a Facebook post written by his sister, we learned Jason was initially given stitches but on June 19 when he visited the doctor's office for X-rays, his nose began to bleed profusely. Doctors could not stop the bleeding and even after going to urgent care, he was ultimately taken to the Scottish Rite hospital in Atlanta.A CT scan determined the fracture was more severe than doctors originally thought. The results showed a laceration on his artery. Sydney Lockhart says a surgeon was brought in to stitch up a laceration in his nose and reset his broken nose the next day.In an update on Wednesday, Sydney Lockhart wrote that an artery was cut by the fracture and Jason was sedated for two days. He was put on a ventilator to help his body rest but the bleeding continued.On Friday, he was heavily sedated in a paralytic state and put on life support so doctors could monitor and contain any bleeding. In Facebook post written by his mother, she said doctors determined the blood was coming from his nose, not his brain. Jason also developed a fever, which doctors say is common when the body is fighting a condition as severe as this.Jason was originally scheduled to have surgery Monday but doctors have moved it to Tuesday according to his sister's Facebook page. Sydney Lockhart says although there was no bleeding since Sunday's surgery, his body is responding a bit slower than anticipated. Doctors are also backing off several medications, according to the post written Monday afternoon.The procedure is to remove and replace packing in his nose and will closely look inside to figure out if there is an area behind the packing that could cause more bleeding. TRENDING STORIES: From Mexico to metro Atlanta: Bust nets $1M in meth, $250K in cash Teen missing for more than a year found at Duluth home Police continue to search for duo seen punching woman, daughter Support has been flooding social media with messages from inside the baseball community to friends and family.Keith Lockhart played several seasons for the Braves.Braves Vice Chairman John Schuerholz issued a statement on Twitter offering prayers for Jason and his family and encouraged fans to do the same.The family asks for prayers and support saying:We are really staying positive that this is the best way to give Jason the most comfort possible and the least stress. Thank you again for standing with us in the biggest and scariest situation our family has ever encountered. With Love and Appreciation, The Lockhart family Our top 3 requests or goals right now are: 1. Keeping Jason at this calm paralytic state with no movements 2. No bleeding 3. Making it to Monday and letting Jason's body do all the clotting itself Thanks so much for all the outpouring prayers & support for Jay. It's been rough, a few surgeries but we're confident he's going to be ok.-- Keith Lockhart (@klocky7) June 24, 2017 Jason had a good night last night still had some bleeding but manageable no surgery. Hoping and praying for the same today.#staystrongJ-- Keith Lockhart (@klocky7) June 24, 2017 Jason just came out of surgery Dr.'s located 3 areas of bleeding &stopped the flow of blood. We are all encouraged about today!#staystrongJ-- Keith Lockhart (@klocky7) June 25, 2017 I don't think y'all understand how much of a champion this child is 💛 pic.twitter.com/TaGn7XPFq5-- syds (@SydneyLockhart) June 21, 2017 Braves Vice Chairman John Schuerholz statement on Jason Lockhart, son of Braves alumni @klocky7: pic.twitter.com/JiIxyZgoN1-- Atlanta Braves (@Braves) June 26, 2017
  • The reviews from around the globe are in and they show scant confidence outside the United States in President Donald Trump's ability to do the right thing on international affairs, with fewer than 3 in 10 respondents expressing confidence, according to a Pew Research Center survey of attitudes toward Trump in more than three dozen countries. Most of those surveyed also disapprove of Trump's major policies, including his promise to erect a physical wall along the border between the U.S. and Mexico, and temporarily halting travel from six mostly Muslim countries. In terms of personal traits, more than half see the U.S. president as a strong leader, but that positive view is outweighed by larger majorities who describe the real estate developer and former reality TV star as arrogant, intolerant or dangerous. Among the 37 countries Pew surveyed, Trump scored higher marks than his predecessor, President Barack Obama, in two: Russia and Israel. Pew has produced this survey annually since 2002, starting with the first term of George W. Bush. The edition released late Monday is the first conducted since Trump took office in January. According to the survey, a median of 22 percent across all the countries surveyed expressed confidence that Trump will do the right thing when it comes to international affairs. That means that if the results from each country are ranked in order, 22 percent is the midpoint, with the percentage expressing confidence in Trump falling above or below that point in equal numbers of countries. The 22 percent rating marks a steep drop from the closing years of Obama's presidency, when a median of 64 percent expressed confidence in Obama' ability to direct America's role in the world. Trump's largest base of support comes from Filipinos, 69 percent of whom say they have confidence in him. Nations in which more than half of the public offers positive opinions of Trump include Nigeria and Vietnam, 58 percent each; Israel, 56 percent and Russia, 53 percent. The results are based on telephone and face-to-face interviews conducted among 40,447 respondents in 37 countries in all regions of the world between Feb. 16 and May 8. Bush's ratings fell after the U.S. invaded Iraq in 2003 and never fully recovered in some countries. Across 26 nations that Pew surveyed near the end of Bush's term, a median of only 27 percent had confidence in Bush's ability to handle international affairs. Ratings for America's president rose in 2009 after Obama took office. There was a dip in confidence in some countries that coincided with Obama's increased use of drone strikes and a National Security Agency spying scandal, but Obama enjoyed a median confidence rating of 64 percent across 37 countries surveyed near the end of his second term. The survey found widespread disapproval of some of Trump's major policies. The promised U.S.-Mexico border wall is opposed by a median of 76 percent across the 37 countries, rising to 94 percent in Mexico. More than 7 in 10 disagree with Trump's proposals to pull the U.S. out of a landmark climate change agreement and withdraw from multinational trade deals such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Trump has pulled the U.S. out of both agreements, although the survey was conducted before his June 2 announcement on exiting the Paris climate accord. More than 60 percent disapprove of Trump's proposal for a temporary ban on people entering the U.S. from certain majority Muslim countries. More than half the respondents in four countries — Hungary, Israel, Poland and Russia — support the proposal. Opposition was strong in several largely Muslim countries, including Jordan, Lebanon and Senegal. U.S. courts had blocked two versions of Trump's travel ban, but he won a partial victory Monday when the U.S. Supreme Court allowed the administration to go forward with a limited version of the ban. The high court also agreed to hear arguments in the case in October. The ban applies to visitors from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. The Pew survey also found opposition to Trump's proposal to withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal, which he has yet to act on. While 55 percent see Trump as a strong leader, larger majorities of those surveyed said they see him as arrogant, 75 percent; intolerant, 65 percent; and dangerous, 62 percent. Amid federal and congressional investigations into possible election-year coordination between Trump and Russian government officials, Russia is one of two countries to give Trump higher marks than it did Obama. Israel also scored Trump higher than Obama. Obama fell out of favor with Israel after negotiating the nuclear deal with Iran, an enemy of the Jewish state. ___ Follow Darlene Superville on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dsupervilleap
  • Brazil's attorney general formally accused President Michel Temer of corruption on Monday, making him the first sitting president in Latin America's largest nation to face criminal charges. Attorney General Rodrigo Janot's accusation is the latest salvo in an intensifying showdown between Temer and justice officials who are building a corruption case that reaches to the highest levels. The case now goes to the lower Chamber of Deputies in Congress, which must decide whether it has merit. If two-thirds of the legislature decides that it does, then the president will be suspended for up to 180 days while a trial is conducted. House Speaker Rodrigo Maia, an ally of Temer, would be president in the interim. In his decision, Janot said that Temer at some point between March and April of this year took a bribe of around $150,000 offered by Joesly Batista, former chairman of meat-packing giant JBS. Janot opened an investigation last month into Temer for corruption, obstruction of justice and being part of a criminal organization. A recording emerged that apparently captured Temer, in a conversation with Batista, endorsing hush money to former House Speaker Eduardo Cunha, a former Temer ally who is serving a 15-year sentence for corruption. Batista reached a plea agreement with federal prosecutors. Temer has denied wrongdoing and said he refuses to resign despite numerous calls for him to do so and plunging popularity. Janot's decision to put forward only the corruption allegation may be a strategy to force the lower Chamber of Deputies to first deal with it before having to consider the other allegations. Allies of Temer have been torn between whether to continue supporting the beleaguered leader or bail on him because of fears that association could be toxic during elections next year. Earlier Monday, Temer sought to show his government conducting business as usual, defiantly saying he wasn't going anywhere in his first comments since returning from a trip to Russia and Norway last week that was filled with gaffes and mounting bad news. 'Nothing will destroy us. Not me and not our ministers,' he said during the ceremonial signing of a bill in the capital of Brasilia. Temer also said that Congress must continue with his proposed reforms to the labor laws and pension system, unpopular measures aimed at helping Latin America's largest economy recover from a deep recession. 'There is no Plan B. We have to move forward,' said Temer. Despite the optimism, Temer is facing risks to his mandate on several fronts, from tanking popularity to numerous calls, including from heavyweight politicians, for him to step down. His trip last week to Russia and Norway ended up underscoring the president's problems and Brazil's diminished stature overseas thanks to a steady stream of corruption scandals the last three years. Few people showed up at the reception at Brazil's embassy in Moscow, no top Norwegian officials welcomed Temer at Oslo's airport and the country's prime minister, Erna Solberg, gave Temer a public lecture about the colossal 'Car Wash' investigation that has upended Brazilian politics and could even jail Temer and several of his Cabinet ministers. Launched in March 2014, the investigation into billions of dollars in inflated construction contracts and kickbacks to politicians has landed dozens of the country's elite in jail and threatens many more. 'We are very concerned about the 'Car Wash' probe,' said Solberg, adding that it was important for Brazil to 'cleanup' corruption. To top it off, during Temer's visit, Norway announced a 50 percent cut in funds it pays into Brazil's Amazon rainforest fund because of increased deforestation. The increased deforestation began before Temer took power last year, but environmentalists argue his policies are aggravating the situation. 'It was a trip to distract people from the problems in politics,' said Mauricio Santoro, a political scientist at the State University of Rio de Janeiro. 'It ended up being a disaster.' Temer, who took over in May of last year after President Dilma Rousseff was impeached and later removed from office, now also has the dubious distinction of having the lowest approval rating of a president since 1989. The Datafolha polling institute showed over the weekend that just 7 percent of those questioned approved of Temer's administration, the worst since the country was embroiled in a crisis of hyper-inflation on the watch of President Jose Sarney. Even stalwart allies have begun to bail on Temer. Former President Fernando Henrique Cardoso, who initially supported Temer and is a key leader of the junior coalition party, said in an article published by daily Folha de S.Paulo on Monday that the president could end the crisis by ushering in new elections sooner than the end of his mandate, which goes through 2018. 'I plead with the president to meditate over the opportunity of such a gesture of greatness,' said Cardoso. ___ Follow Peter Prengaman: http://www.twitter.com/peterprengaman Follow Mauricio Savarese: https://www.twitter.com/MSavarese
  • DeKalb County Watershed Management crews are cleaning and repairing 53 miles of main sewer lines, marking the first time the maintenance work has been undertaken in a half-century. The driving motivation for the cleanup is a 2020 deadline,set under a 2011 Environmental Protection Agency consent decree, after numerous sewage spills. Local business leaders say cleared sewer lines will not only help the environment, but also the economy. 'When your sewer lines are clogged, when you have insufficient capacity, developers go elsewhere,' said Michael Paris, with the Council for Quality Growth. 'The competition is heavy across the region. And cities and counties that can provide the infrastructure that works, get the jobs, get the housing, get the development.' To clear the pipes, harnessed crews must sometimes be lowered into the sewer line. Channel 2's Sophia Choi took a safety lesson with crews before going down herself. TRENDING STORIES: GSU police chief arrested on DUI charges Teenage son of former Braves player on life support after baseball injury From Mexico to metro Atlanta: Bust nets $1M in meth, $250K in cash 'It's super tight down there and it doesn't smell good either,' Choi said as she went through the sewer tunnels. In other instances, crews use a remote-controlled camera to assess the pipe, then a power washer-like machine to clean the gunk. 'We're finding grit, roots, dirt, lots of grease' said Darren Eastall, who's the consent decree administrator for DeKalb County. Crews have hauled off 80 tons of debris , so far this year. Assessments show about half the pipes need cleaning. County leaders say 38 percent of the large pipes are done, at a cost so far of $16.6 million.