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iPhone rumors: Curved screens and more precise touch sensors
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iPhone rumors: Curved screens and more precise touch sensors

iPhone rumors: Curved screens and more precise touch sensors

iPhone rumors: Curved screens and more precise touch sensors

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The latest iPhones have been out for about two months now, which means it’s high time the Apple rumor mill started discussing whatever’s coming next.

Bloomberg cites an anonymous inside source who says Apple is working on new iPhones with curved displays and more precise touch sensors.

Bloomberg’s source says the curves won’t be as severe as those in Samsung’s Galaxy Round prototype, seen here. Instead the edges of the screen will curve down along the bezel.

The new screens would stretch to 4.7 and 5.5 inches. 9to5mac expects the timing would match Apple’s recent pattern of releasing refreshed iPhone models in September.

Releasing two models at once would also mirror Apple’s most recent phone debut — the simultaneous 5s and 5c release was the first time Apple has ever sent two new iPhone models to market at the same time.

And in a separate but simultaneous rumor, Apple is said to be working up touch sensors precise enough to determine the amount of pressure a user is exerting.

TechCrunch thinks this rumor could be more exciting than larger screens, because better sensors add more use cases and could get Apple into new segments of the market.

“True pressure sensitivity would make drawing and handwriting applications on the iPhone and iPad much, much better. Apple could sell the devices as professional-level artistic devices if it introduces those kinds of features.

These sensors reportedly won’t be ready for the next round of iPhones, though. The source says they’d likely show up two generations from now.

- See more at Newsy.com

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